• Title, Summary, Keyword: Fatty Acid Profile

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Effect of Different Vegetable Oils on Growth and Fatty Acid Profile of Rohu (Labeo rohita, Hamilton); Evaluation of a Return Fish Oil Diet to Restore Human Cardio-protective Fatty Acids

  • Karanth, Santhosh;Sharma, Prakash;Pal, Asim K.;Venkateshwarlu, G.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.22 no.4
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    • pp.565-575
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    • 2009
  • Two experiments in the sequential order were conducted to determine the effects of different dietary lipid sources on the growth and fatty acid composition of rohu (Labeo rohita) and to examine the viability of a return fish oil finisher diet in restoring the human cardio-protective fatty acid profile. In the first experiment, fish were fed either with coconut oil (D1), olive oil (D2), sunflower oil (D3), linseed oil (D4) and fish oil (D5) as the main lipid source in the isonitrogenous diet for 90 days. No significant differences in growth were observed. Among the experimental diets moisture content of fish varied significantly (p<0.05) between the groups. Dietary lipid sources had a profound influence on the fatty acid profile of the muscle and liver as tissue fatty acid profile reflected the dietary fatty acid composition. Increased amounts of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid were observed in tissue of fish fed D4 and arachidonic acid was observed in the tissue of fish fed D3. We have also detected the metabolites of n-3 and n-6 pathway in D4 and D3 groups respectively, which prompted us to conclude that rohu, can desaturate and elongate $C_{18}$ essential fatty acids to $C_{20}$ and $C_{22}$ HUFA. A second feeding trial was conducted using the animals from the five different treatment groups for the duration of 30 days with fish oil rich diet (D5). Feeding with fish-oil rich washout diet resulted in the near equalization of all the other treatment groups tissue fatty acid profiles to that of fish oil (D5) fed group. These results indicate that a finishing fish oil diet can be effectively used to restore the human cardioprotective fatty acid profile in rohu fed with vegetable oils as lipid source.

Changes in Fatty Acid Profile of Breast and Thigh Muscle of Old Laying Hens as Transferred from Cage to Backyard Raising System (케이지 사육에서 방사사육으로 전환한 산란노계의 가슴살과 대퇴부살에 포함된 지방산 함량의 비교 조사)

  • Kim, Chang-Man;Choi, Jung-Hoon;Choi, In-Hag
    • Journal of Environmental Science International
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    • v.21 no.6
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    • pp.763-768
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    • 2012
  • The objective of this study was undertaken to investigate changes in fatty acid profile of breast and thigh muscle of old laying hens as transferred from cage to backyard raising system and to provide basic information on using old laying hens to producers for environmental managements. Overall, percentages of unsaturated fatty acid obtained from breast and thigh muscle with cage and backyard raising system are the most abundant, followed by saturated fatty acid. For breast muscle, there were no differences (P>0.05) between cage rearing system and backyard raising system in saturated fatty acid (SFA) and mono unsaturated fatty acid (MUFA). Poly unsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) and PUFA:SFA ratios were significantly higher in backyard raising systems in comparison with cage rearing systems (P<0.05). No differences (P>0.05) were detected between both rearing systems for MUFA, PUFA, and PUFA:SFA ratios with thigh muscles. SFA in thigh muscle was significantly (P<0.05) higher in cage rearing systems compared with backyard raising systems. In conclusion, using breast and thigh muscle meats from old laying hens as functional foods or investigating impact assessment on the improvement of farm management system may serve as a good management practice to encourage producers.

Effects of Dietary Canola Oil on Growth, Feed Efficiency, and Fatty Acid Profile of Bacon in Finishing Pigs and of Longissimus Muscle in Fattening Horses

