• Title/Summary/Keyword: Euthanasia

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Nurses' Perceptions and Attitudes towards Euthanasia (안락사에 대한 간호사의 인식 및 태도에 관한 연구)

  • Sung, Mi-Hae;Jeon, Jong-Cheol;Mo, Hyung-Joong
    • Asian Oncology Nursing
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    • v.7 no.2
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    • pp.140-149
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    • 2007
  • Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate nurses' perceptions and attitudes towards euthanasia. Method: The subject consisted of 345 nurses from the four general hospitals above 500 beds. Measurement tools were the Ryu's perceptions towards euthanasia, and Park's attitudes toward euthanasia. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-test, and ANOVA by using SPSS WIN 10.0 program. Results: The approval rate of passive euthanasia was 62.6%. Main reason of approval for the passive euthanasia was that euthanasia was "act of mercy". On the other hand, main reason of opposition was that "life is invaluable". 81.2% of subjects responded saying that they would ask for passive euthanasia. The approval rate of active euthanasia was 15.7%. 54.8% of subjects responded saying that they will not ask for active euthanasia. General characteristics significantly related to attitudes to euthanasia were the units, nursing degree, and meaning of euthanasia. The mean score for attitudes to euthanasia was 2.36 and it was negative attitudes. Conclusion: Man has the right to live within his life with dignity. What is most important here seems to be the legalization of euthanasia which still remains unresolved.

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The awareness of medical department students about euthanasia (안락사에 대한 의료계열 학생들의 인식도)

  • Lee, Hyun-Ju;Kim, Jung Sun;Kim, Hoon;Kim, Chul-Tae
    • The Korean Journal of Emergency Medical Services
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    • v.23 no.1
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    • pp.165-178
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    • 2019
  • Purpose: This study examined medical college students' perception of euthanasia and analyzed whether there were significant differences in their perceptions based on their grade, religion, and economic situation. Methods: A questionnaire comprising items relating to students' knowledge about euthanasia, their economic situation relationships with patients, and the extent to which euthanasia would be allowed depending on the patient's condition. Results: Results by age and school year revealed there were no statistically significant differences concerning permissible levels of euthanasia. However, differences were found in the permissible levels of euthanasia according to changes in the patients' condition. Conclusion: It can be interpreted that students' personal values and religion had a great effect on the perception of euthanasia than the process of acquiring medical knowledge. The religion or values they have in your life affect your perception of euthanasia more than the process of acquiring and learning medical knowledge. The suffering of patients is the most important priority and it supports euthanasia on the grounds of relieving psychological distress for patients' families and the right of every patient to die gracefully. Nevertheless, considering the possibility of patient survival and euthanasia being used for murder, it is necessary to legislate the use of euthanasia and have the appropriate qualifications for its administration on patients.

Perceptions and Attitudes of Nurses toward Euthanasia (임상 간호사의 안락사에 대안 인식과 태도)

  • Son Haeng-Mi
    • Journal of Korean Academy of Fundamentals of Nursing
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    • v.11 no.3
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    • pp.309-316
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    • 2004
  • Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify the perceptions and attitudes of nurses toward euthanasia. Method: In this descriptive study, data were collected from 485 nurses using a self-report questionnaire. The attitudes toward euthanasia scales were composed of four sub dimensions; quality of life, client's right, respect for life and medical ethics. The data were analyzed with descriptive and parametric statistics using SPSS WIN program. Results: Of the nurses, 84.7% were in agreement with constituting a law for euthanasia and 57.6% accepted passive euthanasia. Further, 80.1% would accept euthanasia for their own end-of-life situation. The most frequent reason for pro euthanasia was pain relief, and for con, respect for lift. The mean attitude score was 54.64 and that of sub dimensions, were 2.81 for quality of life, 3.21 for client's right, 2.87 for respect for life, and 2.84 for medical ethics. The nurses who were positive in their thinking about euthanasia had higher attitude scores. Among general characteristics of the nurses, attitudes scores were significantly different according to religion. Conclusion: Although many nurses had a positive concept of euthanasia, they still have ethical dilemmas in lift-sustaining care. Therefore training programs on moral rights are necessary to provide guidelines for end-of-life care.

