• Title, Summary, Keyword: Canola Meal

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Utilization of Canola Full-Fat Seeds and the Restored Mixture of Meal and Oil by Broiler (브로일러에 대한 Canola 전지종실 및 Canola 박과 기름 혼합물의 사료이용)

  • 이규호;심정석
    • Korean Journal of Poultry Science
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    • v.17 no.2
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    • pp.93-100
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    • 1990
  • Two experiments were conducted to assess the use of full-fat canola seed and restored oil meal plus oil of canola in the ration for broiler chicks. In the first experiment, broilers received diets containing 10% heated or non-heated full-fat canola seed and conola oil meal mixed with corresponding oil or animal fat. In the second experiment, broiler diets contained 10 or 20% of canola seed and canoia meal mixed with canola oil. Heat treatment of full-fat canola seed and the types of fat mixed with meals had no significant effect on all of broiler performance and nutrient retention parameters investigated. Bioilers consuming 10 to 20% dietary canola seed or mixture of canola meal plus oil performed as well as the control birds. It is concluded that the canola seed or the mixture of restored canola meal plus oil or fat can be well utilized by broiler at dietary levels of 10 to 20%.

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The Effects of Canola or Mustard Biodiesel Press Cake on Nutrient Digestibility and Performance of Broiler Chickens

  • Thacker, P.A.;Petri, D.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.22 no.11
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    • pp.1531-1539
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    • 2009
  • This study compared the nutritional value of canola (B. napa) and mustard (B. hirta) press cakes obtained from the biodiesel industry as ingredients for use in diets fed to broiler chickens. A total of 210, one-day old, male broiler chicks were randomly assigned to one of seven dietary treatments. The control diet was based on wheat and soybean meal and contained 15% canola meal. For the experimental diets, 5, 10 or 15% of the canola meal was replaced with an equal amount of either canola or mustard biodiesel press cake. Dry matter and neutral detergent fiber digestibility were significantly higher for birds fed diets containing either canola or mustard biodiesel press cake compared with canola meal. Dry matter and neutral detergent fiber digestibility of the canola biodiesel press cakes was higher than the mustard biodiesel press cakes. Ether extract digestibility and nitrogen retention were significantly higher for birds fed canola biodiesel press cake compared with canola meal and mustard biodiesel press cake. Body weight gain and feed intake did not differ between birds fed canola or mustard biodiesel press cake and canola meal. In addition, there was no significant difference in body weight gain or feed intake between birds fed diets containing canola or mustard biodiesel press cake. Feed conversion was significantly improved for birds fed either canola or mustard biodiesel press cake compared with canola meal. Mortality was unaffected by treatment. Since the performance of broilers fed canola biodiesel press cakes was essentially the same as that of broilers fed canola meal, it is difficult to justify a premium to be paid for canola biodiesel press cake over that paid for canola meal. In addition, there was no difference in the performance of broilers fed biodiesel press cake obtained from canola or mustard seed. As mustard seeds are generally available at a lower price than canola seed, there may be some incentive to use mustard rather than canola seed for producing biodiesel press cake for use in poultry production.

Assessment of Ruminal and Post Ruminal Amino Acid Digestibility of Chinese and Canadian Rapeseed (Canola) Meals

  • Chen, Xibin;Campbell, Lloyd D.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.16 no.7
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    • pp.979-982
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    • 2003
  • Two rapeseed meal samples (Sample A, hybrid 5900 and sample B, double low rapeseed No.4) obtained from China and one Canola meal sample obtained from a local crushing plant in Canada were used to investigate the amino acid degradability of rapeseed/Canola meal in rumen and amino acid digestibility of ruminal incubation residues by precision-fed rooster bioassay. Results show that in ruminal incubation the degradation rate of non amino acid nitrogen in crude protein is higher than that for amino acid nitrogen in crude protein, the results also suggest that the degradation rate of amino acid nitrogen in Chinese rapeseed meal sample B was lower than that for Canadian Canola, but that in Chinese rapeseed meal sample A is much close to that for Canadian canola meal. For all amino acids the digestibility of the bypass or residual protein as measured by the precision-fed rooster bioassay tended to be lower for Chinese rapeseed meal sample A than for sample B or Canadian canola meal which had similar digestibility values. However following a calculation of total amino acid availability, involving the digestibility of amino acids in the rumen and rooster bioassay the results are less contradictory. Results indicated that in traditional roasting-expelling process, heat treatment, especially dry heat treatmeat could decrease amino acids degradability in rumen of rapeseed/canola meal, but also may decrease total availability of amino acids of rapeseed/canola meal.

