• Title, Summary, Keyword: Central Asia

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The Sogdian Descendants in Mongol and post-Mongol Central Asia: The Tajiks and Sarts

  • LEE, JOO-YUP
    • Acta Via Serica
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    • v.5 no.1
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    • pp.187-198
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    • 2020
  • This paper is devoted to the examination of the identity of the Sogdian descendants and their historical role in the second millennium CE. More specifically, it discusses the Sogdian connection to the later Iranic-speaking peoples of Central Asia, namely, the Sarts and the Tajiks. It then discusses the symbiotic relationship between the Sogdian descendants and the Mongols and the Mongol descendants (Chaghatays and Uzbeks) in Central Asia. In sum, this paper argues that the Sogdians did not perish after the Arab conquest of Central Asia in the eighth century CE. They survived under new exonyms Sart and Tajik. Like the Sogdians in pre-Islamic Central Asia, the Tajiks or Sarts played important historical roles in the Mongol and post-Mongol states of Central Asia, maintaining a symbiotic relationship with the nomad elites.

A Comparative Study on the Upper Garment in the Ancient East and West (고대(古代) 동서양(東西洋) 상의(上衣) 비교연구(比較硏究))

  • Yu, Song-Ok
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Costume
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    • v.3
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    • pp.29-46
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    • 1980
  • The purpose of this thesis is to find out how the upper garment styles in the Ancient East and est had been influenced with each other. Analytical studies conclude the fellowing findings: 1) Upper garment styles in the feat Asia and the Egypt already highly developed in 28th century B.C. and show us the original style of the wrap-over to the left and that of the round neckline(曲領). Upper garment of the open in the center front shown in Babylonia in 18th century B.C. had been inherited to the caftan of the Hebrew and later succeeded to the Persia. 2) The tunic styles of the round neckline, the wrap-over to the left and the open in the cotter front, which were the basic styles of the upper garment, had teen widely accepted to the central Asia and the East Asia, as well as the Northern Europe, from the West Asia. 3) The styles of the wrap-over to the right originated from China since it had begun to show in the Shang Dynasty(商代, 殷代). 4) The East and the West costumes had been very much intermixed in 4th century B.C. Alexander the Great of Macedoria in 4th century B.C. expanded his territory to the central Asia and built up the Bacteria, when the most western civilization had been greatly transmitted to the Orient. Meanwhile the tunic being clad in the West and Central Asia began to be worn by soldiers in the period of the Warring States in China (326-299 B.C.) and afterwards worn even by civil officials since the age of the T'ang Dynasty of China. 5) The Upper garments of the open in the center front, the wrap-over to the right, the wrap-over to the left and the round neckline were found in Korea, which mean that the upper garment styles in the Ancient Korea were intermixed of the factors from the West Asia, the central Asia and the East Asia. 6) The styles of costume in the East Asia were influenced by the West Asia through the central Asia. The upper garment styles Europe were also influenced by the West Asia. Thus the upper garment styles in the Ancient East and West had been mutually affected with each other.

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Illiberalism, Post-liberalism, Geopolitics: The EU in Central Asia

  • MAKARYCHEV, ANDREY
    • Acta Via Serica
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    • v.5 no.1
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    • pp.1-22
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    • 2020
  • The paper discusses how the new EU Strategy towards Central Asia issued in May 2019 might be analyzed through the lens of the intensely debated transformations from the liberal to a post-liberal international order. The author claims that the EU's normative power is transforming from the post-Cold War predominantly liberal/ value-based approach, with democracy and human rights at its core, to a set of more technical tools and principles of good governance and effective management of public administration. The paper problematizes a nexus between the dynamics of the EU's nascent post-liberalism and the geopolitical challenges of the EU's growing engagement with illiberal regimes, focuses on direct encounters between the post-liberal EU and the illiberal elites in Central Asia, and seeks to find out the impact of these connections upon the EU's international subjectivity. In this context geopolitical dimensions of EU foreign and security policies, along with the specificity of the EU's geopolitical actorship in Central Asia, are discussed.

