• Title, Summary, Keyword: Genetic Correlations

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Estimation of Genetic Correlations for the Growth and Carcass Traits in Hanwoo (한우의 성장형질과 도체형질에 대한 유전상관 추정)

  • Park, C.J.;Park, Y.I.
    • Journal of Animal Science and Technology
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    • v.44 no.6
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    • pp.685-692
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    • 2002
  • This study was carried out to estimate the genetic correlations for the carcass and growth traits of Hanwoo bulls measured at 12 and 18 months of age on the basis of the data form 1,823 heads of Hanwoo bulls raised at the Livestock Improvement Main Center from 1991 to 1998. Genetic correlations were estimated with multiple trait animal model using MTDFREML. The genetic correlations of the body weight at 12 months with average daily gain during 6${\sim}$12 months and with the body length were 0.76 and 0.79, respectively. The genetic correlations of the body weight at 18 months with average daily gain during 6${\sim}$18 months and with the body length were 0.86 and 0.82, respectively. The genetic correlations of the carcass weight with dressing percent, eye muscle area, backfat thickness and carcass length were 0.39, 0.37, 0.44 and 0.63, respectively. And estimate of 0.36 was obtained for the genetic correlation between backfat thickness and marbling score. The high and positive genetic correlations of 0.71 and 0.96 were estimated for the carcass weight with the body weights at 12 and 18 months. The genetic correlations of the carcass weight with body lengths at 12 and 18 months were 0.63 and 0.75, respectively. Positive genetic correlations were estimated for the dressing percentage with the body weight, average daily gain, body length, thurls width and chest girth. Low genetic correlations were estimated between eye muscle area and the growth traits ranging from -0.07 to 0.32. Dressing percentage was low correlated genetically with the growth traits except for the chest girth at 18 months. The genetic correlation between marbling score and chest girth at 18 months estimated was 0.25.

ESTIMATES OF GENETIC PARAMETERS OF SOME GROWTH TRAITS IN JERSEY CATTLE

  • Khan, R.N.;Akhtar, S.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.8 no.6
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    • pp.567-570
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    • 1995
  • Data from 178 Jersey calves born at Livestock Experiment Station were analyzed to obtain estimates of heritability, genetic and phenotypic correlations of some growth traits. Sex-specific variance and covariance components were estimated for birth weight (BWT), 180-d weight (WWT), 365-d weight (YWT), birth to weaning daily gain (BWG), weaning to yearling daily gain (WYG) and brith to yearling gain (BYG). Heritabilities, genetic and phenotypic correlations were generally higher in males than females. Heritabilities estimated for males and females respectively were 0.98 and 0.49 for BWT; 0.70 and 0.76 for WWT; 0.71 and 0.26 for YWT. Genetic correlations were higher than phenotypic correlations in all the treats studied.

Genetic Parameters of Milk Yield and Milk Fat Percentage Test Day Records of Iranian Holstein Cows

  • Shadparvar, A.A.;Yazdanshenas, M.S.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.18 no.9
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    • pp.1231-1236
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    • 2005
  • Genetic parameters for first lactation milk production based on test day (TD) records of 56319 Iranian Holstein cows from 655 herds that first calved between 1991 and 2001 were estimated with restricted maximum likelihood method under an Animal model. Traits analyzed were milk yield and milk fat percentage. Heritability for TD records were highest in second half of the lactation, ranging from 0.11 to 0.19 for milk yield and 0.038 to 0.094 for milk fat percentage respectively. Estimates for lactation records for these traits were 0.24 and 0.26 respectively. Genetic correlations between individual TD records were high for consecutive TD records (>0.9) and decreased as the interval between tests increased. Estimates of genetic correlations of TD yield with corresponding lactation yield were highest (0.78 to 0.86) for mid-lactation (TD3 to TD8). Phenotypic correlations were lower than corresponding genetic correlations, but both followed the same pattern. For milk fat percentage no clear pattern was found. Results of this study suggested that TD yields especially in mid-lactation may be used for genetic evaluation instead of 305-day yield.

