• Title, Summary, Keyword: Korean Traditional Monster

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Case Study of Digital Restoration of Korean Traditional Monsters (한국 전통 몬스터 디지털 복원 사례 연구)

  • Han Kwang-Sik
    • The Journal of the Korea Contents Association
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    • v.4 no.4
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    • pp.21-32
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    • 2004
  • This study is aimed that reappearance and restoration of Korean tradition monster's original shape be able to contribute in scenario material development which is filled with history, culture and long imagination of our country. As for method of this study, it is on the basis of literature investigation in history, tale, folk-tale etc. and expert's research, and also restored 50 items of Korean tradition monster in digital way. Study finding is as following. First, prescribed scope of Korean tradition monster including god, ghost, bogy and animal. Second, Korean tradition monster's pattern is classified with S degrees and 4 classes to according to grade of rank and appearance place. Third, each of 50 traditional monsters which are usable to scenario substance development was produced with graphic image and flash animation. Fourth, suggested idea for material development of cultural contents industry as like game and character based on each monster's story. Expect the developed result production from this study to be used as a resource of elevating in comprehension forward to our cultural tradition, to be used as a unique material in field of culture contents industry of game, character, cartoon and movie etc.

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'Nobody helps the family.' South Korean Cultural Identity in Bong Joon-ho's The Host (2006)

  • McSweeney, Terence
    • Cross-Cultural Studies
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    • v.20
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    • pp.275-294
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    • 2010
  • This article examines Bong Joon-ho's science fiction/horror film, The Host (2006) and interrogates its depiction of a contemporary South Korean family in crisis. The writer considers the film as a resonant cultural artefact and a manifestation of particularly new-millennial anxieties concerned with the continued involvement of the United States in South Korean affairs, fears of an erosion of traditional family values and mistrust of officious, state endorsed bureaucracy. The Host emerges as a profoundly visceral depiction of an ordinary family set against everyone with no one to turn to except each other.

A study of a Japanese goblin character:Centered around the making method of goblins' image (요괴 캐릭터 연구:요괴 이미지의 생성원리를 중심으로)

  • Kim, Yoon-A
    • Cartoon and Animation Studies
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    • pp.141-163
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    • 2009
  • This paper examined the goblin characters in Japan animation. The meaning of the goblin in this paper is not a just monster. They have a spirit. This concept is based on animism in japanese mind. I attempted a chase of goblin character's making methods. My theoretical approaches lean on the concepts "inter-textuality" of Julia Kristeva and "text" of Roland Barthes. First of all, I compared some beings of the old chinese myth-geographical book with some characters of Japan animation . The making method of goblin characters is two. One is 'Hybrid', the other is 'Mutant'. And than I appled to Japanese traditional image, "Baek-kuy-ya-hang-do"(hundreds of goblins' parade). The making method of goblins is combined to a inter-textual way as hybrid or mutant.

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VENGEANCE, VIOLENCE, VAMPIRES: Dark Humour in the Films of Park Chan-wook

  • Hughes, Jessica
    • Cross-Cultural Studies
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    • v.28
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    • pp.17-36
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    • 2012
  • This essay places the South Korean film Thirst (2009) within Park Chan-wook's oeuvre as a filmmaker notorious for graphic depictions of violence and revenge. Park's use of dark humour in his films, which is emphasized in Thirst perhaps more than ever, allows for a more self-aware depiction of violence, where both the viewer and the protagonist are awakened to the futility of revenge. This ultimately paints his characters as fascinatingly crazy - simultaneously heroes, villains, and victims. Film theorist Wes D. Gehring's three themes of dark humour ('man as beast,' 'the absurdity of the world,' and 'the omnipresence of death') become most obvious in Park's most recent film, which pays closer attention to character development through narrative detail. Rather than portraying the characters as sentimental, dark humour depicts their misfortunes in an alternative way, allowing for consideration of such taboo subjects as religion, adultery, and death/suicide. These issues are further tackled through Thirst's portrayal of its vampire protagonist, which ultimately de-mystifies the traditional vampire figure. While this character has more often been associated with romance, exoticism and the mystical powers of the supernatural, Thirst takes relatively little from the demons of Nosferatu (Murnau, 1922) and various other Dracula adaptations, nor the romantic figures of Interview with the Vampire (Jordan, 1994), and Twilight (Hardwicke, 2008). Instead, it is part of a much smaller group of contemporary vampire films, which are rather informed by a postmodern reconfiguration of the monster. Thus, this paper examines Thirst as an important contribution to the global and hybrid nature of those films in which postmodern vampires are sympathetic and de-mystified, exhibiting symptoms stemming from a natural illness or misfortune. Park's undertaking of a vampire film allows for a complex balance between narrative and visuals through his focus on the Western implications of this myth within Korean cinema. This combination of international references and traditional Korean culture marks it as highly conscious of New Korean Cinema's focus on globalization. With Thirst, Park successfully unites familiar images of the vampire hunting and feeding, with more stylistically distinct, grotesque images of violence and revenge. In this sense, dark humour highlights the less charming aspects of the vampire struggling to survive, most effective in scenes depicting the protagonist feeding from his friend's IV in the hospital, and sitting in the sunlight, slowly turning to ash, in the final minutes of the film. The international appeal of Park's style, combining conventions of the horror/thriller genre with his own mixture of dark humour and non-linear narrative, is epitomized in Thirst, which underscores South Korea's growing global interest with its overt international framework. Furthermore, he portrayal of the vampire as a sympathetic figure allows for a shift away from the conventional focus on myth and the exotic, toward a renewed construction of the vampire in terms of its contribution to generic hybridization and cultural adaptation.