A Study on the Conical Hat (고갈형 관모에 관한 연구)

  • 강순제;전현실
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Costume
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    • v.52 no.1
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    • pp.117-128
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    • 2002
  • This paper is extended the meaning and period of CONICAL HAT. That is, the race in Central Asia and Western Asia have worn the conical hat before Scytian appeared. One in conical hat puts on the clothes of two-piece style and has the lifestyle. a horse riding and nomadism. Besides the race originate into the Indo-European language family. On the whole the conical hat has relations with the region and is classified into two groups. Scytian and Klin-Yar style. First. the Scytian style of low hat forms the seam of two-piece and is discovered in Southern Russia. Central Asia and East-Northern Asia. Second, the Klin-Yar style of high hat forms the one piece and generally is discovered in Asia Minor and west of Altai. Until now the moaning of the conical hat has focused on the military. However, one in Central Asia and Western Asia is mostly a king. nobility and god. Therefore, in addition to the meaning of military. I estimate that the conical hat may be expressed as the noble status.

Central Asia and the Republic of Korea: A Sketch on Historical Relations

  • ABDUKHALIMOV, BAKHROM;KARIMOVA, NATALIA
    • Acta Via Serica
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    • v.4 no.2
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    • pp.119-128
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    • 2019
  • This paper attempts to reveal little-known pages from the history of relations between the peoples of Central Asia and Korea based on materials derived from written sources and modern scientific literature, as well as from medieval wall paintings from the early medieval Afrasiab Palace of Varhuman, the ruler of Samarkand, and from stone sculptures of Sogdian figures contained in Silla royal tombs. Korea's interest in the western lands led to its contact with Buddhism, which spread and later flourished in all three Korean kingdoms (Koguryo, Paekche and Silla). The spread of Buddhism in turn motivated a number of Korean monks to undertake pilgrimages to India via Central Asia. Hyecho, a young Silla pilgrim, left evidence of his journey via the South China Sea to India in 723 AD. Paul Pelliot discovered a report from Hyecho's journey entitled Notes on Pilgrimage to Five Regions in India (Wang Wu Tianzhuguo zhuan) in the Dunhuang caves in 1908. Hyecho's contributions are worthy of attention, substantially complementing knowledge available for this little-studied period in the history of South and Central Asia. The information contained in Hyecho's manuscript is, in fact, considered the most significant work of the first half of the 8th century. Research regarding the relationship between Central Asia and Korea remains underdeveloped. Existing historical evidence, however, including the above mentioned Samarkand wall paintings, depicts the visits of two Korean ambassadors to Samarkand, and evidence from Silla tombs suggests the presence of diplomatic relations in addition to trade between the two regions. Overall, the history of the relationship between Central Asia and Korea yields new insights into how and why these distant countries sustained trade and diplomatic and cultural exchange during this early period. Taking into account Korea's growing interest in Uzbekistan, especially in its history and culture, this article can act as a catalyst for studying the history of the two country's relations.

A Study on the Symbolic Significance of the Siberia and Central Asia Shaman's Costume (시베리아와 중앙아시아 제 민족 샤만복식의 상징적 의미에 관한 연구)

  • 이자연
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Costume
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    • v.36
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    • pp.167-181
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    • 1998
  • This paper is the result of research about what imply the symbolic significance of the shamna's costume in Siberia and Central Asia by using plates, medias and exhibitions in JNME. The reselts of the present study are summarized as follows; 1) The researcher define the shamanism as incantation, religious phenomenon centering arround shaman who communicate with the existence of preternatualness by possession or trance. 2) Siberia and Central Asia's shamans are comunicated with the existence of preter naturalness by trance. 3) In Siberia and Central Asia, the shaman's costumes is presented in a shaman ritual are caps, jakets, ornaments, stick and shoes. They symbolize spiritual world, stupendous shaman and powerful animal. 4) A significant symbolic meaning of shaman's costumes is that they change shaman to the existence of preternatualness.

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Epidemiological Evaluation of Breast Cancer in Ecological areas of Kazakhstan - Association with Pollution Emissions

  • Bilyalova, Zarina;Igissinov, Nurbek;Moore, Malcolm;Igissinov, Saginbek;Sarsenova, Samal;Khassenova, Zauresh
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.13 no.5
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    • pp.2341-2344
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    • 2012
  • The aim of the research was to evaluate the incidence of breast cancer in the ecological areas of Kazakhstan and assess the potential. A retrospective study of 11 years (1999 to 2009) was conducted using descriptive and analytical methods. The incidence of breast cancer was the lowest in the Aral-Syr Darya area ($18.6{\pm}0.80$/100,000), and highest in the Irtysh area ($48.9{\pm}1.90$/100,000), with an increasing trends over time in almost all areas. A direct strong correlation between the degree of contamination with high pollution emissions in the atmosphere from stationary sources and the incidence of breast cancer ($r=0.77{\pm}0.15$; p=0.026). The results indicate an increasing importance of breast cancer in Kazakhstan and an etiological role for environmental pollution.

