• Title, Summary, Keyword: Bifidobacterium spp

Search Result 71, Processing Time 0.048 seconds

Effects of Rubus coreanus byproducts on intestinal microbiota and the immune modulation

  • Yu, Da Yoon;Kim, Sung Hak;Kim, Jeong A;Kim, In Sung;Moon, Yang Soo;Lee, Sang Suk;Park, Hwa Chun;Jung, Jong Hyun;Chung, Yi Hyung;Shin, Dae Keun;Nam, Ki Chang;Choi, In Soon;Cho, Kwang Keun
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
    • /
    • v.31 no.3
    • /
    • pp.429-438
    • /
    • 2018
  • Objective: Although the efficacy of Rubus coreanus (RC) byproducts as a feed additive has been recognized, its effects on intestinal microorganisms and the immune system are still unknown. Methods: Six-week-old male rats were treated with 0.5% RC (T1), 1.0% RC (T2), and 1.5% RC (T3) for 4 weeks. Results: We found that treatment with RC byproducts significantly increased the daily gain of body weight and feed intake. Treg-cell differentiation was enhanced in the mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen from the rats fed with RC byproducts. Illumina sequencing showed that bacteria in the phylum Firmicutes decreased and while those in the phylum Bacteroidetes increased in RC-treated groups. Particularly, the pathogenic microorganisms in the family Peptococcaceae decreased, and the non-pathogenic families Lachnospiraceae and S24-7 increased. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the RC byproducts increased the lactic acid bacteria Bifidobacterium spp., Oscillospira spp., Leuconostoc citreum, and Weissella cibaria in a concentration-dependent manner. Conclusion: RC byproducts may be effective in immunomodulation by affecting intestinal microorganisms.

Antimicrobial Effect of Achyranthes japonica Nakai Extracts against Clostridium difficile (우슬 추출물의 Clostridium difficile에 대한 항균 효과)

  • Jung, Sun-Mi;Choi, Soo-Im;Park, Sang-Min;Heo, Tae-Ryeon
    • Korean Journal of Food Science and Technology
    • /
    • v.39 no.5
    • /
    • pp.564-568
    • /
    • 2007
  • In this study, the ethanolic extracts of 40 species of traditional herbal medicines were examined for their antimicrobial activities against Clostridium difficile. Among the 43 screened traditional herbal medicines, Achyranthes Japonica Nakai (AJN), Siegesbeckia glabrescens Makino, and Phelloedendron amurense Ruprecht showed antimicrobial activities greater than 90% at a concentration of 500 ppm. According to the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) test the ethyl acetate soluble fraction of the AJN ethanolic extracts (AJNEA) showed the highest growth inhibitory activity against C. difficile, with a MIC of $625{\mu}g/mL$. In addition, the effect of AJNEA on the growth of lactic acid bacteria was investigated. AJNEA did not inhibit the growth of the tested Bifidobacterium spp. or Lactobacillus spp., with the exception of B. longum, Streptococcus thermophilus, and L. helveticus. These results indicate that AJNEA can be utilized as a potential antimicrobial agent against C. difficile related disease.

Effects of Zizyphus jujuba var. boeunesis Extracts on the Growth of Intestinal Microflora and Its Antioxidant Activities (대추 추출물이 장내 미생물의 생육에 미치는 영향 및 항산화 활성)

  • Jeong, Hye-Mi;Kim, Yi-Seul;Ahn, Seung-Joon;Auh, Mi-Sun;Ahn, Jun-Bae;Kim, Kwang-Yup
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Food Science and Nutrition
    • /
    • v.40 no.4
    • /
    • pp.500-508
    • /
    • 2011
  • This study was carried out to investigate the effects of jujube extracts on intestinal microflora, along with their antioxidant activities, according to extraction method. The antimicrobial activities of the extracts were measured using the agar diffusion method with a jujube extract concentration of 50 mg/mL. Neither the first nor second jujube extracts were inhibitory against the tested intestinal bacteria. However, water extracts of jujube significantly enhanced the growth of lactic acid bacteria, especially Bifidobacterium bifidum and Bifidobacterium adolescentis. Total phenol compounds and flavonoid compounds were higher in the 1st than in the 2nd water extracts. The EDA values of both water and ethanol extracts increased in proportion to the extract concentration. The 1st water extract showed the highest value among all the others, which was 85.60% at the concentration of 0.05 mg/mL. Furthermore, the 1st water extract showed stronger antioxidant activity than the other samples with an activity of 679.91 mg AA eq/g. These results support the potential use of jujube water extracts as a functional food component and a valuable resource for the development of nutraceutical foods, to increase the growth of Bifidobacterium spp. in the human intestine.