  • Joo, Eun-Sook;Yang, Young-Hoon;Lee, Seung-Chul;Lee, Chong-Eon;Cheoung, Chang-Cho;Kim, Kyu-Il
    • Nutritional Sciences
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    • v.9 no.2
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    • pp.92-96
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    • 2006
  • Studies were carried out to determine the effect of feeding diet containing 5% canola oil on growth, feed efficiency, and fatty acid profile of bacon in finishing pigs and of longissimus muscle in horses fattening for meat production. In experiment 1, twenty cross-bred barrows and twenty cross-bred gilts (average weight, 80 kg) were blocked by sex and weight, and five barrows or five gilts were allotted to one of eight pens $(6.25m^2/pen)$, respectively. Four pens (two with barrows and two with gilts) randomly selected were assigned to a control diet containing 5% tallow and the remaining four pens to a diet containing 5% canola oil. The average daily weight gain, daily feed intake and feed efficiency over a 6-wk feeding period were not different (p>0.05) between the two diets, nor was backfat thickness. Fatty acid profile in bacon fat showed that the 0-3 fatty acid ($\alpha-linolenic$ acid) content in pigs fed diet containing 5% canola oil was approximately three times (P<0.01) as much as in pigs fed tallow. In experiment 2, thirty-two Jeju horses (average $weight{\pm}SE,\;244{\pm}5kg$) were blocked by sex and weight, and two horses of the same sex and similar body weight were allotted to one $(15m^2/pen)$ of eight pens. Eight pens (four with males and four with females) selected randomly were assigned to a control diet containing 5% tallow and the remaining eight pens to a diet containing 5% canola oil. The average daily weight gain, daily feed intake and feed efficiency for concentrates without roughages over a 5-month feeding period were not different (P>0.05) between the two diet groups. Fatty acid profile in the muscle fat showed that the 0-3 fatty acid (a-linolenic acid) content in horses fed diet containing 5% canola oil was approximately two times (P<0.01) that in horses fed tallow. The increased (P<0.01) 0-3 fatty acid content in pigs and horses fed canola oil decreased the ratio of n-6 to n-3 fatty acids compared to the control, indicating a significant improvement in pork and horsemeat fatty acid profile for health benefit. Our study demonstrated that feeding diet containing 5% canola oil may help produce pork and horsemeat with more health benefit, increasing their $\alpha-linolenic$ acid content without deleterious effects on growth of pigs and horses.

Fatty Acid Profiles of Marine Benthic Microorganisms Isolated from the Continental Slope of Bay of Bengal: A Possible Implications in the Benthic Food Web

  • Das, Surajit;Lyla, P.S.;Khan, S. Ajmal
    • Ocean Science Journal
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    • v.42 no.4
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    • pp.247-254
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    • 2007
  • Marine bacteria, actionmycetes and fungal strains were isolated from continental slope sediment of the Bay of Bengal and studied for fatty acid profile to investigate their involvement in the benthic food-web. Fifteen different saturated and unsaturated fatty acids from bacterial isolates, 14 from actinomycetes and fungal isolates were detected. The total unsaturated fatty acids in bacterial isolates ranged from 11.85 to 37.26%, while the saturated fatty acid ranged between 42.34 and 80.74%. In actinomycetes isolates, total unsaturated fatty acids varied from 27.86 to 38.85% and saturated fatty acids ranged from 35.29 to 51.25%. In fungal isolates unsaturated fatty acids ranged between 44.62 and 65.52% while saturated FA ranged from 20.80 to 46.30%. The higher percentages of unsaturated fatty acids from the microbial isolates are helpful in anticipating the active participation in the benthic food-web of Bay of Bengal.

Fatty Acid Profiles of Ten Muscles from High and Low Marbled (Quality Grade 1++ and 2) Hanwoo Steers

