• Title, Summary, Keyword: Hospital Violence

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Relationship between Violence Response, Professional Quality of Life and Workplace Violence against Nurses in Emergency Departments in Korea (국내 응급실 간호사의 폭력경험 실태와 폭력반응, 전문직 삶의 질과의 관계)

  • Ju, Euna;Youn, Junghee;Lee, Juyoung;Jang, Jaehyuk;Park, Hyeree
    • Journal of Korean Clinical Nursing Research
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    • v.24 no.2
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    • pp.159-169
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    • 2018
  • Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the reality of workplace violence experienced by emergency nurses and the relationship of violence response to professional quality of life. Methods: The participants in this study were 899 emergency nurses from Korea nationwide. Data were obtained through an online survey done during October, 2017. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-test, ANOVA, Pearson correlation coefficient. Results: Of the emergency nurses, 72.1% recognized that workplace violence is serious. Experience with workplace violence correlated positively with violence reaction (r=.32, p<.001), burnout (r-.20, p<.001) and secondary trauma (r=.22, p<.001). Also, reaction to violence was positively correlated with burnout (r=.28, p<.001) and secondary trauma (r=.56, p<.001). Conclusion: Findings indicate that the diverse workplace violence experienced by emergency nurses decreases their professional quality of life. Further study is needed to develop solutions to the problem of workplace violence in emergency settings.

Types of Violence and Coping Methods Experienced by General Hospital Nurses (종합병원 간호사가 경험한 폭력 유형과 대처방식)

  • Kang, Mi Jung;Park, Ihn Sook
    • Journal of Korean Clinical Nursing Research
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    • v.21 no.1
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    • pp.92-104
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    • 2015
  • Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify the types of violence and coping methods experienced by general hospital nurses. Methods: Data were collected from March 17 to 24, 2014, using self-report questionnaires. Responses from 449 nurses were analyzed. Results: The majority of the respondents experienced violence from patients, visitors, doctors, and other nurses. Verbal violence was more frequent than physical threats and physical violence. Most violence happened in ERs, followed by surgical units, and ICUs. The most frequent response by nurses after violence was an emotional response, especially 'anger' ($4.01{\pm}1.059$). Based on general characteristics, the responses were significant for professional experience (F=2.935, p=.013) and work areas (F=2.290, p=.021). The most frequent coping method for nurses after violence had occurred was to 'just complete their duties as if nothing happened'. Conclusion: Most nurses are exposed to frequent violence, but they feel defenseless. These results suggest that hospital should improve the respective organizational cultures and develop promotional programs and administrative policies to prevent violence. In addition, educational programs should be provided for nurses to improve their attitudes and abilities to cope with violence. Also, hospitals should offer sufficient support, stress reduction programs and counseling programs for nurses.

Coping Styles toward Hospital Violence in Clinical Nurses: An Application of Q Methodology (임상간호사의 병원 폭력 대처 유형: Q-방법론적 접근)

  • Ha, Eunho;Cho, Jinyoung
    • Korean Journal of Adult Nursing
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    • v.25 no.3
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    • pp.263-274
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    • 2013
  • Purpose: Clinical nurses are at high risk of incurring hospital violence during their working life. Hospital violence and its outcomes have an impact on the job satisfaction, the recruitment and retention of nurses as well as the quality of care delivered to patients. The purpose of this study was to identify coping styles toward hospital violence in clinical nurses using Q-methodology. Methods: Q-methodology, which analyzes the subjectivity of each type of attitude, and coping styles was used. The 40 selected Q-statements from each of 35 participants were classified into the shape of a normal distribution using a 9-point scale. The collected data were analyzed using the pc-QUANAL program. Results: The results revealed four discrete groups of clinical nurses toward hospital violence: take strong action and promote the recurrence prevention, appear psychosomatic symptoms, investigate the cause and focus on prevention, and request hospital assistance and keep up my duty. Conclusion: The findings indicate that development of nursing intervention program based on the four types could beneficially contribute to the violence prevention in hospital.

