• Title, Summary, Keyword: Koreans

Search Result 2,585, Processing Time 0.045 seconds

Identifying Perceptional Dimensions and Patterns of Korean Traditional Food Culture in Central Asia - Comparisons Among Koreans Living in Yanbian, Mongolia, and Uzbekistan - (중앙아시아 지역 한인의 한국전통음식에 대한 인식 유형의 국제 비교 - 연변, 몽골, 우즈베키스탄 지역을 중심으로 -)

  • Park, Young-Sun;Chung, Young-Sook
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Food Culture
    • /
    • v.24 no.5
    • /
    • pp.457-466
    • /
    • 2009
  • The purpose of this study was to identify and compare the dimensions and patterns of the perception of traditional food for Koreans living in Yanbian, Mongolia and Uzbekistan. Items representing the perception of traditional food were combined into a dimension and a pattern based on underlying perception of the Koreans living in the area. Any difference in the perception of the Koreans living in these areas likely reflects their different dimensions and patterns. Thus, it is important to determine if Koreans living in Yanbian, Mongolia and Uzbekistan should be treated as a homogeneous group when defining their perceptional structure of traditional food. Factor and cluster analysis of the data generated in this study revealed two different dimensions and patterns for each group of Koreans living in Yanbian, Mongolia and Uzbekistan. However, the structure of the dimensions and patterns of the perception of traditional food differed, indicating that Koreans within and between the countries are not a homogeneous group. Similarities and differences in perceptional dimensions and patterns among Yanbian, Mongolian and Uzbekistan-Koreans are also discussed. Moreover, future implications for food and nutrition specialists, especially for those who have an interest in Korean traditional food in Asia and those who have an interest in globalization of Korean traditional food are provided.

Preferences and Product Development Opinions of Koreans and Non-Koreans Regarding Commercialization of Korean Foods (한식 상품화를 위한 내.외국인의 한식에 대한 선호도 및 상품 개발 견해)

  • Chang, Hye-Ja;Choi, Bo-Ram;Yi, Na-Young;Park, Bo-Seock;Kim, Hee-Sun
    • Korean journal of food and cookery science
    • /
    • v.26 no.4
    • /
    • pp.458-468
    • /
    • 2010
  • The purpose of this study was to assess Korean and non-Korean customers' preferences with regards to Korean foods as well as their opinions concerning the commercialization of Korean foods. The subjects consisted of 268 Koreans and 217 non-Koreans in Seoul, Gyeonggi and Daejeon, Korea and in Texas in the United States. The respondents were asked to assess their preferences regarding 22 Korean food items using a 5-point scale (1: strongly dislike - 5: strongly like). Excluding responses with significant missing data, there were 485 usable responses. Data were analyzed using SPSS Windows (ver. 14.0) for descriptive analysis and t-test. Korean customers' perception and preferences regarding Korean foods were significantly higher than those of non-Korean customers (p<0.001). Among the 22 Korean food items, Galbi-gui (4.32) was chosen to be Koreans' favorite menu, whereas Bulgogi (4.25) was most preferred by non-Koreans. Patjuk was the least preferred by Koreans (3.37) and non-Koreans (3.18) alike. Regarding convenience food product equivalents of the 22 Korean foods, Koreans thought Bibimbap to be the bestseller while non-Koreans thought that Bulgogi was the most sold product. Korean and non-Korean mostly wanted to purchase Bibimbap and Bulgogi respectively, if Korean foods are commercialized as a convenience food. Koreans (44.4%) and non-Koreans (66.8%) reported "taste" as the most important factor when choosing a convenience food. Koreans chose "salty taste" (26.9%) and "simple cooking method" (23.1%), whereas non-Koreans chose "nutrition" (23.5%) and "hot taste" (21.2%) as aspects that require improvement in order to commercialize Korean foods.

Comparative Assessments of Dietary Intake of Korean-Chinese and Koreans (중국 연변 조선족 성인과 한국 구리지역 성인의 영양소 및 식품섭취 비교 평가)