  • Hwang, Young-Hwa;Joo, Seon-Tea
    • Food Science of Animal Resources
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    • v.36 no.5
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    • pp.679-688
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    • 2016
  • The aim of this research was to evaluate: 1) the fatty acid profile of ten muscles from high marbled (HM, quality grade 1++) and low marbled (LM, quality grade 2) Hanwoo carcass, 2) the relationship between the fatty acid profile and sensory traits. There were significant (p<0.001) differences in fat content and fatty acid composition among the 10 muscles obtained from HM and LM Hanwoo steers. The proportions of SFA (saturated fatty acid), MUFA (monounsaturated fatty acid) and PUFA (polyunsaturated fatty acid) were significantly (p<0.001) different among the 10 muscles due to differences in all fatty acids except eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5n-3). The high-fat muscles had a lower n-6/n-3 ratio compared to the low-fat muscles (p<0.001). LM muscles had a significantly (p<0.05) higher proportion of SFA than HM muscles due to a higher proportion of stearic acid (C18:0). On the contrary, HM muscles had a significantly (p<0.01) higher proportion of MUFA than LM muscles due to higher oleic acid (C18:1n-9) proportion. SFA had a significant correlation with CIE a* (r=0.281; p<0.01) and drip loss (%) (r=−0.233; p<0.001). Cooking loss (%) had a significantly (p<0.05) negative correlation with PUFA (r=−0.233; p<0.05). Overall palatability was positively correlated with SFA (r=0.262; p<0.01), but negatively correlated with PUFA (r=−0.567; p<0.001). There was no significant correlation between oleic acid and any of the sensory traits (p>0.05).

Variation on Fatty Acid Profile Including ${\gamma}-Linolenic$ acid among Hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) Accessions (대마 유전자원의 지방산 조성과 감마리놀렌산 함량변이)

  • Moon, Youn-Ho;Song, Yeon-Sang;Jeong, Byeong-Choon;Bang, Jin-Ki
    • Korean Journal of Medicinal Crop Science
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    • v.13 no.4
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    • pp.190-193
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    • 2005
  • Hemp is cultivated to produce fiber and seeds for extracting vegetable oil. This study was carried out to obtain reliable data on fatty acid profile including ${\gamma}-linolenic$ acid (GLA) in seeds of hemp accessions with regard to suitability for both human nutrition and pharmaceutical purposes. The ratio of unsaturated fatty acid including ${\alpha}-linolenic$ acid were high but saturated fatty acid including palmitic acid were low in the seeds of hemp accessions, perilla and evening primrose. The ratio of GLA in fatty acid profile of evening primrose and hemp seeds were 12.5% and 2.1 %, respectively but not detected in perilla seeds. In the fatty acid profile of hemp seeds accessions, the range and coefficient of variation of GLA were $0.8%{\sim}3.8%$ and 42.9%, respectively which are highest among the fatty acid. Among the major characteristics and fatty acid ratios, flowering date and ${\alpha}-linolenic$ acid showed highly positive correlation but not showed any significant correlation between THC (Tetrahydrocannabinol) and any fatty acids. Among the fatty acid ratios, negative correlation were showed between palmitic acid and ${\gamma}-linolenic$ acid, and showed highly negative correlation between oleic acid and ${\alpha}-linolenic$ acid, linoleic acid and a-linolenic acid. The accessions of high GLA ratio were originated from Europe including Central Russia, and were short in flowering date and stem height.

Alteration of the Fatty Acid Profile of Pork by Dietary Manipulation

  • Morel, P.C.H.;McIntosh, J.C.;Janz, J.A.M.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.19 no.3
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    • pp.431-437
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    • 2006
  • This work was undertaken to study the effect of dietary fat source on the fatty acid profile of pork, and to evaluate the effect of inclusion of vitamin E in pig diets on lipid oxidation of pork tissue and processed pork products. Fifty-six pigs were allocated to four treatments, that included two dietary fat sources and two levels of vitamin E inclusion. Dietary fat was derived from either tallow, a source of saturated fatty acids (SFA), or from a mixture of soybean and linseed oils, which contain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Vitamin E was included at either 0% or 0.011% of the diet. Growth and carcass characteristics were not affected by the dietary treatments. Dietary fat source affected the fatty acid profile of the longissimus muscle and subcutaneous fat tissue, with the PUFA diet resulting in significantly more polyunsaturated fatty acids in the tissues, and more favourable ratios of SFA to PUFA and C18:2 to C18:3 in terms of human health considerations. Lipid oxidation was significantly greater in tissues and processed products from PUFA-fed pigs. Inclusion of vitamin E in the diets, however, reduced the extent of lipid oxidation in the meat and meat products. Dietary manipulation of the fatty acid profile of pigs is an effective means of altering the fat composition of pork in order to provide human consumers with a healthy product. Vitamin E is effective as an antioxidant agent, particularly where processed products are concerned.