A Survey on Nurses' Experience of Verbal and Physical Violence in Small and Medium-sized Hospitals (일개 중소병원 간호사가 경험한 언어적, 신체적 폭력 사건 실태)

  • Kang, Ae Jeong;Lee, Mi Suk;Jeon, Mi Yang
    • Journal of muscle and joint health
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    • v.25 no.2
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    • pp.84-91
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    • 2018
  • Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify the types of violence experienced by small and medium sized hospital nurses. Methods: Data were collected from March 1 to 30, 2017, using self-report questionnaires. Responses from 87 nurses were analyzed using descriptive statistics, $x^2$ test, Fisher's exact test, t-test. Results: The majority of the respondents experienced violence from patients (60.2%), visitors (25.5%), doctors (12.2%), and other staffs (2.0%). Verbal violence (80.5%) and physical threats (74.7%) were more frequent than physical violence (25.3%). Violence occurred throughout the hospital. However, verbal violence ($x^2=20.85$, p=.005) and physical threat ($x^2=20.80$, p=.006) were statistically significant according to the department. Violence occurred most frequently in surgical ward, followed by artificial kidney room, emergency room, and outpatient department. Conclusion: Most nurses are exposed to frequent violence. These results suggest that hospital should improve the respective organizational cultures and develop promotional programs and administrative policies to prevent violence. Also, hospitals should develop of violence intervention policies and education programs and counseling programs for nurses.

The Determinants of the Long-term Influence of Violence: Focus on Hospital Nurses (폭력의 장기적 영향 결정요인: 병원간호사를 중심으로)

  • Lee, Sun-Ok;Kim, Moon-Jeong
    • The Korean Journal of Health Service Management
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    • v.10 no.1
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    • pp.93-104
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    • 2016
  • Objectives : The purpose of this study was to identify the determinants of the long-term influence of violence on hospital nurses. Methods : Three-hundred hospital nurses were recruited in B city, South Korea. They were asked to complete a questionnaire, and 282 data- sets were included in the multiple regression analysis. Results : Subjects experienced more episodes of verbal violence than that of physical threats or physical violence. Assailants tended to be patients and their caretakers rather than internal customers. Nurses who had religion, worked in a surgical ward, and a 3-6 year career perceived a high level of violent experiences compared to their counterparts. The determinants of the long-term influence of violence were physical violence (t=-2.705, p=.007), emotion-focused coping (t=3.049, p=.003), and emotional response (t=3.611, p<.001). The model was statistically significant explaining 13.0% of the variance (F=14.981, p<.001). Conclusions : Nurse managers should help nurses who are victims of hospital violence by teaching them not to depend on emotion-focused coping and by alleviating their emotional response to violence.

Relationship of Experience of Violence and Professional Quality of Life for Hospital Nurses' (병원 간호사의 폭력경험과 전문직 삶의 질과의 관계)

  • Bae, Yeonhee;Lee, Taewha
    • Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing Administration
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    • v.21 no.5
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    • pp.489-500
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    • 2015
  • Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify the relation between violence experiences and the professional quality of life for hospital nurses. Methods: The participants for this study were 212 nurses in one general and three special hospitals located in the metropolitan area of Seoul, South Korea. Data gathered through October and November 2013 were analyzed using descriptive statistics and $x^2$ test. Results: Nurses experienced verbal violence, physical threats and physical violence more frequently from patients and their families rather than from doctors or peer nurses. Nurse's compassion satisfaction was low when nurses experienced violence from peer nurses. Burnout was high when nurses experienced violence from doctors, peer nurses, patients and their families. Secondary traumatic stress was affected by violence from patients and their families. The professional quality of life of nurses was associated with violence from doctors, peer nurses, patients and their families. Of the nurses, 69.3% answered that formation of a positive organizational culture would be the most effective measure for prevention of violence in hospitals. Conclusion: The formation of positive organizational culture, development of violence intervention policies and education are crucial to improve the professional quality of hospital nurses' life.

Convergent approach of phenomenological methodology about Emergency Nurses' experience of hospital violence (응급실 간호사들의 폭력 경험에 대한 현상학적 방법론의 융합적 접근)

  • Jeong, Young-Hee
    • Journal of the Korea Convergence Society
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    • v.6 no.5
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    • pp.63-75
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    • 2015
  • The aim of this study was to know the experience of emergency nurses on hospital violence and violence's effect on nurses via convergent approach of phenomenological methodology to be known for a good method to study alive human's experience. This study is a qualitative study converged the phenomenological methods and 5 emergency nurses participated in an in-depth interview. From the transcript, 41 significant statements, 17 clusters of theme, 6 categories were extracted. The extracted categories are violence's background, emotional response, physical response, social response, passive coping and active coping. The hospital violence's negative effect on emergency nurses occurred in various sides and the countermeasure is required to prevent violence from hospital setting anymore.

