• Title, Summary, Keyword: English Class Using Literature

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An Analysis of Empathy Represented in Students' Group Journal of Integrated English Class Using Literature (문학을 활용한 통합영어수업의 학습자 그룹저널에 나타난 공감성 분석)

  • Choi, Minju;Kim, Jeong-ryeol
    • The Journal of the Korea Contents Association
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    • v.18 no.3
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    • pp.228-234
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    • 2018
  • The aim of this study was to analyze the empathy represented in the learners' group journal of integrated English class using literature. 15 high school students participated in this class. In this study, integrated English class using literature was carried out by supplementing the point that amount of the English classes using literature had been focused on reading activities. In addition, not only communicative abilities but also learners' empathy to the main character in the literary was taught. In order to analyze the empathy expressed in learners' group journal, the integrated English class using literature was conducted in the second period and the class was recorded by video. The empathy was based on the community competence mentioned in the 2015 revised curriculum, and learners were asked to write the group journal. As a result of the research, the learners showed an understanding of the context in the novel and learners' group journal showed that their empathy to the main character in the novel. It is expected that the data on the empathy represented in the learner group journal of the integrated English class using literature will be used in English class.

An analysis of the characteristics of communicative English classes using COLT (COLT 수업관찰 분석법을 통한 학교 현장의 의사소통중심 영어 수업 분석)

  • Jeon, Young-Joo
    • English Language & Literature Teaching
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    • v.16 no.3
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    • pp.339-363
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    • 2010
  • The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the English classes in secondary schools in Korea are in terms of communicative nature. After literature study, COLT parts A and B were used to analyze three kinds of English classes: a common class type taught by a school teacher who had won 1st prize at TEE contest, a team teaching class taught by NNS and NS, and a model class taught by a pre-service English teacher. Their communicative English classes were videotaped and transcribed for analysis by COLT. The results of the study revealed that students participated in the classes mostly as a unit and, therefore, did not get many meaningful chances to speak English. Second, creative language-use opportunities were barely found during classes. Third, the group work seemed to be prepared before the class, not to be done during the class. Therefore it is likely to be learned from memorization rather than meaningful communication. These results suggest English classes in schools be more communicatively oriented for successful English learning. Further study should be conducted in order to make English classes more communicative to help students communicate their genuine messages in English and to help teachers teach English efficiently.

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A study of primary school teachers' beliefs on self-directed teaching in primary school English classroom (초등영어 수업에서 자기 주도적 교수에 대한 교사의 인식)

  • Kim, Young-Tae
    • English Language & Literature Teaching
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    • v.12 no.4
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    • pp.159-183
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    • 2006
  • The purpose of this study is to investigate Korean primary school English teachers' beliefs on self-directed teaching and learning for facilitating student's self-directed learning. A survey was conducted, using 315 primary school teachers as participants. According to different school areas, sex, English teaching careers, and types of English teaching like classroom teachers or English specialist teachers, beliefs on teachers' self-directed teaching were studied based on class planning, class process, utilization of human resources, development and utilization of teaching materials and class evaluation. The results of this study are as follows: first, differences were not shown except class planning according to teachers from different school areas. Second, sex and beliefs of teachers' self-directed teaching had nothing in common. Third, differences were shown in class planning and class process, according to English teaching careers. Finally, according to types of English teaching, differences were shown in class process and development and utilization of teaching materials. The study suggests that it is necessary to conduct other studies for observing primary English classrooms focusing on teacher's self-directed decision-making.

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Needs analysis and class design for online tourism English instruction (사이버대학 관광영어 강좌의 학습자 요구분석과 수업설계)

  • Kim, Hyun-Sook;Park, Eun-Young
    • English Language & Literature Teaching
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    • v.17 no.2
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    • pp.115-137
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    • 2011
  • The tourism industry has attained remarkable growth, and the need for professional Tourism English education has increased. Universities of online education can offer an environment for education to both job applicants and laymen who are interested in Tourism English. Tourism English belongs to English for Specific Purposes, which reflects the needs of specific area. The aim of this study is to propose improvements in classes design for online Tourism English instruction. The results of a needs analysis conducted on 160 Korean online university students suggest that online Tourism English class should be different from a traditional classroom-based one in regards to aims, contents, and methods. Online Tourism English class should not only focus on English for specific purposes, but also include more generalized topics. This comes as a result of the diverse backgrounds of online students. The results suggest that extralinguistic elements, such as culture and etiquette differences among English-speaking countries, become more interesting when introduced using pictures, videos, animations, etc. Additionally, SMS or emails can be utilized to raise students' motivation for online Tourism English class.

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Project-based CALL Class: Linking the Theory and Practice

  • Yang, Eun-Mi
    • English Language & Literature Teaching
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    • v.10 no.1
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    • pp.53-76
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    • 2004
  • This paper introduces a class model based on a course, Internet English, offered by an English department at a university. The course has dual purposes of developing students I English skills and Internet using skills at the same time. In support of using the Internet for language learning, the advantages of project-based language learning and constructivist learning in relation to CALL are explored. The activities in this course, which are basically project-based under the paradigm of constructivist learning perspective, are explained in detail to show the relationship between second language learning theory and teaching application. The way how the four language skills - speaking, listening, reading, and writing - are integrated in this class is described as well. Finally, judgmental evaluation of the course by the students is noted. The results show that a project-based CALL class could be a promising class model to realize an integrative, constructivist, and authentic learning.