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A study on the Nursing Student's Attitude on Euthanasia (간호대학생의 안락사에 대한 태도 연구)

  • Kim, Chang-Suk
    • Korean Journal of Hospice Care
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    • v.6 no.2
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    • pp.10-18
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    • 2006
  • This study was designed to learn attitudes to euthanasia of nursing student. Data were collected from May 1 to May 30, 2005 by structured questionaires. The respondents joined in the study were 307 nursing student. Data were analyzed using SPSS program by percentage, t-test, one-way ANOVA and scheffe, The results obtained were as follows :1. The mean scores for euthanasia were 3.16 in medical ethics, 2.85 in respect for life, 2.83 in patient's rights, and 2.63 in quality of life, being 2.85 overall. 2. Those who have grade showed significantly higher scores for euthanasia. 3. About 56% of the respondents did not agree that passive euthanasia is justifiable, and 55% did not like performance of euthanasia. 4. The group admitting that passive euthanasia is ethically justifiable showed significantly higher scores in the patient's rights(t=6.031, p=.000), the respect for life(t=5.280, p=.000) and the medical ethics(t=5.558, p=.000) than the group which do not admit. 5. The group which would perform passive euthanasia showed significantly higher scores in the patient's rights(t=6.329, p=.000), the respect for life(t=6.339, p=.000), the quality of life (t=1.993, p=.047) and the medical ethics(t=6.240, p=.000) than the group which would not perform passive euthanasia.

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Euthanasia (안락사)

  • Hong, Young-Seon;Yeom, Chang-Hwan;Lee, Kyung-Shik
    • Journal of Hospice and Palliative Care
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    • v.2 no.1
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    • pp.1-6
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    • 1999
  • Background : Euthanasia is defined as "a deliberate intervention undertaken with express intention of ending a life so as to relieve intractable suffering". There have been keen debates in the medical literatures on the questions relating to the legalisation and the provision of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. Methods : Literatures on the debate of euthanasia published during the last several years were reviewed, and the indications used in performing euthanasia were listed. And the results of a more liberal policy on euthanasia in Netherland were introduced. Results : Other clinical practices are sometimes described as euthanasia but can be distinguished by examination of ethical principles involved. The guidelines for the practice of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide in the Netherlands were inadquate and were abused, while the Remmelink Committee Report said that euthanasia in the Netherland had been adequate. Conclusions : There are no clinical situations necessitating the legalisation of euthanasia or physician assisted suicide. Comprehensive and mutidisciplinary palliative care can effectively relieve much of the suffering of the terminally ill that is presently cited as justification for euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide.

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General Population's View on Euthanasia (안락사에 대한 일반인들의 인식도)

  • Kim, Sun-Hyun;Lee, Hye-Ree
    • Journal of Hospice and Palliative Care
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    • v.6 no.2
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    • pp.133-143
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    • 2003
  • Purpose : Amont the various issues concerning bio-ethics, the concern on euthanasia has increased along with the development of medical technology. Thus, the general public tends to have more liberal opinion. They have detail research data and real practices in US, Europe and Australia, but we lack such studies in our country. This study was undertaken to address the need of studies on the recognition of euthanasia among the public because the existing studies have been focused on the medical staff. Methods : Survey 413 people the age of 17 or more, from May to July 2000. Testify the data on the variation of demography and the recognition of euthanasia by using SAS 6.12, the statistic program. Results : 304 people (73.6%) think that euthanasia should be legislated, 156 people (37.8%) permit euthanasia to the rage of voluntary one, and 234 people (56.6%) permit passive euthanasia. When the subject of voluntary euthanasia was himself, more people whose age is 35 or more (P=0.001) responded that they will undertake euthanasia. And, on issues related to the passive euthanasia, one's educational background (P=0.046) and economic power (P=0.040) arrangement showed significant differences. When the subject of voluntary euthanasia is other people, more people whose age is 35 or more than 35 (P=0.001), whose sex is male (P=0.001), and married people (P=0.002) were for allowing the matter. For the subject of passive euthanasia, survey participant's occupation (P=0.016) created meaningful difference. More people whose age is 35 or more than 35 responded that they want voluntary euthanasia for themselves (P=0.001), and in the case when euthanasia is legislated, marital status (P=0.002) also shows meaningful difference. Passive euthanasia is permitted by the more people whose age is less than 35 for respondents other people (P=0.001), marital status show meaningful difference in case for respondent himself. In the case of legal euthanasia is more people whose age is 35 or more than 35 (P=0.001), sex is male (P=0.004) and more married people (P=0.001) responded that they want voluntary euthanasia for other people. And, age (P=0.002), sex (P=0.001), education (P=0.025) and economic power (P=0.001) show meaningful difference for case the subject of passive euthanasia. Conclusion : Most of general public responded that the legislation on euthanasia is required; and, age, education and economic power seem to have an influence on their decisions on euthanasia. Not only such a study of demographic and sociological correlation; but, various basic data on the legislation of euthanasia are needed.

