• Title, Summary, Keyword: Live Yeast Culture

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Effect of Feeding Live Yeast Culture on Performance of Laying Hens (생효모배양물의 급여가 산란계의 생산성에 미치는 영향)

  • 이을연;이봉덕;지설하;박홍석
    • Korean Journal of Poultry Science
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    • v.22 no.2
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    • pp.77-84
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    • 1995
  • In order to investigate the effect of feeding live yeast culture on the performance of laying hens, a feeding trial was conducted with 96 20-wk-old Hy4ine brown layers during their laying period of 60 wk. The live yeast culture used was a product from Saccharomyces cerevisiae that was cultured on the corn-based substrate followed by careful drying of whole material not to lose the viability of yeast. Three levels of yeast culture as 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0% for three treatments and 0% for the control were included in the experimental diets. The feeding trial was carried out for 60 wk from August 26, 1992 to October 26, 1993. To evaluate the performance of layers during cold or hot periods as affected by the yeast culture feeding, data from the 12-wk winter period and 12-wk summer period were separated and analyzed accordingly. During 60 wk of laying period hen-day egg production was slightly but significantly(P<.05) improved by feeding the yeast culture. The average egg weight and daily egg weight(g /day) were also increased by the yeast culture. Feeding the yeast culture did not increase feed intake but feed efficiency was improved significantly (P<.05). No significant difference was detected in egg or eggshell qualities between control and yeast culture-treated groups. Feed intake and egg weight were not affected by the yeast culture feeding under both cold and hot period, but egg production and feed efficiency during hot summer improved significantly by its feeding. This result indicates that the effectiveness of the yeast culture feeding is greater during summer than winter for laying hens.

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The Nutritive Value of Live Yeast Culture (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and Its Effect on Milk Yield, Milk Composition and Some Blood Parameters of Dairy Cows

  • Yalcin, Sakine;Yalcin, Suzan;Can, Plnar;Gurdal, Arif O.;Bagci, Cemalettin;Eltan, Onder
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.24 no.10
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    • pp.1377-1385
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    • 2011
  • This study was conducted to determine the nutritive value of live yeast culture (RumiSacc, Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and to investigate its effects on milk yield, milk composition and some blood parameters in lactating cows. Six multiparous Holstein cows were allocated to two groups of three cows and assigned randomly to one of two diets in a cross-over experiment. Daily 50 g RumiSacc was top dressed at the p.m. feeding for the treatment group. RumiSacc supplied a high protein and energy with high organic matter digestibility values (83.35%) determined by in vitro enzymatic analysis. Yeast culture supplementation significantly increased milk yield, tended to increase fat yield, protein yield and lactose yield of milk. Methylated fatty acid level of 18:3 (n-3) in milk fat was increased by yeast culture supplementation. The concentrations of methionine, phenyalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan and taurine were significantly increased with dietary inclusion of yeast culture. Live yeast culture supplementation did not affect other performance characteristics, milk quality characteristics and blood parameters. As a conclusion live yeast culture (RumiSacc, Saccharomyces cerevisiae) had high nutritive value and positive effects on milk production and some milk quality characteristics in lactating cows under field conditions.

The Effects of Live Yeast and Yeast Culture Supplementation on the Performance of Broiler Chickens -Effects of Yeast Products on the Broiler Chickens- (활성효모 및 효모배양물의 첨가가 육계의 생산성에 미치는 영향 -육계에 있어서 효모제품의 첨가효과-)

  • 유종석;남궁환;백인기
    • Korean Journal of Poultry Science
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    • v.18 no.3
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    • pp.167-181
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    • 1991
  • In order to study the effects of dietary yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) products on the performance of broiler chickens, tow feeding trial using Arbor Acres strain were conducted. In experiment 1, 200 hatched male broiler chickens were divided into groups of 10 birds each and four groups were given each of the five dietary treatments : control, 0.25% yeast culture supplemented (YC-0.25%), 2.5% yeast culture supplemented(YC-2.5%), 0.05% live yeast supplemented(LY-0.05%) and 0.1% live yeast supplemented(LY-0.1%) . In experiment 2, 240 hatched broiler chickens(120 birds in each sex) were assigned to 2$\times$3(sex$\times$feed) factorial design Dietary treatments were control, 0.1% live yeast supplementation in finisher diet(LY-Finisher) , and 0.1% live yeast supplementation in whole period (LY-Whole). Results of experiment 1 showed that weight gain, feed intake and mortality were not significantly different among treatments. However, weight .gain of YC-0.25% and LY-0.1% tended to be greater than other treatments after 3wks of age Feed efficiency of LY-0.05% was poorer than those of control, YC-0.25% and LY-0.1% . Although nutrients availabilities were not significantly different among treatments, availiabilities of Ca and P were greater in yeast products supplemented groups than in control group. The number of Lactobacillus spp., Streptococcus spp . and yeast in small intestine tended to be greater in supplemented groups while that of Coliforms bacteria tended to be greafter in control group. In experiment 2, there were significant effects of factors (feed and sex) and interaction on growth rate. LY-Whole groups showed best weight gain in male while LY-Finisher groups did best in female broiler chickens. Feed intake and mortality were significantly higher in male broiler chickens. Feed$\times$sex interaction had a significant effect on feed efficiency. LY-Whole groups showed best feed efficiency in male while LY-Finisher did best in female broiler chickens. Availabilities of dry matter, Ca and P were higher in male than in female broiler chickens. Availabilities of Ca and P were higher in live yeast supplemented groups than in control groups. Live yeast supplemented groups tended to have greater number of Lactobacillus spp . and yeast in the small intestine and Stre))tococcu spp. in the small intestine and cecum, and lesser number of Coliforms bacteria in the small intestine The pH of small intestinal contents tended to be higher in live yeast supplemented groups.