  • Park, Eun-Mi;Paik, Hee-Young;Kim, Joung-Soon;Wen, Yong
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Food Culture
    • /
    • v.15 no.5
    • /
    • pp.368-378
    • /
    • 2000
  • This study was conducted to assess dietary intake and quality obtained by 24-hour recall method between Korean-Chinese in Yanbian, China(Korean-Chinese) and Koreans in Kuri, Korea(Koreans). The subjects consisted of 730 Korean-Chinese and 696 Koreans. Mean daily energy intake of Korean-Chinese was 1,788kcal and that of Korean was 1,844kcal. Proportions of energy intake from carbohydrate, fat, and protein were 62.6: 16.9: 14.2 for Korean-Chinese and 65.4: 16.3: 14.4 for Koreans. Nutrient intake levels of Koreans were higher than those of Korean-chinese in most nutrients. Calcium and vitamin $B_2$ intakes as percent of Korean RDA were less than 60% in Korean-Chinese. Koreans consumed calcium and vitamin A in the level less than 80% of Korean RDA. Iron intake level of Korean females was less than 75% of Korean RDA. Korean-Chinese consumed 90.4% of food from plant origin, and Koreans consumed 82.5% of food from plant origin. Mean dietary diversity score(DDS) of Korean-Chinese, $3.00{\pm}0.39$, was significantly lower than that of Koreans, $3.73{\pm}0.76(p<0.05)$. Mean dietary variety score(DVS) of Korean-Chinese, 13.6, was significantly lower than that of Koreans, 20.1(p<0.001). According to these results, some adults in the both Korean-Chinese and Koreans did not consume enough nutrients, especially calcium and vitamin $B_2$ intake for Korean-Chinese and calcium and vitamin A intake for Koreans. Dietary qualities of Korean-Chinese subjects and Korean females were not adequate. In the future, further research to promote dietary quality of Koreans including Korean-Chinese must consider the results of this study.

  • PDF

A study on the foreign accent of Koreans

  • Park, Hee-Suk
    • Speech Sciences
    • /
    • v.7 no.1
    • /
    • pp.187-201
    • /
    • 2000
  • This study was done to investigate the English vowels in relation to the foreign accent. In this study, I also tried to find out the foreign accent of the English diphthong /o/ and front low vowel /${\ae}$/ when Koreans speak English. The reason why I chose these vowels is that these vowels, /o/ and /${\ae}$/, are difficult for Koreans to discern and pronounce. Koreans show a foreign accent in their pronunciation. In order to find out the reason for a Korean foreign accent, experiments were carried out with the help of acoustic instruments. According to the results of the experiment, Koreans showed a foreign accent in their English pronunciation of vowels in relation to their utterance positions. Americans showed a final lengthening effect but Koreans showed a final shortening effect. This means that Koreans showed a foreign accent in the final stressed syllable of a sentence. In addition to this, the duration of two English vowels, /o/ and /${\ae}$/, showed considerably different features between Koreans and Americans. In fact, in the pronunciation of the diphthong /o/, the tongue moves from one position to another. The two articulations of a diphthong can be described as the nucleus plus a glide. However, most Koreans have no idea of this phenomenon and pronounce the diphthongs like two separate monophthongs. This causes a great difference in the lengths of English diphthong /o/ between Koreans and Americans.

  • PDF

Study on Preferences and Perception of Koreans and Non-Koreans Residing in Korea Regarding Globalization of Korean Foods (한식 세계화를 위한 내국인과 국내 체류 외국인의 한국음식 선호도와 한식에 대한 인식)

  • Park, Hae-Youn;Ahn, Myung-Wha;Kim, Bok-Wha;Kim, Na-Young
    • Journal of the East Asian Society of Dietary Life
    • /
    • v.24 no.2
    • /
    • pp.155-165
    • /
    • 2014
  • The purpose of this study was to assess comsumer preferences and perception of Korean foods in Koreans and non-Koreans residing in Korea. Exactly 79 customers (28 Koreans, 51 non-Koreans) were surveyed with questionnaires in English and Korean. Data were analyzed using the SPSS statistical package (21.0) and ${\chi}^2$-test. Subjects were of various nationalities, including China (37.3%), Philippines (19.6%), Japan (17.7%), USA (11.8%), Uzbekistan (3.9%), Nepal (2.0%) and Nigeria (2.0%). The representative food was Kimchi and favorite Korean foods were Kimchi, Bulgogi, Bibimbap, Galbijjim etc. Koreans reported that the main advantages of Korean food were its 'home-made style', but non-Koreans reported 'health functionality'. In terms of disadvantages, non-Koreans consumers ranked 'unsanitary eating style without individual plates' as the biggest problem while Koreans ranked 'table setting at a time'. Factors 'complicated cooking method', 'spicy taste' and 'salty taste' were also reported disadvantages. Survey participants were asked what was the most important for the globalization of Korean food. Most non-Korean participants listed 'health functionality' and 'traditionalism' (p<0.05).

