• Title, Summary, Keyword: Indigenous Goat Population

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Diversity of Chinese Indigenous Goat Breeds: A Conservation Perspective - A Review -

  • Li, M.H.;Li, K.;Zhao, S.H.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.17 no.5
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    • pp.726-732
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    • 2004
  • In this manuscript, a review of the diversity of Chinese indigenous goat breeds according to data from body stature and appearance, chromosome group, blood proteins, DNA molecular markers (mitochondria DNA, random amplified polymorphic DNA, microsatellite DNA, major histocompatibility complex) has been introduced. All of these provide efficient tools for the diversity analysis of Chinese indigenous goat breeds and are very important for biodiversity conservation, restoration of declining goat breeds, the priority defining in Chinese indigenous goat breeds' protection and the selection of nature preservation zones. Many Chinese indigenous goat breeds with small population size in the isolated mountains or reservoir areas are verging the potential threat of extinction, effectively lost with the rapid destroying of ecological environment. On the other hand, as a result of the introduction of modern commercial goat breeds and shortage of effective conservation, some populations, such as Small-xiang goat and Tibetan goat decrease rapidly in number of sires. In the interests of the long-term future of the goat breeds in China, conservation of goat breeds' genetic resources should be considered urgently and some conservation measures should be adopted. In addition, the continuing development of molecular biology will further enhance conservation of diversity of Chinese indigenous goat breeds.

Insights into the genetic diversity of indigenous goats and their conservation priorities

  • Liu, Gang;Zhao, Qianjun;Lu, Jian;Sun, Feizhou;Han, Xu;Zhao, Junjin;Feng, Haiyong;Wang, Kejun;Liu, Chousheng
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.32 no.10
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    • pp.1501-1510
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    • 2019
  • Objective: An experiment was conducted to evaluate genetic diversity of 26 Chinese indigenous goats by 30 microsatellite markers, and then to define conservation priorities to set up the protection programs according to the weight given to within- and between-breed genetic diversity. Methods: Twenty-six representative populations of Chinese indigenous goats, 1,351 total, were sampled from different geographic regions of China. Within-breed genetic diversity and marker polymorphism were estimated calculating the mean number of alleles, observed heterozygosities, expected heterozygosities, fixation index, effective number of alleles and allelic richness. Conservation priorities were analyzed by statistical methods. Results: A relatively high level of genetic diversity was found in twenty-four population; the exceptions were in the Daiyun and Fuqing goat populations. Within-breed kinship coefficient matrices identified seven highly inbred breeds which should be of concern. Of these, six breeds receive a negative contribution to heterozygosity when the method was based on proportional contribution to heterozygosity. Based on Weitzman or Piyasatian and Kinghorn methods, the breeds distant from others i.e. Inner Mongolia Cashmere goat, Chengdu Brown goat and Leizhou goat obtain a high ranking. Evidence from Caballero and Toro and Fabuel et al method prioritized Jining Gray goat, Liaoning Cashmere goat, and Inner Mongolia Cashmere goat, which agree with results from Kinship-based methods. Conclusion: Conservation priorities were determined according to multiple methods. Our results suggest Inner Mongolia Cashmere goat (most methods), Jining Gray goat and Liaoning Cashmere goat (high contribution to heterozygosity and total diversity) should be prioritized based on most methods. Furthermore, Daiyun goat and Shannan White goat also should be prioritized based on consideration of effective population size. However, if one breed can continually survive under changing conditions, the straightforward approach would be to increase its utilization and attraction for production via mining breed germplasm characteristics.

Diversity in Six Goat Populations in the Middle and Lower Yangtze River Valley

  • Jiang, X.P.;Liu, G.Q.;Ding, J.T.;Yang, L.G.;Cao, S.X.;Cheng, S.O.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.16 no.2
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    • pp.277-281
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    • 2003
  • Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLPs) markers were used to investigate the genetic variation in six autochthonous goat populations distributed in the middle and lower Yangtze River valley. The goat populations were Chengdu Grey Goat (CGG), Chuandong White Goat (CWG), Banjiao Goat (BG), Matou Goat (MG), Hui Goat (HG) and Yangtze River Delta White Goat (YRDWG). A total of 180 individuals (30 per population) were analysed using ten selected AFLP primer combinations that produced 78 clear polymorphism loci. The variability at AFLP loci was largely maintained within populations, as indicated by the average genetic similarity, and they were ranged from 0.745 to 0.758 within populations and 0.951 to 0.970 between populations. No breed specific markers were identified. Cluster analysis based on Nei' genetic distance between populations indicated that Chengdu Grey Goat is the most distant population, while CWG and YROWG were the closest populations, followed by BG, HG and MG. Genetic diversity of the goat populations didn' confirm what was expected on the basis of their geographical location, which may reflect undocumented migrations and gene flows and identify an original genetic resource.

Detecting Positive Selection of Korean Native Goat Populations Using Next-Generation Sequencing

  • Lee, Wonseok;Ahn, Sojin;Taye, Mengistie;Sung, Samsun;Lee, Hyun-Jeong;Cho, Seoae;Kim, Heebal
    • Molecules and Cells
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    • v.39 no.12
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    • pp.862-868
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    • 2016
  • Goats (Capra hircus) are one of the oldest species of domesticated animals. Native Korean goats are a particularly interesting group, as they are indigenous to the area and were raised in the Korean peninsula almost 2,000 years ago. Although they have a small body size and produce low volumes of milk and meat, they are quite resistant to lumbar paralysis. Our study aimed to reveal the distinct genetic features and patterns of selection in native Korean goats by comparing the genomes of native Korean goat and crossbred goat populations. We sequenced the whole genome of 15 native Korean goats and 11 crossbred goats using next-generation sequencing (Illumina platform) to compare the genomes of the two populations. We found decreased nucleotide diversity in the native Korean goats compared to the crossbred goats. Genetic structural analysis demonstrated that the native Korean goat and cross-bred goat populations shared a common ancestry, but were clearly distinct. Finally, to reveal the native Korean goat's selective sweep region, selective sweep signals were identified in the native Korean goat genome using cross-population extended haplotype homozygosity (XP-EHH) and a cross-population composite likelihood ratio test (XP-CLR). As a result, we were able to identify candidate genes for recent selection, such as the CCR3 gene, which is related to lumbar paralysis resistance. Combined with future studies and recent goat genome information, this study will contribute to a thorough understanding of the native Korean goat genome.