Utilization of Makgeolli sludge for growth of probiotic bacteria (Probiotic bacteria의 생장에 대한 막걸리슬러지의 이용)

  • Kim, Wan-Sub
    • Korean Journal of Agricultural Science
    • /
    • v.38 no.3
    • /
    • pp.473-477
    • /
    • 2011
  • A number of health benefits have been claimed for probiotic bacteria such as Bifidobacterium (B) spp. Lactobacillus(L) acidophilus, and Lactococcus(Lc) cremoris. Viability of probiotic bacteria is important in order to provide health benefits. Only a limited culture media for the test purpose of probiotic bacteria are commercially available (MRS broth), but the media for large-scale propagation of viable cells which are able to be used as food additive are not available. The manufacture of a low priced and preferred novel medium for probiotic bacteria was therefore, attempted using whey protein concentrate(WPC) and Makgeolli sludge as a starting material. The effect of WPC and Makgeolli sludge on the growth of four strains (B. bifidum 15696, B. longum 15707, L. acidophilus CH-2, and Lc. cremoris 20076) was investigated. Medium prepared such as WPC, Makgeolli sludge, and WPC+Makgeolli sludge(WPCMs). It was observed that the growth of 4 strains (B. bifidum 15696, B. longum 15707, L. acidophilus CH-2, and Lc. cremoris 20076) was stimulated by Makgeolli sludge, WPC, WPCMs. Especially, Viable cell number of 4 strains in the WPCMs were higher than that of the single media. These result suggest the possibility that Makgeolli and WPC, acts as a growth factor for the growth of probiotic bacteria.

Comparison of Environmental Stress Tolerance Between Lactobacillus fermentum Strains with High and Low Cell Surface Hydrophobicity

  • Li, Shao-Ji;Jeon, Jeong-Min;Hong, Sang-Won;So, Jae-Seong
    • Food Science and Biotechnology
    • /
    • v.17 no.2
    • /
    • pp.257-261
    • /
    • 2008
  • Previous studies have suggested a possible correlation between cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and stress tolerance in Bifidobacterium. In this study, the relationship was examined between CSH and environmental stress tolerance in Lactobacillus spp. By measuring the adhesion to hexadecane, 2 Lactobacillus fermentum strains- KLB 261 and KLB 231 were found to have high and low CSH, respectively. To measure their tolerance to various stresses, cells were subjected to salt (2 M NaCl), acid (pH 2), $H_2O_2$ (0.01 %, v/v), ethanol (20%, v/v), heat ($60^{\circ}C$), and cold ($-20^{\circ}C$). Compared with KLB 231, the hydrophobic KLB 261 was found to be much more resistant to the various stresses examined. After being subjected to different stresses for a period of time, KLB 261 and KLB 231 showed 50 and 0% survivability in 2 M NaCl, 108.2 and 0.6% in 0.01 %(v/v) $H_2O_2$, 40.2%(v/v), and 3.7% at $60^{\circ}C$ incubation, 4 and 0.6% at $-20^{\circ}C$, 12.9 and 0.1 % in pH 2, 33.8 and 0.2% in 20%(v/v) ethanol, respectively. Autoaggregation test and morphological observation were also conducted in an attempt to explain these differences. These results suggested that high CSH could strengthen the stress tolerance of lactobacilli.

Effects of Tannic Acid Added to Diets Containing Low Level of Iron on Performance, Blood Hematology, Iron Status and Fecal Microflora in Weanling Pigs

