• Title, Summary, Keyword: Catastrophization

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Neuroticism and pain catastrophizing aggravate response to pain in healthy adults: an experimental study

  • Banozic, Adriana;Miljkovic, Ana;Bras, Marijana;Puljak, Livia;Kolcic, Ivana;Hayward, Caroline;Polasek, Ozren
    • The Korean Journal of Pain
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    • v.31 no.1
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    • pp.16-26
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    • 2018
  • Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between neuroticism, pain catastrophizing, and experimentally induced pain threshold and pain tolerance in a healthy adult sample from two regions of the country of Croatia: the island of Korcula and city of Split. Methods: A total of 1,322 participants were enrolled from the Island of Korcula (n = 824) and the city of Split (n = 498). Participants completed a self-reported personality measure Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ) and pain catastrophizing questionnaire Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS), followed by a mechanical pain pressure threshold and tolerance test. We have explored the mediating role of catastrophizing in the relationship between neuroticism and pain intensity. Results: The results showed that pain catastrophizing partially mediated the relationship between neuroticism and pain intensity, suggesting the importance of pain catastrophizing in increasing vulnerability to pain. The results also indicated gender-related differences, marked by the higher pain threshold and tolerance in men. Conclusions: This study adds to the understanding of the complex interplay between personality and pain, by providing a better understanding of such mechanisms in healthy adults.

Acceptance versus catastrophizing in predicting quality of life in patients with chronic low back pain

  • Semeru, Gracia Mayuni;Halim, Magdalena S.
    • The Korean Journal of Pain
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    • v.32 no.1
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    • pp.22-29
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    • 2019
  • Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between pain catastrophizing, acceptance, and quality of life in relation to chronic low back pain in Jakarta, the capital city of Indonesia. We also analyze the effect of personality in catastrophizing and acceptance. Methods: A total of 52 chronic low back pain patients were enrolled as participants from 2 hospitals in Jakarta (43 females, 9 males, mean age 54.38 years). Participants completed a set of self-reported questionnaires: the NEO Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI), Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire-Revised (CPAQ-R), Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS), and Pain Discomfort Module (PDM). Results: This study showed that acceptance increased the patient's quality of life by giving physical relief from pain. In contrast, pain catastrophizing decreased the quality of life, and increased the patients' tendency to get frustrated, irritated, and anxious about the pain. From a personality perspective, the trait neuroticism may lead to a higher level of pain catastrophizing. Conclusions: This study showed that catastrophizing, compared with acceptance, had a greater impact on the patient's life by reducing its quality.

Risk Factors of the Masticatory Function in Patients with Temporomandibular Disorders: A Cross-Sectional Cohort Study

  • Kim, Keon-Hyung;Park, Jo-Eun;Kim, Mee-Eun;Kim, Hye-Kyoung
    • Journal of Oral Medicine and Pain
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    • v.44 no.3
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    • pp.92-102
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    • 2019
  • Purpose: To investigate the masticatory function of patients with different temporomandibular disorders (TMD) phenotypes, and to explore the risk factors for the masticatory function of TMD patients among multiple biopsychosocial variables using patient-reported outcomes (PROs). Methods: Clinical features and TMD diagnoses of 250 cases were investigated by reviewing medical records. Psychosocial factors were evaluated using four questionnaires representing pain severity and pain interference (Brief Pain Inventory), pain catastrophizing (Pain Catastrophizing Scale, PCS), psychological distress (Symptom Check List-90-Revised, SCL-90R) and kinesiophobia (Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia for Temporomandibular Disorders, TSK-TMD). Masticatory function, as a dependent variable, was determined using the Jaw Functional Limitation Scale (JFLS). Kruskal-Wallis test and Spearman's rank correlation were used for analyses. Results: A total of 145 cases were included and classified into four subgroups including group 1: TMD with internal derangement without pain (n=14), group 2: TMD with muscle pain (n=32), group 3: TMD with joint pain (n=60) and group 4: TMD with muscle-joint combined pain (n=39). Pain severity (p=0.001) and interference (p=0.022) were the highest in group 2, but the mean global score of JFLS was the highest in group 3, followed by group 4, group 2, and group 1 (p=0.013). Pain severity, pain interference, the mean global score of PCS and the mean global score of TSK-TMD showed significant and moderate correlation with the mean global score of JFLS. All subdimensions and the global severity index of SCL-90R had significant, but weak correlations with all scores of JFLS. Conclusions: The results suggest that masticatory functional limitation depends on the TMD phenotypes. Among the various PROs, pain perception, pain catastrophizing and kinesiophobia seem to be more influential risk factors on jaw function than psychological distress, such as depression and anxiety.