Recent advances in canola meal utilization in swine nutrition

  • Mejicanos, G.;Sanjayan, N.;Kim, I.H.;Nyachoti, C.M.
    • Journal of Animal Science and Technology
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    • v.58 no.2
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    • pp.7.1-7.13
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    • 2016
  • Canola meal is derived from the crushing of canola seed for oil extraction. Although it has been used in swine diets for a long time, its inclusion levels have been limited due to concerns regarding its nutritive value primarily arising from results of early studies showing negative effects of dietary canola meal inclusion in swine diets. Such effects were attributable to the presence of anti-nutritional factors (ANF; notably glucosinolates) in canola meal. However, due to advances in genetic improvements of canola that have led to production of cultivars with significantly lower ANF content and improved processing procedures, canola meal with a superior nutritive value for non-ruminant animals is now available. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to review the recent studies in the use of canola meal as feedstuff for swine, the factors influencing its use and the strategies to overcome them. First a historical overview of the development of canola is provided.

Protection of Canola (Low Glucosinolate Rapeseed) Meal and Seed Protein from Ruminal Degradation - Review -

  • Mustafa, A.F.;McKinnon, J.J.;Christensen, D.A.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.13 no.4
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    • pp.535-542
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    • 2000
  • Canola meal and seed are poor sources of ruminal undegraded protein (RUP). On average, canola meal and canola seed contains 35 and 14% RUP, respectively. Several protection methods are effective in reducing ruminal degradation of canola protein and in increasing RUP without affecting total tract protein digestibility. Heat (e.g., dry heat, moist heat and jet-sploding) and chemical (e.g., formaldehyde) treatments are the most common methods used to reduce ruminal degradability of canola protein. In most cases, heat treatments were found to be more effective than chemical treatments in protecting canola protein form ruminal degradation. Despite improvement in RUP content and intestinal availability of RUP, data form several studies showed little or no improvement in animal performance as a result of increasing the RUDP level of canola meal and seed.

Metabolizable Energy Contents and Amino Acid Availability values in the Full-Fat Seeds, Oil Meals and Oils of Canola (Canola전지종실과 유박 및 기름의 대사에너지 함량과 아미노산 이용률)

  • 이규호;심정석
    • Korean Journal of Poultry Science
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    • v.17 no.2
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    • pp.101-107
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    • 1990
  • Apparent and true metabolizable energy (AME and TME) contents and true amino acid availability (TAAA) values of full-fat seed, oil meal and oil of canola were assayed employing mature Single Comb white Leghorn roosters. For AME, test diets containing 30% level of canola full-fat seed, oil meal, oil meal plus oil or 10% level of oil were fed for a 3-day adaptation period, followed by a 4-day fecal collection period. For TME and TAAA, 30g test diets were force-fed and total excreta were collected for 48 hours, following a 24 hour fasting period. Metabolizable energy values were corrected to zero nitrogen balance(AMEn and TMEn), Canola contained 4,485, 1,984,8,275 and 5,655kcal/kg of AMEn and 4,577, 2,103, 8,487 and 5,630kcal/kg of TMEn for full-fat seed, oil meal, oil and mixture of meal plus oil, respectirely. The mixtures of oil meal plus oil had significantly higher available energy contents than the full-fat seeds (p<0.01) . In general, TAAA values of full-fat seed were higher than those of oil meal.