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The Positive Role of Mother Tongue as Written Form in English Class

  • Lee, Eun-Pyo
    • English Language & Literature Teaching
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    • v.7 no.1
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    • pp.21-34
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    • 2001
  • Using mother tongue in English classroom is controversial. Native speaking instructors seem to be for English-only classes whereas many Korean teachers of English feel it's effective to conduct classes in Korean especially for explaining usages and functions of certain grammar or new vocabulary. In fact, many studies have supported using mother tongue. However, excessive use of it hinders students from practicing the target language. Obviously it doesn't necessarily have to be all or nothing system. The study shows the positive role of mother tongue in written form based on the results of the students' academic performance at Chung-Ang University's summer program 2000. The results indicate that using mother tongue in written form helps beginning level students understand grammar and vocabulary more effectively, leads them to do better on tests than those of English-only class, and encourages them to actively get involved in class discussion and responses.

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Children's Literature in Teaching English As a Foreign Language: A Study of Literary Text Application (아동문학과 영어교육-텍스트 활용 방안에 대한 연구)

  • Kim, Hae-Ri;Kweon, Soo-Ok
    • Journal of English Language & Literature
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    • v.54 no.2
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    • pp.189-215
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    • 2008
  • This study proposes using children's literature as a means of teaching and learning English as a foreign language and suggests practical strategies on the basis of transactional theory of reading suggested by Rosenblatt (1994, 1995). This study suggests three novels written for children or young adults: On My Honor (1986) by Marion Dane Bauer, The Giver (1993) by Lois Lowry and Hatchet (1987) by Gary Paulsen. These texts were selected because of their diverse topics, easy and comprehensible language, engaging stories, and authentic and rich expressions, making them effective materials for foreign language learners. This paper is organized as follows: First, it reviews research on teaching literature in English education and response-oriented language teaching to provide theoretical background of literature-based language teaching and learning. Second, it provides the background of the texts selected for the study. Third, it develops diverse, practical strategies for instructors who intend to use children's literature in EFL teaching. We expect to guide EFL instructors in adopting children's literature in their English class by connecting theory and practice and by providing diverse methods and strategies, and sample responses by EFL university students.

Using English newspapers in high school English reading classes (영자신문 읽기 지도를 활용한 영어 독해능력 향상)

  • Kim, Hye-Ju;Im, Byung-Bin;Park, Jimin;Mun, Chang-Sik
    • English Language & Literature Teaching
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    • v.16 no.3
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    • pp.183-206
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    • 2010
  • The purpose of this study was to investigate whether using English newspapers as supplementary teaching materials for the present textbook could increase students' English reading ability, interest in class and their willingness to take an active part in activities. Schools in rural areas, compared to urban schools, did not have the appropriate resources to teach students effectively. Understanding the disadvantages of the students in rural areas, one idea was to use newspapers to inspire the students to reach outside their local community and incorporate new styles of English and cultural aspects into their lives. The participants were 2nd grade high school students in the rural area. The experimental group received reading lessons with the textbook and English newspapers. They were also encouraged to make their own portfolios. The control group received reading lessons with the textbook and other supplementary materials. Before and after the experiment, reading comprehension tests as well as the questionnaires of interest and self-directed learning were administered. The results of this study were as follows: First, students' English reading ability was significantly improved in the experimental class using English newspapers. Second, students' interest and self-directed learning were positively increased in the same class above.

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The Effects of Teaching University Mathematics in English (대학 수학 교육에서 영어 강의의 효과 연구)

  • Lee, Hae-Moon;Kim, Young-Wook
    • Journal for History of Mathematics
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    • v.20 no.1
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    • pp.83-102
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    • 2007
  • A math class in Korean university was taught in English for one semester and the students' improvement was measured in math content and English proficiency. Pre and post test in 9 week intervals showed that math content loaming in the immersion class was superior to the non-immersed class. Especially, the immersion class showed remarkable improvement in difficult problems among math content test problems. The immersion class improved in math-related English, but not in general English. It is discussed that the particular English expressions for math are hardly separable from the math content knowledge in English because understanding and using those expressions correctly means the students' understanding of math concept in English and thus the math concept itself.

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Developing English listening and speaking skills by using puppetry in elementary schools (초등영어에서 인형극을 활용한 듣기.말하기 능력 향상방안)

  • Im, Byung-Bin;Kim, Yang-Sook
    • English Language & Literature Teaching
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    • v.9 no.2
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    • pp.263-291
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    • 2003
  • This paper is to help the students in elementary schools develop and improve their English listening and speaking skills by presenting effective teaching and learning techniques using puppetry. It is absolutely obvious that listening and speaking are very important skills for most EFL students. Using puppets in the classroom is a creative English teaching technique which can involve authentic, communicative language situations. Moreover, puppets appeal to children and can aid in lowering affective filters thereby creating a more comfortable learning environment. The study clearly showed that using puppets is feasible and enjoyable in elementary English classes. However, caution must be exercised in drawing and generalizing conclusions from this experience. The results of the experiment are as follows: First, using puppetry in the English class was found to have positive influence on students' affective domains (interst, attitude). Second, using puppets in the English classes was found to be efficient for improving students' English listening and speaking skills. Third, appropriate materials should be selected and well thought-out plans should be made to be successful English class using puppetry. Perhaps the most interesting line of future research is to use qualitative research to examine the effect of this technique on the teacher variable. Further research is recommended, especially on using puppetry for speaking proficiency and creating affectively comfortable learning atmospheres.

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