  • Lee, Seung-Hyung;Shinde, Prashant;Choi, Jae-Yong;Kwon, Ill-Kyong;Lee, Jeong-Koo;Pak, Son-Il;Cho, Won-Tak;Chae, Byung-Jo
    • Journal of Animal Science and Technology
    • /
    • v.51 no.6
    • /
    • pp.503-510
    • /
    • 2009
  • This study investigated the effects of tannic acid (TA) in the diets for weanling pigs prepared with/without supplemental Fe on performance, hematology, fecal microflora and diarrhea incidence. Limestone and calcium phosphate used in Experiment 1 and 2 were of semi-synthetic and feed-grade quality, respectively; while the trace-mineral premix used in both the experiments was prepared without any added Fe source. In Experiment 1, 108 weaned pigs (Landrace ${\times}$ Yorkshire ${\times}$ Duroc, initially 6.46 ${\pm}$ 1.04 kg BW) were allotted to 3 treatments including control (diet added with $FeSO_4$ and antibiotic), T1 (diet devoid of $FeSO_4$ and antibiotic) and T2 (T1 diet added with 125 mg/kg TA). Each treatment had 4 replicates with 9 pigs in each pen. Feeding of T1 diet had a negative effect on the performance and plasma Fe status of pigs, while addition of TA to T1 diet resulted in performance of pigs comparable to pigs fed the control diet, reduced diarrhea incidence but had a negative influence on the hematological and plasma Fe indices. Additionally, pigs fed T2 diet had fewer (p<0.05) total anaerobic bacteria, Clostridium spp. and coliforms than pigs fed T1 diet, and greater number of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. in feces when compared with pigs fed control and T1 diets. In Experiment 2, 144 weaned pigs (Landrace ${\times}$ Yorkshire ${\times}$ Duroc, initially 6.00 ${\pm}$ 1.07 kg BW) were allotted to 4 dietary treatments including control (diet added with $FeSO_4$ and antibiotic) and diets devoid of supplemental Fe added with antibiotic (An), TA and both (AnTA). Each treatment had 4 replicates with 9 pigs in each pen. Addition of An, TA or both to diets devoid of supplemental Fe did not have any effect on performance, blood hematology and plasma Fe but resulted in reduced (p<0.05) diarrhea incidence and lower (p<0.05) fecal coliform population than pigs fed the control diet. These results suggest that TA has a negative influence on blood hematology and plasma Fe status when diets are inadequate in Fe; however, TA reduced diarrhea incidence and might have antimicrobial activity.

Simultaneous Determination of Carbohydrates and Organic Acids in Various Cultured Dairy Foods by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography: A Preliminary Study (다양한 낙농 발효유제품에서 HPLC를 이용하여 탄수화물과 유기산의 동시 검출에 관한 연구)

  • Kim, Dong-Hyeon;Hwang, Dae-Geun;Chon, Jung-Whan;Kim, Hyunsook;Kim, Hong-Seok;Song, Kwang-Young;Yim, Jin-Hyuk;Kim, Young-Ji;Kang, Il-Byung;Lee, Soo-Kyung;Seo, Kun-Ho
    • Journal of Dairy Science and Biotechnology
    • /
    • v.33 no.4
    • /
    • pp.263-269
    • /
    • 2015
  • Various carbohydrates (lactose, glucose, and fructose), lactic acid, uric acid, and acetoin were separated on a ZORBAX Carbohydrate Analysis column using the Agilent 1200 HPLC ChemStation$^{TM}$, and were identified according to retention times with 325 Dual Wavelength UV-Vis Detector and Refractive Index Detector with 0.013 N $H_2SO_4$ at a flow rate of 0.8 mL/min. In addition, the lactase activity of four commercial probiotic lactic acid bacteria during 6-hour incubation was determined using a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. Among the tested samples, Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis showed the greatest lactase activity, followed by Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus casei, with Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus showing the lowest activity. Therefore, this HPLC technique shows potential for evaluating the fermentation processes of probiotic lactic acid bacteria and could simultaneously confirm the degree of ripening in various fermented dairy foods within only a half hour.

  • PDF

Effects of citrus pulp, fish by-product and Bacillus subtilis fermentation biomass on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, and fecal microflora of weanling pigs

  • Noh, Hyun Suk;Ingale, Santosh Laxman;Lee, Su Hyup;Kim, Kwang Hyun;Kwon, Ill Kyong;Kim, Young Hwa;Chae, Byung Jo
    • Journal of Animal Science and Technology
    • /
    • v.56 no.3
    • /
    • pp.10.1-10.7
    • /
    • 2014
  • An experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary supplementation with citrus pulp, fish by-product, and Bacillus subtilis fermentation biomass on the growth performance, apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of nutrients, and fecal microflora of weanling pigs. A total of 180 weaned piglets (Landrace ${\times}$ Yorkshire ${\times}$ Duroc) were randomly allotted to three treatments on the basis of body weight (BW). There were six replicate pens in each treatment with 10 piglets per pen. Dietary treatments were corn-soybean meal-based basal diet supplemented with 0 (control), 2.5, and 5.0% citrus pulp, fish by-product, and B. subtilis fermentation biomass. The isocaloric and isoproteineous experimental diets were fed in mash form in two phases (d 0 ~ 14, phase I and d 15 ~ 28, phase II). Dietary treatments had significant linear effects on gain to feed ratio (G:F) in all periods, whereas significant linear effects on ATTD of dry matter (DM), gross energy (GE), and ash were only observed in phase I. Piglets fed diet supplemented with 5.0% citrus pulp, fish by-product, and B. subtilis fermentation biomass showed greater (p < 0.05) G:F (phase I, phase II, and overall) as well as ATTD of DM, GE, and ash (phase I) than pigs fed control diet. Dietary treatments also had significant linear effects on total anaerobic bacteria populations by d 14 and 28. In addition, piglets fed diet supplemented with 5.0% citrus pulp, fish by-product and B. subtilis fermentation biomass showed greater (p < 0.05) fecal total anaerobic bacteria populations (d 14 and 28) than pigs fed control diet. Dietary treatments had no significant effects (linear or quadratic) on average daily gain (ADG), average dial feed intake (ADFI; phase I, phase II, and overall), or fecal populations of Bifidobacterium spp., Clostridium spp., and coliforms (d 14 and 28). These results indicate that dietary supplementation with 5.0% citrus pulp, fish by-product, and B. subtilis fermentation biomass has the potential to improve the feed efficiency, nutrient digestibility, and fecal microflora of weanling pigs.