A Comparative Study on Differences in Preference of Various Teas Between the Koreans and the Japanese (각종(各種) 차류(茶類)의 기호(嗜好)에 관(關)한 한(韓).일(日) 비교(比較) 연구(硏究))

  • Hwang, Choon-Sun;Park, Soo-Ock;Setsue, Kawasome
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Food Culture
    • /
    • v.3 no.1
    • /
    • pp.67-76
    • /
    • 1988
  • With a view to making comparative study and promoting the interchange of food culture between Korea and Japan, a sensory test was given to 60 female college students (30 Koreans and as many Japanese) in order to find out differences in preference of various teas between the two nations. The findings are as follows: 1. The correlation between each specific tea and total evaluation: Significant level of high positive correlation was indicated in case of color, taste, and aftertaste by both Koreans and Japanese. In case of odor, and flavor the Koreans indicated insignificant level of nought, and the Japanese significant level of high negative correlation one. In sweetness and total evaluation the Koreans indicated positive correlation and the Japanese insignificant level of nought. 2. Comparison of preference of various teas by the Koreans and the Japanese 1) Ginseng tea A and Ginseng tea B As to Ginseng tea A and Ginseng tea B the Koreans liked odor best while the Japanese liked flavor best. In general preference the Koreans liked them better than the Japanese, and both groups indicated significant level (p <.001). 2) Black tea A: As to Black tea A the Koreans liked odor best while the Japanese taste, and in general preference the Japanese liked them better than the Koreans and both groups indicated significant level (p <.001). 3) Black tea B. As to Black tea B the Koreans liked odor best while the Japanese color, and in general preference the Japanese liked them better than the Korean and both groups indicated significant level (p <.01). 4) Coffee A. The Koreans liked odor best while the Japanese flavor, and neither of the groups indicated significant level (p <.05). 5) Coffee B. The Koreans liked color best while the Japanese flavor, and neither of the groups indicated significant level (p <.05). 6) Green tea A and Green tea B. As to Green tea A and Green tea B, the Koreans liked odor best while the Japanese taste. In general preference the Japanese liked them better than the Koreans, both indicated significant level (p <.001). 7) Malcha (a kind of traditional Green tea) Both groups liked flavor best, in general preference the Japanese liked it better than the Koreans, and both groups indicated significant level (p <.001).

  • PDF

Arirang; elegant sound and deep sorrow, which are unique to Korean is revived on YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/.watch?v=snmNp778JcY)

  • Ko, Kyung-Ja
    • CELLMED
    • /
    • v.6 no.2
    • /
    • pp.8.1-8.2
    • /
    • 2016
  • The purpose of this article is to argue that Arirang, Korean traditional music, could be used for healing purposes for Koreans. Music may be a medicine for curing both the body and mind. That is the soul of folksong. Arirang is a representative folksong in Korea. Koreans thought that listening to Korean traditional songs and singing them have healing powers because it makes people happier. When Koreans listen to Arirang, slowly as if they are mass hypnotized, Koreans calmed down because they think of mother's bosom while listening to Arirang. Also, Koreans find comfort in listening and singing to Arirang. The song's tune is catchy and its lyrics are moving. The song of Arirang was sung from long ago by Koreans. Therefore, it will continue forever as long as Koreans exist.

A Comparative Study on Health Lifestyle Behaviors among Chinese, Korean Chinese and Koreans (중국 연변지역의 한족, 조선족과 한국인의 건강행태 비교 연구)

  • Lee Sun-Dong;Choi Chan-Ho;Chang Kyung-Ho;Shin Heon-Tae
    • Journal of Society of Preventive Korean Medicine
    • /
    • v.7 no.1
    • /
    • pp.67-77
    • /
    • 2003
  • This study is to compare health related behaviors among Chinese, Korean Chinese in a Yanbian Province with a population of mainly Korean descendents and Koreans in Kangwon Province, Korea. Cross-sectional surveys were used to identify self-rated health, smoking, alcohol use, exercise and other lifestyle variables. A total of 739 Chinese, 663 Korean Chines, and 639 Koreans were surveyed using self-administered questionnaires. Few Korean Chinese(13.9%) reported they were healthy compared with Chinese(38.7%) and Koreans(36.3%). There was no difference in the prevalence of smoking by ethnic groups. More Koreans(48.5%) and Chinese Koreans(44.5%) reported drinking alcohol compared with Chinese(37.2%)(p < .001). Compared Chinese and Korean Chinese, fewer Koreans reported regular diet, exercise, health screening, and deep sleeping patterns. The lifestyle variables that affect the prevalence of disease were different by ethnic groups. In conclusion, ethnicity was shown to be an independent factor in relation to self-rated health, alcohol use, and other health lifestyle behaviors.