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Death with Dignity and the Right to Decide (생명권과 자기결정권, 그리고 의사의 진료의무)

  • Yoo, Seung-Ryong
    • The Korean Society of Law and Medicine
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    • v.9 no.2
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    • pp.11-52
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    • 2008
  • Based on foreign examples and past debates, the minimal conditions for passive euthanasia can be suggested as following; (1) The patient is incurable by modem medical practice and his death is impending (less than 6 months), (2) Euthanasia is practiced solely to relieve physical pain of the patient, (3) If the patient can express his will, there should be a clear and sincere request or consent, (4) More than 2 doctors including doctor in charge should consent, (5) Euthanasia should be practiced in ethical way, (6) Patient family should agree(when the patient will is assumed.) It is hard to resolve issues regarding euthanasia based on past rulings and cases without concrete law. As in United States and Germany, clear and objective provisions of euthanasia and definitive method for patient's advanced directive should be legislated to resolve medical conflict and to relieve patient and family from agony. And death with dignity debate will not be able to proceed if it is only substantively approached because of unclear definition of euthanasia and benefit comparison way of thinking. Thus it is important to establish definitive process to decided legislation of euthanasia act and resolving conflicts arising from each step of the process among interested parties exchanging medical/ethical opinions.

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A Study on Attitude to Euthanasia by Student Nurses (간호대학생의 안락사에 대한 태도)

  • Kim So-Nam
    • Journal of Korean Academy of Fundamentals of Nursing
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    • v.9 no.3
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    • pp.473-483
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    • 2002
  • The purpose of this study was to explore the attitude of student nurses to euthanasia. The convenient sample for this study consisted of 293 nursing students at a nursing college in Kyeongi Province. The data were collected from Oct. 15, 2002 to Oct. 30, 2002 and were analyzed using frequency, percentage, and $X^2$-test with the SAS package. The results of this study are as follow : 77.1% of students agreed to passive euthanasia and 70.6% subjects agreed to legalization of passive euthanasia. 78.5% of students can given an exact explanation of the concept of hospice. They obtained information about hospice from the mass media (1.1%), books (30.0%), friends and neighbors (3.4%), and religious groups (2.4%). The preferred place for death was reported to be home (75.4%), hospital (9.4%) or a peaceful place (6.3%). Fears of facing death were suffering in death (23.4%), grief of remaining family (21.2%), unknown about the other world (10.0%), separation from people who are loved (9.7%), forgotten from the people's memory(6.3%). In conclusion, the attitude of student nurses toward passive euthanasia approached a positive direction. But euthanasia was seen as dangerous and having multiple problems. Therefore the training for student nurses as health professionals should include content on dealing with hospice care and euthanasia.

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The Effects of Attitude to Death and Spiritual Well-being on Attitude to Euthanasia in University Students (대학생의 죽음에 대한 태도, 영적안녕이 안락사에 대한 태도에 미치는 영향)

  • Park, Min-Jeong;Chung, Mi-Young
    • Journal of the Korea Convergence Society
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    • v.11 no.5
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    • pp.391-398
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    • 2020
  • The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of attitude to death, spiritual well-being on attitude to euthanasia of university students. The data were collected from 265 subjects using a structured self-report questionnaires and analyzed using SPSS WIN version 23.0. The mean score of attitude to death, spiritual well-being, and attitude to euthanasia were 2.75, 3.69, and 3.15. Attitudes to euthanasia did not correlate with attitudes toward death, and negatively correlated with spiritual well-being. Religious well-being was a influencing factors on attitude to euthanasia and explained 12.7% of attitude to euthanasia. This means that the higher the religious well-being, the lower the attitude to euthanasia of university students. Therefore, religious well-being should be considered in discussing euthanasia of university students.

The Study of Meaning in Euthanasia and Hospiece Nursing among Nurses (간호사의 안락사와 임종 간호에 대한 의미분석)

  • Kim Ae-Kyung;Park Gye-Sun
    • Journal of Korean Academy of Fundamentals of Nursing
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    • v.7 no.3
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    • pp.379-390
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    • 2000
  • Euthanasia have received considerable attention recentely in medical literature, public discussion, and proposed state legislation. Almost all the discussion in this area has focused on the role of physicians. However, nurse may be in special position to understand the wishes of patients and to act on this understanding. Purpose of this study is to identity the meaning of euthanasia in terminal ill patients on the nurses' veiw. Forcused interveiw design was used to data collection The data were analyzed by semantic analysis, and analysis of the data resulted in identification of 14 categories representing the meaning of euthanasia. 1. The meaning of supported euthanasia is 'free of suffering', 'difficulty of economic status', 'right of patient and family', 'dignity of death', 'organ transplant', 'social legislation'. 2. The meaning of opposited euthanasia is 'artificial death', 'value of life', 'uncertainity', 'guilt feeling' 3. The meaning of care in terminalily ill patients is 'avoidance', 'powerlessness'. 'apathy'. 'passive attitude'. The policy debate about professional roles in action that end of lives of patients must be extended nurses. Nurses must take an active role in discussion and definition of acceptable practice at the end of life.

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