Indigenous Thai Beef Cattle Breeding Scheme Incorporating Indirect Measures of Adaptation: Sensitivity to Changes in Heritabilities of and Genetic Correlations between Adaptation Traits

  • Kahi, A.K.;Graser, H.U.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.17 no.8
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    • pp.1039-1046
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    • 2004
  • A model Indigenous Thai beef cattle breeding structure consisting of nucleus, multiplier and commercial units was used to evaluate the effect of changes in heritabilities of and genetic correlations between adaptation traits on genetic gain and profitability. A breeding objective that incorporated adaptation was considered. Two scenarios for improving both the production and the adaptation of animals where also compared in terms of their genetic and economic efficiency. A base scenario was modelled where selection is for production traits and adaptation is assumed to be under the forces of natural selection. The second scenario (+Adaptation) included all the information available for base scenario with the addition of indirect measures of adaptation. These measures included tick count (TICK), faecal egg count (FEC) and rectal temperature (RECT). Therefore, the main difference between these scenarios was seen in the records available for use as selection criteria and hence the level of investments. Additional genetic gain and profitability was generated through incorporating indirect measures of adaptation as criteria measured in the breeding program. Unsurprisingly, the results were sensitive to the changes in heritabilities and genetic correlations between adaptation traits. However, there were more changes in the genetic gain and profitability of the breeding program when the genetic correlations of adaptation and its indirect measures were varied than when the correlations between these measures were. The changes in the magnitudes of the genetic gain and profit per cow stresses the importance of using reliable estimates of these traits in any breeding program.

Genetic and Phenotypic Parameter Estimates of Body Weight at Different Ages and Yearling Fleece Weight in Markhoz Goats

  • Rashidi, A.;Sheikahmadi, M.;Rostamzadeh, J.;Shrestha, J.N.B.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.21 no.10
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    • pp.1395-1403
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    • 2008
  • The objective of the present study was to estimate genetic parameters for economic traits in Markhoz goats. Data collected from 1993 to 2006 by the Markhoz goat Performance Testing Station in Sanandaj, Iran, were analyzed. The traits recorded as body weight performance at birth (BW), weaning (WW), six month (6MW), nine month (9MW), yearling (YW) and yearling fleece weight (YFW) were investigated. Least square analyses were used for estimation of environmental effects. Genetic parameters were estimated with single and multi trait analysis using restricted maximum likelihood (REML) procedures, under animal models. By ignoring or including maternal additive genetic effects and maternal permanent environmental effects, five different models were fitted for each trait. The effects of sex, type of birth, age of dam and year of birth on the all body weights were significant (p<0.01), but had no effects on YFW except year of birth. Age of kids had significant influences on WW and 6MW (p<0.01). A log likelihood ratio test was carried out for choosing the most suitable model for each trait. Total heritability estimates for YFW and growth traits varied from 0.16 for YFW and WW to 0.41 for YW. For all traits, maternal heritability was lower than direct heritability, ranging from 0.06 for BW to 0.01 for 6MW and 9MW. The magnitude of $c^2$ was more substantial for BW than the others, and relative importance was reduced from 0.12 for BW to 0.04 for 9MW. The direct additive genetic correlations estimates were positive and varied from 0.21 between BW-YW to 0.96 between WW-6MW. Direct additive genetic correlations between YFW and body weight traits were positive and ranged from 0.14 between BW-YFW to 0.67 between 6MW-YFW. For all traits, the corresponding estimates for phenotypic correlation were positive and lower than genetic correlations. The maternal additive genetic correlations between various traits were varied and ranged from -0.19 between 9MW-YFW to 0.96 between 6MW-9MW. The estimates of the maternal permanent environmental correlations between various traits were positive and ranged from 0.33 between WW-YFW to 0.93 between WW-6MW. Also, the environmental correlations between various traits ranged from 0.01 between BW-YFW and WW-YFW to 0.70 between 9MW-YW. Estimates of genetic parameters for various traits in this study confirm that selection should be applied on WW for genetic improvement in Markhoz goats.

Genetic Persistency of First Lactation Milk Yield Estimated Using Random Regression Model for Indian Murrah Buffaloes