The Return Migration of Koreans in Central Asia to the Russian Far East (중앙아시아 고려인의 러시아 극동 지역 귀환 이주)

  • Lee, Chai-Mun;Park, Kyu-Taeg
    • Journal of the Korean association of regional geographers
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    • v.9 no.4
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    • pp.559-575
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    • 2003
  • The purpose of this study is to systematically explain and discuss the return migration of Koreans in Central Asia to the Russian Far East. The Koreans' return migration is explained by the combination of push and pull factors inherent in the host and home countries. The structural or institutional push factors in Central Asia include the linguistic policy of a country, civil war, ethnic conflicts, while the micro ones are the Koreans' high concern of their children's education and the improvement of a socio-economic status. The macro pull factors operated in the Russian Far East are the permission to use the housing facilities and land previously controlled by military authorities and the laws of recovering the koreans' basic right and honor, while the micro ones are the networks of relatives and friends living in Central Asia and the Russian Far East. The two aspects related to the Koreans' return migration are also discussed. Firstly, the return migration of Koreans in Central Asia is interpreted as a migration of ethnic affinity. Secondly, the establishment of an autonomous district of Koreans in the Russian Far East is discussed.

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A Study of Comparing Shamans' Costumes of the Central Region of Korea with those of Siberia and Central Asia (시베리아·중앙아시아와 한국 중부지방 무속복식의 비교연구)

  • Lee, Ja-Yeon
    • Fashion & Textile Research Journal
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    • v.7 no.4
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    • pp.387-393
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    • 2005
  • This study compares shamans' costumes of Korea with those of Siberia and Central Asia. It also investigates the meaning of shamanism and shamans,the relationship of Korean shamanism to shamanism, and the genealogy of Korean shamanism. For collecting and analyzing data of the research, literature reviews, field studies, and the investigation of historical relics are mostly used. The following are the major findings of the research: Through the comparison of shamans' costumes of Korea with those of Siberia and Central Asia, this research finds out some similarities and differences in the costumes. Both Korean shamans and Siberian and Central Asian shamans wore shaman's costumes and used utensils like bells or mirrors when they perform a religious service. On their costumes, they both used an element which stands for birds. However, they were different in terms of the materials or styles of the costumes, of the function of the costumes, and of the decorating with ornaments. The differences in the materials or styles of the costumes, different functions of the costumes, and using ornaments or not can be viewed as a general phenomenon, which is resulted from different environments. The soul's departing the body or the possession or a mixed method can be considered as mere variations due to regional or cultural differences. In conclusion, based on the comparison of the costumes of shamans of Korea with those of Siberia and Central Asia, the shamans of Korea and Siberia and Central Asia share the same origin. And the genealogy of Korean shamans can be said to be originated from the northern shamanism.

The Construction of the Trans-Central Asian Railroad and Its Current Implications (중앙아시아 횡단철도의 건설과 그 현재적 함의)

  • Lee, Chai-Mun
    • Journal of the Korean association of regional geographers
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    • v.15 no.1
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    • pp.67-85
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    • 2009
  • The Trans-Central Asian Railway consists of the Trans-Caspian Railroad, the Kazalinsk Route, the Turk-Sib, and the Trans-Kazakhstan Trunk Line. Currently, one-fifth of the residents in Central Asia are living around these railroads on which 70% of the economic activities in the region depends. The construction of the railroads in Central Asia was motivated by the Russian Empire's competition 'with its maritime rival, the United Kingdom, over the Eurasian heartland in a geostrategic sense. Using the railroads, the Russian Empire aspired to connect its central industrial regions in European Russia with the remote frontier areas in the Central Asian republics and to increase economic specialization of the region. After the breakdown of the USSR, however, the rail network, which had well been linked among the regions in the former Soviet nations, has been in a deteriorated linkage with their non-Soviet neighboring nations. Despite a lot of problems to be solved, the Trans-Central Asian rail network is expected to play a crucial role as a land bridge between East Asia and Europe as well as between Russia/the Baltic sea and the Indian Ocean/the Persian Gulf in the long-term.

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