Comparison of fatty acid composition of Staphylococcus sp isolated from bovine mastitis milk (유방염 감염 우유에서 분리된 Staphylococcus sp의 지방산 조성 비교)

  • Kim, Soon-Tae;Kim, Sin;Kim, Sang-Young;Son, Jae-Kweon
    • Korean Journal of Veterinary Service
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    • v.20 no.1
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    • pp.37-45
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    • 1997
  • The result of API staph-ident system was compared with cellular fatty acid composition for the identification of Staphylococcus species isolated from cattle. Isolated strains from cattle were correctly identified to S aureus, S intermedius, S hyicus, S simulans, S saprophyticus, S epidemis, S sciuri and S xylosus by API staph-ident system. The correlation between bacterial cellular fatty acid profile and Staphylococcus species isolated to API STAPH-IDENT system were. In conclusion, the result presented indicate that Staphylococci can be indentified to the species level by the cellular fatty acid profiles. Moreover, computerized fatty acid profile correlative anaylsis can be applied for determining identify of Staphylococcus species.

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Fatty Acid Concentration of Serum Phospholipids in Normal and Glaucoma Patients (정상인과 녹내장 환자의 혈청 인지질 지방산 농도)

  • Chung, Hae-Yun
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Food Culture
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    • v.35 no.2
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    • pp.224-232
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    • 2020
  • Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide and is characterized by degeneration of the optic nerve. Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is the major contributing factor to optic nerve damage. However, some patients develop glaucoma even with normal IOP. Other factors, including age, race, myopia, and nutrition, can affect glaucoma risk. Dietary fat intake and serum fatty acid composition are closely related with the fatty acid profile of the retina and thus can modulate glaucoma risk. In this study, we collected serum samples from 34 glaucoma patients (26 primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) and 8 normal tension glaucoma (NTG)) and 45 healthy controls and analyzed their serum phospholipid fatty acid concentrations. The results show that the ratio of oleic acid to stearic acid (OA/SA), which is an indicator of stearoyl-CoA desaturase activity, was higher in POAG patients when compared to normal controls. The ratio of eicosapentaenoic acid to arachidonic acid (EPA/AA), which is an indirect marker of eicosanoid biosynthesis, was also higher in glaucoma patients (p=0.048). These results imply that dietary fatty acid intake and serum fatty acid profile can influence glaucoma risk. Additional study is necessary to identify the relationship between fatty acids and glaucoma.

Seamustard (Undaria pinnatifida) Improves Growth, Immunity, Fatty Acid Profile and Reduces Cholesterol in Hanwoo Steers

  • Hwang, J.A.;Islam, M.M.;Ahmed, S.T.;Mun, H.S.;Kim, G.M.;Kim, Y.J.;Yang, C.J.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.27 no.8
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    • pp.1114-1123
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    • 2014
  • The study was designed to evaluate the effect of 2% seamustard (Undaria pinnatifida) by-product (SW) on growth performance, immunity, carcass characteristics, cholesterol content and fatty acid profile in Hanwoo steers. A total of 20 Hanwoo steers (ave. 22 months old; 619 kg body weight) were randomly assigned to control (basal diet) and 2% SW supplemented diet. Dietary SW supplementation significantly (p<0.05) improved average daily gain and gain:feed ratio as well as serum immunoglobulin G concentration. Chemical composition and quality grade of meat and carcass yield grades evaluated at the end of the trial were found to be unaffected by SW supplementation. Dietary SW significantly reduced meat cholesterol concentration (p<0.05). Dietary SW supplementation significantly reduced the myristic acid (C14:0) and palmitoleic acid (C16:ln-7) concentration, while SW increased the concentration of stearic acid (C18:0) and linolenic acid (C18:3n-3) compared to control (p<0.05). Dietary SW supplementation had no effect on saturated fatty acids (SFA), unsaturated fatty acids, poly unsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) or mono unsaturated fatty acid content in muscles. A reduced ratio of PUFA/SFA and n-6/n-3 were found in SW supplemented group (p<0.05). In conclusion, 2% SW supplementation was found to improve growth, immunity and fatty acid profile with significantly reduced cholesterol of beef.