  • Geetha, E.;Chakravarty, A.K.;Vinaya Kumar, K.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.19 no.12
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    • pp.1696-1701
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    • 2006
  • A random regression model was applied for the first time for the analysis of test day records and to study the genetic persistency of first lactation milk yield of Indian Murrah buffaloes. Wilmink's Function was chosen to describe the shape of lactation curves. Heritabilities of test day milk yield varied from 0.33 to 0.58 in different test days. The highest heritability was found in the initial test day ($5^{th}$ day) milk yield. Genetic correlations among test day milk yields were higher in the initial test day milk yield and decreased when the test day interval was increased. The magnitude of genetic correlations between test day and 305 day milk yield varied from 0.25 to 0.99. The genetic persistencies of first lactation milk yield were estimated based on daily breeding values using two methods. $P_1$ is the genetic persistency estimated as a summation of the deviation of estimated daily breeding value on days to attain peak yield from each day after days to attain peak yield to different lactation days. $P_2$ is the genetic persistency estimated as the additional genetic yield (gained or lost) from days to attain peak yield to estimated breeding value on different lactation days relative to an average buffalo having the same yield on days to attain peak yield. The mean genetic persistency on 90, 120, 180, 240, 278 and 305 days in milk was estimated as -4.23, -21.67, -101.67, -229.57, -330.06 and -388.64, respectively by $P_1$, whereas by $P_2$ on same days in milk were estimated as -3.96 (-0.32 kg), -23.94 (-0.87 kg), -112.81 (-1.96 kg), -245.83 (-2.81 kg), -350.04 (-3.28 kg) and -407.58 (-3.40 kg) respectively. Higher magnitude of rank correlations indicated that the ranking of buffaloes based on their genetic persistency in both methods were similar for evaluation of genetic persistency of buffaloes. Based on the estimated range of genetic persistency three types of genetic persistency were identified. Genetic correlations among genetic persistency in different days in milk and between genetic persistencies on the same day in milk were very high. The genetic correlations between genetic persistency for different days in milk and estimated breeding value for 305 DIM was increased from 90 DIM to 180 DIM, and highest around 240 DIM which indicates a minimum of 240 days as an optimum first lactation length might be required for genetic evaluation of Indian Murrah buffaloes.

Genetic and phenotypic relationships of live body measurement traits and carcass traits in crossbred pigs of Korea

  • Do, Chang-Hee;Park, Chan-Hyuk;Wasana, Nidarshani;Choi, Jae-Gwan;Park, Su-Bong;Kim, Si-Dong;Cho, Gyu-Ho;Lee, Dong-Hee
    • Korean Journal of Agricultural Science
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    • v.41 no.3
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    • pp.229-236
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    • 2014
  • This study presents the estimates of heritabilities of body measurement traits and carcass traits, and genetic and phenotypic correlations of those traits for crossbred pigs in Korea. Body and ultrasound (A mode: Piglog 105) measurements in 221 pigs including body weight, length, height and width, three back fat thickness at the points of 4th, 14th rib and chine bone, eye muscle area and lean meat percent were collected at the ages of 70, 145 and 180 days and then slaughtered to measure carcass weight, back fat, belly, collar butt, spare rib, picnic shoulder, hind leg, loin, tenderloin, lean meat yield and intramuscular rough fat content in loin. Genetic analysis was done using a multi-trait animal model. Heritabilties of the body measurements were ranged from 0.331 to 0.559 and three measurements of back fat thickness were also high as range varying from 0.402 to 0.475 for the ages of 145 and 180 days. However, eye muscle area was moderate (0.296) at the age of 180 days. Heritabilities of retail cut yields were also high as ranged from 0.387 to 0.474 and of IMF content in loin was 0.499. Heritabilities of the cut percent traits were ranged from 0.249 to 0.488. Important positive genetic and phenotypic correlations were noted for all carcass yield traits (0.298 to 0.875 and 0.432 to 0.922, respectively). IMF showed low negative genetic correlations with carcass yield traits, such as carcass weight, picnic shoulder, hind leg, loin, tenderloin and lean meat yield whereas low positive genetic correlations with back fat, belly, collar butt and spare rib. Loin, tenderloin and lean meat percent showed negative genetic correlations with carcass weight, back fat thickness, collar butt, spare rib and picnic shoulder percent. The four body measurements at the ages of 70, 145 and 180 days had positive genetic correlations with belly, shoulder butt, spare rib, picnic shoulder and hind leg percent, but negative genetic correlations were shown with loin and tenderloin percent except body measurements at 70 days. The results suggest that carcass yield are negatively correlated with intramuscular fat content, which is a major factor deciding pork quality and the yield of loin and tenderloin are not increased as much as increase in body size. However, the proportions of belly and collar butt are increased with the body size. In conclusion, selection strategy should be designed according to the preference on composition of carcass in each country.

Maternal and Direct Genetic Parameters for Production Traits and Maternal Correlations among Production and Feed Efficiency Traits in Duroc Pigs