Relationship between School Violence and Depressive Symptoms among Multicultural Families' Offspring in South Korea

  • Lee, Cheol-Soon;Lee, Dongyun;Seo, Ji-Young;Ahn, In-Young;Bhang, Soo-Young
    • Psychiatry investigation
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    • v.14 no.2
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    • pp.216-218
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    • 2017
  • The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of school violence on depressive symptoms among the offspring of multicultural families in South Korea. Data from the National Survey of Multicultural Families 2012, conducted by the Korean Women's Development Institute and Statistics Korea, were used in this study. Complex samples logistic regression was performed to determine the effect of school violence on depressive mood. The survey participants were 3999 students between the ages of 9 and 24. Of the participants, 22.1% reported experiencing depressive symptoms and 9.1% reported experiencing school violence within the last year. School violence was a strong risk factor (OR=5.142, 95% CI=4.067-6.500) for depressive symptoms after adjusting for personal, familial and school factors. School violence is a serious contributor to depressive mood among the offspring of multicultural families. There is a significant need to monitor school violence among this vulnerable group.

The Influence of Violence Experience on the Job Stress among Hospital Employees Working at Administration and Discharging Department (병원 원무행정근무자의 폭력경험이 직무스트레스에 미치는 영향)

  • Choi, Yun-young;Han, Mi Ah;Park, Jong;Choi, Seong Woo
    • Health Policy and Management
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    • v.26 no.4
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    • pp.325-332
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    • 2016
  • Background: Workplace violence was recognized to be social problems that might impact the health status and the job satisfaction of employee in hospitals. This study investigated the current status of violence and job stress among hospital employees working at administration and discharging department. Methods: The study subjects were 213 administrative employees working at 20 general hospitals. Data were collected by self-administered questionnaire that included information such as demographics, job-related characteristics, experience of violence, and job stress. The violence was classified as verbal violence, physical threat, and physical violence occurred by patients and caregivers. Analysis of variance, t-tests, correlation analysis, and multiple linear regression analysis were performed to examine the associated factors with job stress. Results: The levels of verbal violence, physical threat, and physical violence were $1.64{\pm}1.08$, $0.54{\pm}0.67$, and $0.04{\pm}0.17$, respectively. The score of job stress was $2.74{\pm}0.50$ and it was associated with age, existence of spouse, drinking frequency, subjective health status, disease history, night-time treatment, and public health administration career in simple analysis. In multiple linear regression analysis, the level of verbal violence experience was significantly associated with job stress (B=0.09, p=0.001). Also physical threats (B=0.18, p<0.001) and physical violence (B=0.48, p=0.008) showed positive association with job stress. Conclusion: This study attempted to examine the association between experience of violence and job stress in administrative employees at medical institutions. Levels of violence showed positive correlation with the job stress. Environment improvement to protect employee from violence and management of employees who experienced workplace violence are needed to reduce the job stress.

Violence Experiences of Clinical Nurses and Nurse Aids in Hospitals (병원종사 간호 인력의 직장폭력 경험 실태)

  • Kim, Souk Young;Ahn, Hye Young;Kim, Hyeon Suk
    • Korean Journal of Occupational Health Nursing
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    • v.17 no.1
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    • pp.76-85
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    • 2008
  • Purpose: The purpose of this study were to explore workplace violence experiences and to analyze differences of violence experiences based on the department and harmers to nurses in hospitals. Method: Data were collected from the self-reported survey of 496 nurses and nurse aids in three hospitals in D area in Korea from April to May in 2007. The data were analyzed by descriptive statistics and logistic regression analysis using SPSS Win 12.0. Result: The nurses in hospitals experienced offensive verbal abuse (88.4%), verbal threat (36.5%), physical violence (24.5%), serious physical violence (2.2%), and sexual harrassment (25.7%) during last one year in hospitals. Nursing staffs in hospital demonstrated different violent experiences by age and service areas. Conclusion: These findings revealed high rates of violence experiences of nursing staffs in hospital. Thus, hospitals should develop policies, guidelines, and programs for preventing and managing workplace violence.

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