  • PDF

The Comparative Study on Health-promoting Behavior, Life Satisfaction and Self-esteem between Korean Elderly and American-Korean Elderly (한국노인과 미국이민 한국노인의 건강증진 행위, 생활만족도 및 자아존중감의 비교 연구)

  • Choi, Yeon-Hee
    • Journal of Korean Academy of Community Health Nursing
    • /
    • v.14 no.4
    • /
    • pp.667-675
    • /
    • 2003
  • Purpose: This study was purposed to provide basic data for developing future health promotion programs by comparing health-promoting behavior, life satisfaction and self-esteem between the Korean elderly and the American-Korean elderly. Methods: The subjects were volunteer participants of 120 elders in the Gyeongsan City in Korea and 120 elders in the state of Washington in the U.S. Tools used in this study were Health Promoting Lifestyle Profile (47 items), Life Satisfaction Scale (20 items) and Self-Esteem Scale (10 items). To analyze data, this study used frequency, percentage, chi-square test, t-test, Kendal tau test, Pearson's correlation coefficient with SPSS program. Results: 1) The average score of health-promoting behaviors was 3.21 in Koreans and 3.50 in American-Koreans, showing a significant difference between the two groups. 2) The sub-scales that got the highest score of health-promoting behaviors were self-actualization and nutrition(M=3.41) in Koreans and nutrition(M=3.61) in American-Koreans, and that with the lowest score was exercise in both groups(2.89 in Koreans and 3.02 in American-Koreans). 3) The average score for life satisfaction was 2.76 in Koreans and 3.06 in American-Koreans, showing a significant difference between the two groups. 4) The average score for self-esteem was 3.39 in Koreans and 3.09 in American-Koreans, showing a insignificant difference between the two groups. 5) Health-promoting behaviors were positively related to life satisfaction and self-esteem. Life satisfaction was positively related to self-esteem in both groups. Conclusions: According to the results of this study, the health-promoting behaviors of Korean and American-Korean elders strongly correlated with life satisfaction and self-esteem. Therefore, health promoting programs that enhance life satisfaction and self-esteem should be developed in order to promote the elderly's healthy lifestyle.

  • PDF

A Comparative Study of Housing Cultures between Korean-Immigrants and Australians in Melbourne, Australia (호주인과 호주교민의 주공간 사용 및 주생활을 통한 주거문화 비교에 관한 연구 - 멜버른(Melbourne)을 중심으로)

  • Lee Young-Shim
    • Journal of Korean Home Management Association
    • /
    • v.24 no.1
    • /
    • pp.159-179
    • /
    • 2006
  • Each ethnic group has different cultural backgrounds and each culture has developed with its own traditions. The interaction between different cultures is getting more active through acculturation and cultural contacts. The purpose of this study was to compare domestic living of Korean immigrants with Australians in the form of a Cross-Cultural study. For this, usage of domestic space and seating style of 52 Korean households and 53 Australian households in Melbourne were analyzed. Ethnographic research with questionnaire was used. The results of the research were as follows. 1. The most popular type of Living-Dining-Kitchen arrangement was L+ K. D for Koreans and L. D . K for Australians. 2. A laundry room was indispensable for both and they all wanted to do ironing in there as well as dry. Both were satisfied with the type which toilet was separated from the bathroom Drain hole on the floor of the bathroom was not indispensable for most Koreans and Australians. 3. Koreans and Australians were doing various activities in living area and both were getting together around kitchen(dining) area. The particular thing of Koreans was that they were using the main bedroom with multiple purpose. 4. The seating style of Koreans and Australians belong to chair-seating style generally. But Koreans were using floor seating style in making bed for the guest and making Kimchi. Koreans and Australians were using mixed style of floor seating and chair-seating in relaxing time with watching TV, treating guest or so. 5. Koreans were not satisfied with using carpet cause of dust but Australians were satisfied with the carpet cause of warmness. 6. Most Koreans and Australians were take off shoes inside of the house. Koreans were organize shoes around the front door of the house usually and Australians were organize shoes in bedroom usually. 7. The most popular heating system was ducted heating for both. The level of satisfaction about ducted heating was low for Koreans because they though that it could contaminate air. Australians were satisfied with ducted heating because they though that this one was fit on the weather of this area. 8. Living room was the most important one for Koreans and Australians and they also thought it should be decorated well for entertaining guests. Most Koreans were estimate that the brightness of the light of the house was not enough but it was estimated to moderate for Australians on the contrary.