  • Hoque, M.A.;Kadowaki, H.;Shibata, T.;Suzuki, K.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.21 no.7
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    • pp.961-966
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    • 2008
  • Direct and maternal genetic parameters for production traits in 1,642 pigs and maternal genetic correlations among production (1,642 pigs) and feed efficiency (380 boars) traits were estimated in 7 generations of a Duroc population. Traits studied were daily gain (DG), intramuscular fat (IMF), loineye area (LEA), backfat thickness (BF), daily feed intake (FI), feed conversion ratio (FCR) and residual feed intake (RFI). The RFI was calculated as the difference between actual and predicted feed intake. The predicted feed intake was estimated by adjusting the initial test weight, DG and BF. Data for production traits were analyzed using four alternative animal models (including direct, direct+maternal permanent environmental, or direct+maternal genetic+maternal permanent environmental effects). Direct heritability estimates from the model including direct and all maternal effects were $0.41{\pm}0.04$ for DG, $0.27{\pm}0.04$ for IMF, $0.52{\pm}0.06$ for LEA and $0.64{\pm}0.04$ for BF. Estimated maternal heritabilities ranged from $0.04{\pm}0.04$ to $0.15{\pm}0.05$ for production traits. Antagonistic relationships were observed between direct and maternal genetic effects ($r_{am}$) for LEA (-0.21). Maternal genetic correlations of feed efficiency traits with FI ($r_g$ of FI with FCR and RFI were $0.73{\pm}0.06$ and $0.90{\pm}0.05$, respectively) and LEA (rg of LEA with FCR and RFI were $-0.48{\pm}0.05$ to $-0.61{\pm}0.05$, respectively) were favorable. The estimated moderate genetic correlations between direct and maternal genetic effects for IMF and LEA indicated that maternal effects has an important role in these traits, and should be accounted for in the genetic evaluation system.

Genetic analysis of milk production traits of Tunisian Holsteins using random regression test-day model with Legendre polynomials

  • Zaabza, Hafedh Ben;Gara, Abderrahmen Ben;Rekik, Boulbaba
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.31 no.5
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    • pp.636-642
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    • 2018
  • Objective: The objective of this study was to estimate genetic parameters of milk, fat, and protein yields within and across lactations in Tunisian Holsteins using a random regression test-day (TD) model. Methods: A random regression multiple trait multiple lactation TD model was used to estimate genetic parameters in the Tunisian dairy cattle population. Data were TD yields of milk, fat, and protein from the first three lactations. Random regressions were modeled with third-order Legendre polynomials for the additive genetic, and permanent environment effects. Heritabilities, and genetic correlations were estimated by Bayesian techniques using the Gibbs sampler. Results: All variance components tended to be high in the beginning and the end of lactations. Additive genetic variances for milk, fat, and protein yields were the lowest and were the least variable compared to permanent variances. Heritability values tended to increase with parity. Estimates of heritabilities for 305-d yield-traits were low to moderate, 0.14 to 0.2, 0.12 to 0.17, and 0.13 to 0.18 for milk, fat, and protein yields, respectively. Within-parity, genetic correlations among traits were up to 0.74. Genetic correlations among lactations for the yield traits were relatively high and ranged from $0.78{\pm}0.01$ to $0.82{\pm}0.03$, between the first and second parities, from $0.73{\pm}0.03$ to $0.8{\pm}0.04$ between the first and third parities, and from $0.82{\pm}0.02$ to $0.84{\pm}0.04$ between the second and third parities. Conclusion: These results are comparable to previously reported estimates on the same population, indicating that the adoption of a random regression TD model as the official genetic evaluation for production traits in Tunisia, as developed by most Interbull countries, is possible in the Tunisian Holsteins.

Genetic Parameter Estimation of Carcass Traits of Duroc Predicted Using Ultrasound Scanning Modes

  • Salces, Agapita J.;Seo, Kang Seok;Cho, Kyu Ho;Kim, SiDong;Lee, Young Chang
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.19 no.10
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    • pp.1379-1383
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    • 2006
  • A total of 6,804 records for Duroc breed were collected from three farms registered at the Korean Animal Improvement Association (KAIA) from 1998 to 2004 of which both records from two ultrasound modes (A and B) were analyzed to estimate the variance components of carcass traits. Three carcass traits backfat thickness (bf), loin eye muscle area (lma) and lean meat percentage (lmp) were measured. These traits were analyzed separately as bf1, lma1 and lmp1 for ultrasound mode A and bf2, lma2 and lmp2 for ultrasound mode B with multiple trait animal model by using MTDFREML (Boldman et al., 1993). All the traits revealed medium heritability values. Estimated heritabilities for bf1, bf2, lma1, lma2, lmp1 and lmp2 were 0.45, 0.39, 0.32, 0.25, 0.28 and 0.39, respectively. Estimated genetic correlations for traits bf1 and bf2, lma1 and lma2, lmp1 and lmp2 were positive but low. Specifically, genetic correlations between bf1 and bf2 was 0.30 while the estimates for lean traits between lma1 and lma2 and between lmp1 and lmp2 were 0.15 and 0.18, respectively. Conversely, high negative genetic correlations existed between bf1 and the lean traits lma2, lmp2. Likewise, the estimated genetic correlations between lma1 and lma2 and lmp1 and lmp2 were low.