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Effect of Enzyme Supplementation on the Performance of Growing-Finishing Pigs Fed Barley-Based Diets Supplemented with Soybean Mealor Canola Meal

  • Thacker, P.A.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.14 no.7
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    • pp.1008-1013
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    • 2001
  • This experiment was conducted to determine the effects of enzyme supplementation on the performance of 80 growing-finishing pigs (26.2 kg) fed diets containing either soybean or canola meal. Barley-based diets formulated using either soybean meal or canola meal were fed with or without enzyme (Allzyme Vegpro, Alltech Biotechnology Centre). Eight castrates and twelve gilts were fed each diet. Digestibility of dry matter, crude protein and gross energy was 8.0 (p=0.0001), 7.9 (p=0.0005) and 7.9 (p=0.0003) percent lower for pigs fed diets containing canola meal compared with soybean meal. Enzyme supplementation had no effect on nutrient digestibility (p>0.05). There was a significant interaction between protein source and enzyme for all three nutrients. Over the entire experimental period (26.2 to 77.9 kg), pigs fed canola meal consumed 9.4% less feed (p=0.001), gained weight 20.4% slower (p=0.001) and had a 12.9% poorer feed conversion (p=0.001) than pigs fed soybean meal. Weight gain, feed intake and feed conversion were unaffected by enzyme addition (p>0.05). Castrates gained weight 11.4% faster (p=0.001), consumed 9.3% more feed (p=0.001) and had a 2.6% better feed conversion (p=0.026) than gilts. There was a significant interaction between protein source and sex of pig for feed conversion. Pigs fed diets based on canola meal had a significantly lower carcass value index (p=0.01), lower lean yield (p=0.007) and lower lean depth over the loin (p=0.001) than pigs fed diets based on soybean meal. Enzyme addition significantly increased lean depth over the loin (p=0.01). There was a significant interaction between protein source and enzyme for carcass value index (p=0.04), estimated lean yield (p=0.05) and fat depth over the loin (p=0.05). These results confirm previous studies which have demonstrated poorer pig performance when canola meal completely replaces soybean meal in diets fed to growing-finishing pigs. In addition, the results provide little justification for the inclusion of the Vegpro enzyme in diets fed to pigs of this weight range.

Performance, Digestibility and Carcass Characteristics of Growing/Finishing Pigs Fed Barley-Based Diets Supplemented with an Extruded or Unextruded Blend of Peas and Canola Seed or Meal

  • Thacker, P.A.;Qiao, Shiyan
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.15 no.1
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    • pp.102-105
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    • 2002
  • Seventy-two crossbred pigs weighing an average of 41.5 kg were assigned on the basis of sex, weight and litter to one of four dietary treatments in a factorial (4 treatments${\times}$2 sexes) arrangement. The control diet was based on barley and soybean meal while the experimental treatments consisted of diets in which a portion of the dietary protein was supplied by 20% of a 50:50 blend of extruded ($130^{\circ}C$ for 20 to 25 sec) peas and full-fat canola seed, 20% of a 50:50 blend of unextruded peas and full-fat canola seed or a diet containing 10% peas, 6% canola meal and 4% canola oil (to equal the level of canola oil provided by 10% whole canola seed). Digestibility coefficients for dry matter, crude protein and gross energy were significantly higher (p<0.05) for the control diet than for the other three diets. Extrusion produced no beneficial effects (p>0.05) on nutrient digestibility and there were no differences in digestibility between the diet based on intact canola seed compared with the diet containing canola meal and oil. Choice of protein supplement had no significant effects on gain, feed intake or feed conversion during the grower or finisher phases and over the entire experimental period. Extrusion of the pea-canola blend produced no beneficial effects on pig performance as the performance of pigs fed either the extruded or unextruded blend of peas and canola seed was similar. In addition, the performance of pigs fed diets containing intact canola seed was similar to that of pigs fed canola meal and oil. Castrates gained faster and consumed more feed than gilts (p<0.05). However, their feed conversion was poorer than that of the gilts during the finisher period. There were no significant differences in carcass traits between pigs fed the control and any of the experimental treatments. Extrusion had no effect on carcass traits and the carcasses of pigs fed canola meal and oil did not differ from those of pigs fed whole canola seed. Castrates had a significantly lower dressing percentage, lower estimated lean yield but greater loin fat depth than gilts (p<0.05). The results of this experiment indicate that peas in combination with canola seed or canola meal are an acceptable alternative to soybean meal as a protein supplement for use in growing-finishing swine diets. Extrusion did not appear to have any beneficial effects on the nutritional value of the canola seed-pea blend as nutrient digestibility, growth performance and carcass traits were similar for pigs fed the unextruded blend of peas and canola seed compared with the extruded product. Since the process adds to the cost of the raw products, its use is unlikely to be economical.