Effect of Panax ginseng Extract on Growth Responses of Human Intestinal Bacteria and Bacterial Metabolism

  • Ahn, Y.J.;Kim, M.J.;Kawamura, T.;Yamamoto, T.;Fujisawa, T.;Mitsuoka, T.
    • Proceedings of the Ginseng society Conference
    • /
    • /
    • pp.111-122
    • /
    • 1990
  • The growth responses of a variety of human Intestinal bacteria to extracts of Pun(1.vKy'n.ieny and five other oriental medicinal Araliaceae were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The extracts enhanced the growth of Bifidobncterilim breve and B. longum in Media with or without carbon sources, suggesting the bifid factor (5) might be involved in the phenomenon. This effect was most pronounced with water extract of p. ginseng, the growth of 27 bifidobacteria strains belonging to B. ndolexcentium, H. longlrm, and 1. breve and B. iniuntis being greatly stimurated, whereas seven B. bifidum strains and other bacteria such as clostridia and 5.fcherirhia coli had little or no ability to utilizes it (or growth. Methanol extracts of p, ginseng were found to selectively inhibit growth of various clostridia including C. perfringens and C. Paraputrificum, but this effect was not observed on other bacteria including bifidobacteria. The effect of ginseng extract intake(600 mg/day for two weeks) on the fecal microflora, pH, volatile fatty acids, ammonia, putrefactive products, and -glucuronidase, -glucosidase and nitroreductase activities, and on the blood components (triglyceride, total cholesterol and ammonia) were investigated using seven healthy human volunteers. The total concentration of fecal microflora including Bri'idobucterilim app. during the period of ginseng extract intake was significantly unaffected from the proceeding and sub sequent control periods. However, the frequency of occurrence of subjects having C. perfringens was significantly decreased. The fecal pH value was also significantly decreased, suggesting that the intake might increase the activity of Bifidobacterium spp. Other biochemical properties in faces did not changed significantly. The levels of ammonia and triglycerid in blood were decreased with ginseng extract intake. These results may be an indication of at least one of the pharmacological actions of P ginseng as an adaptogen.

  • PDF

Acid Stress Response of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in Commercial Yogurt (발효유제품에서 Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG의 생육 특성)

  • Bang, Miseon;Jeong, Anna;Park, Dong-June;Lim, Kwang-Sei;Oh, Sejong
    • Journal of Dairy Science and Biotechnology
    • /
    • v.33 no.1
    • /
    • pp.83-91
    • /
    • 2015
  • Yogurt is a product of the acidic fermentation of milk, which affects the survival of lactic acid bacteria (LAB). The aim of this present study was to examine the survival and acid stress response of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG to low pH environment. The survival of LAB in commercial yogurt was measured during long-term storage. The enumeration of viable cells of LAB was determined at 15-day intervals over 52-weeks at $5^{\circ}C$. L. acidophilus, L. casei, and Bifidobacterium spp. showed low viability. However, L. rhamnosus GG exhibited excellent survival throughout the refrigerated storage period. At the end of 52-weeks, L. rhamnosus GG survived 7.0 log10 CFU/mL. $F_0F_1$ ATPase activity in L. rhamnosus GG at pH 4.5 was also evaluated. The ATPase activities of the membranes were higher when exposed at pH 4.5 for 24 h. The survival of L. rhamnosus GG was attributable to the induction in $F_0F_1$ ATPase activity. In addition, the mRNA expression levels of acid stress-inducible genes at low pH were investigated by qRT-PCR. clpC and clpE genes were up-regulated after 1 h, and atpA and dnaK genes were up-regulated after 24 h of incubation at pH 4.5. These genes could enhance the survival of L. rhamnosus GG in the acidic condition. Thus, the modulation of the enzymes or genes to assist the viability of LAB in the low pH environment is thought to be important.

  • PDF