Pain Catastrophizing for Patients with Temporomandibular Disorders

  • Park, Jin-Ho;Kim, Hye-Kyoung;Kim, Ki-Suk;Kim, Mee-Eun
    • Journal of Oral Medicine and Pain
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    • v.40 no.2
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    • pp.47-54
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    • 2015
  • Purpose: Besides depression and anxiety, recently pain catastrophizing has been emphasized for an important psychological factor explaining pain response in various pain conditions including temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). The aims of this study were to evaluate pain catastrophizing of TMD patients and to investigate how the level of pain catastrophizing related with clinical variables and psychometric morbidity. Methods: Inclusion criterion was all new TMD patients ${\geq}18$ years old attending the Department of Orofacial Pain and Oral Medicine of Dankook University Dental Hospital (Cheonan, Korea) over three-month period in 2014, who completed questionnaires. The questionnaires included the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS), and Symptom Check List- 90-Revised (SCL-90-R). All of them were examined clinically and diagnosed. Results: One hundred fifty five patients diagnosed as TMDs were participated in this study (mean age of $38.7{\pm}15.2$ years, male:female=1:2.5). Mean PCS score of the patients was 17.3 with standard deviation of 12.6. By the median of the PCS score (i.e., 15), the subjects were categorized into the high (${\geq}15$) and low catastrophizers (<15). Increased pain severity and interference and increased score of psychological features of SCL-90-R were found in the TMD patients with higher level of catastrophizing (p<0.001) and there was weak to moderate correlation between those factors (p<0.05). Difference in catastrophizing level was not found for other variables such as age, gender, duration of pain, education level and types of TMDs. Conclusions: Conclusively, pain catastrophizing of TMD patients relates positively to pain severity and pain interference. In addition to depression and anxiety, pain catastrophizing is positively correlated with variable other psychological morbidity such as somatization, obsessive- compulsive, interpersonal sensitivity, paranoid ideation and psychoticism. Types of TMD diagnosis do not seem to affect catastrophizing level. The results of this study suggest that pain catastrophizing should be emphasized and assessed in the TMD patients.

Quantitative and Qualitative Gradient of Pain Experience, Sleep Quality and Psychological Distress in Patients with Different Phenotypes of Temporomandibular Disorders

  • Choi, Hee Hun;Kim, Hye-Kyoung;Kim, Mee-Eun
    • Journal of Oral Medicine and Pain
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    • v.45 no.3
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    • pp.56-64
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    • 2020
  • Purpose: Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) is a mosaic of clinical signs and symptoms that can be regarded as a set of phenotypes that are affected by various factors including pain sensitivity, pain disability, sleep and psychological functioning. The aims of this study were to evaluate association of pain experience, sleep quality and psychological distress with different phenotypes of TMD patients. Methods: This retrospective study included a cohort (n=1,858; 63.8% for female, mean age=34.9±15.9 years) of patients with TMD. A set of self-administered questionnaires concerning pain interference (Brief Pain Inventory), pain disability (Graded Chronic Pain Scale), sleep quality (Pittsburg Sleep Questionnaire Index), psychological distress (Symptom Checklist-90 revised), and pain catastrophizing (Pain Catastrophizing Scale) were administered to all participants at the first consultation. All TMD patients were classified into four groups including TMD with internal derangement without pain (TMD_ID, n=370), TMD with joint pain (TMD_J, n=571), TMD with muscle pain (TMD_M, n=541) and TMD with muscle-joint combined pain (TMD_MJ, n=376). Results: The female ratio was particularly high in the group with TMD_MJ (p=0.001). The patients with muscle pain and both muscle and joint pain had longer symptom duration (p=0.004) and presented significantly higher scores in pain experience (p<0.001), subjective sleep quality (p<0.001), pain catastrophizing (p<0.001) and psychological distress (p<0.05) except for paranoid-ideation than the groups with only joint problems. Conclusions: The results of this study highlight the importance of multi-dimensional approach that consider pain disability, sleep quality, and psychological functioning in the management of TMD with muscle component. This study would contribute to a better understanding of interaction between heterogeneous TMD and multiple risk factors in order to build tailored treatment based on different phenotypes.