Effect of Gamma Irradiation on Anti Nutritional Factors and Nutritional Value of Canola Meal for Broiler Chickens

  • Gharaghani, Hossein;Zaghari, Mojtaba;Shahhosseini, Gholamreza;Moravej, Hossein
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.21 no.10
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    • pp.1479-1485
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    • 2008
  • Two completely randomized block design experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of gamma irradiation processing of canola meal on performance parameters of broiler chicks (Ross 308) and protein quality of canola meal. Protein efficiency ratio (PER) and net protein ratio (NPR) were measured as indices of canola meal protein quality. Samples of canola meal were tested for nutritional value after being irradiated at dose levels 10, 20 and 30 kGy. Glucosinolate content was reduced 40, 70 and 89 percent at irradiation dose levels of 10, 20 and 30 kGy respectively (p<0.01). Percent of erucic acid in total fatty acid content increased 44, 58 and 48% as a function of radiation dose (p<0.01). Dose levels did not affect feed conversion ratio (FCR) and body weight gain of chicks (p>0.05). Liver weight was decreased by irradiation dose (p<0.05). The same trend was observed for kidney weights, but this trend was not significant (p>0.05). Gamma irradiation processing of canola meal had no significant effect on $T_3$ level in blood of chickens that consumed canola meal, but $T_4$ level of chicken blood at the 30 kGy dose decreased significantly (p<0.05). PER and NPR were not affected by radiation dose level (p>0.05). Gamma irradiation seems to be a good procedure to improve the nutritional quality of canola meal.

Nutritional Evaluation of Canola Protein Concentrate for Broiler Chickens

  • Thacker, P.A.;Petri, D.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.24 no.11
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    • pp.1607-1614
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    • 2011
  • This trial was conducted to determine the effects of including canola protein concentrate in diets fed to broiler chickens on nutrient digestibility and broiler performance (0-21 days). A total of 180, day-old, male broiler chicks weighing an average of 52.8${\pm}$0.6 g were assigned to one of six dietary treatments in a completely randomized design. The control diet was based on corn and soybean meal and contained 15% canola meal. The experimental diets contained 3, 6, 9, 12 or 15% canola protein concentrate added at the expense of canola meal. There were five birds per pen and six replicate pens per treatment. Feed and water were available ad libitum throughout the 21-day experiment. Chromic oxide (0.35%) was added to all diets as a digestibility marker and was fed throughout the experimental period. The digestibility of dry matter, energy and phosphorus increased linearly (p<0.01) with increasing levels of canola protein concentrate. Although nutrient digestibility was higher for birds fed diets containing canola protein concentrate, these improvements did not translate into improvements in broiler performance. Weight gain was unaffected (p = 0.24) by level of canola protein concentrate. Feed intake was significantly increased (p<0.01) with the result that feed conversion tended to be poorer (p = 0.07) for birds fed diets containing canola protein concentrate. Mortality was also unaffected (p = 0.56) by dietary treatment.