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The Culture of free-swiming Copepod Secies Apocyclops sp. (Copepod; Cyclopoida)by baking Yeast (빵 이스트를 먹이로 이용한 부유성 코페포다 Apocyclops sp.(Copepod: Cyclopoida)의 배양)

  • Jung, Min-Min;Kim, Hyeung-Sin;Rho, Sum;Rumengan, Innke F.M.;Hagiwara, Atsushi
    • Journal of Aquaculture
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    • v.12 no.4
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    • pp.303-307
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    • 1999
  • Copepod is useful live food organism in the larval rearing. However of fin fish, culcures of copepod species (Specially calanoida and cyclopoida) were very difficult under artificial management conditions. In this study, we report successful culture of a free swimming cyclopodia copepod species (Apocyclops sp.) by easily baker's yeast as food. The maximum culture density of Apocyclops sp. was observed 11,200±2,660 ind/ℓ during the 30 days culture periods in the 1.5ℓ culture tanks. The nauplii were growth up maximum density 6,400±432 ind/ℓ on day 16th. The number of egg carring female was observed maximum density (666.7 ind./ℓ) of two times after 6days and 28 days of initial culture.

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Evaluation of Six Species Ciliates as a Live Food and Culture Environment for Euplotes sp. (먹이생물로써의 섬모충 6종의 평가와 Euplotes sp.의 배양 환경)

  • Yoo Jin Hyung;Hur Sung Bum
    • Korean Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
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    • v.35 no.4
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    • pp.342-347
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    • 2002
  • Ciliates have the possibility of a new live food in marine finfish culture because of their wide range of body size, thin tell wall, show motility, and fast reproduction rate. In this research, six species of ciliates were isolated from south coast and salt pond in Korea. The fitness of these species as a live food was evaluated in terms of size, motility, suspensibility and cell density. As the result, Euplotes sp. (K-1) was found suitable to be a new live food which might substitute rotifers, Brachionus plintilis and B. rotundiformis in fish larvae culture. The modified $F{\emptyset}yn's$ Erdschreiberd media, MErds-2 with the addition of glycine, glucose and yeast extract increased six times higher growth rate of Euplotes sp. (K-1) than the basic F$\emptyset$yn's Erdschreiberd media. The optimum water temperature, pH and light intensity for this ciliates were $22.5^{\circ}C$, 8 and 2,000 lux, respectively, and its culture environmental range was relatively wide, On the other hand, this ciliate fed baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cererisiae grew up to 1,240 inds./mL with the inocula of 100 inds./mL within 7 days. The results of the study showed that Euplotes sp. (K-1) has a potential to be utilized as a new live food in fish larvae culture.

Optimum Culture Environment of the Benthic Copepod, Tigriopus japonicus (부착성요각류 Tigriopus japonicus의 최적배양환경)

  • PARK Huem Gi;HUR Sung Bum
    • Journal of Aquaculture
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    • v.6 no.3
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    • pp.147-157
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    • 1993
  • The harpacticoid copepod, Tigriopus japonicus is one of the most important zooplankton as a live food for the production of marine fish fry. Thus, the salinity tolerance and the optimum culture environment of this copepod in terms of salinity, temperature and light were examined. The food values of 6 kinds of phytoplankters and 2 kinds of yeast were also investigated for mass culture of this copepod. The results are as follows: After 5 day culture in the experiment of salinity tolerance, the survival rates of the gravid female at $0\%\;and\;90%o\;were\;40\%\;and\;70\%$, respectively. However, at salinity ranging from $2\%o\;to\;80\%o$, high survival rates above $85\%$ were observed. It means T. japonicus is very euryhalinous species. Temperature was more important factor than salinity for the fecundity of T. japonicus. The optimum culture conditions of this species were $24^{\circ}C,\;24\%o$, and 3,000 lux with 24 L: 0D. Under these culture conditions, the average fecundity from a gravid female per spawning was 38 nauplii, and the interval time between spawnings were 2.05 days. Phaeodactylum tircornutum seemed to be the most suitable phytoplankton as a live food for T. japonicus, and the large chlorophyta, Tetraselmis suecica showed the lowest food value among 6 phytoplankters and 2 yeasts. The food value of w-yeast was better than that of baker's yeast, and it is similar to that of phytoplankton such as Amphora sp., Chlorella ellipsoidea and Nannochloris oculata. So, the w-yeast seems to be appropriate food source for mass culture of T. japonicus.

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Effects of Temperature, Salinity, and Diet on the Growth and Survival of the Freshwater Rotifer Brachionus angularis

  • Kim, Byeong-Ho;Kim, Hyung-Seop;Jo, Soo-Gun
    • Fisheries and aquatic sciences
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    • v.9 no.4
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    • pp.160-166
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    • 2006
  • We explored the possibilities of using the freshwater rotifer Brachionus angularis as a live food for small fishes cultured in fresh- or brackish waters. Brachionus angularis were collected from a reservoir for isolation and laboratory culture. Length and width of the lorica were $102.3{\mu}m$ and $76.6{\mu}m$, respectively, and those of amictic eggs were $64.4{\mu}m\;and\;47.9{\mu}m$, respectively. When their growth rates were examined at six different temperatures, i.e., 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, and $40^{\circ}C$, the highest daily growth rate of 0.801 was observed at $35^{\circ}C$, and growth was lower with decreasing temperature. Adaptation to salinity change was evaluated with two different modes of salinity increase: step-wise elevation lasting for short durations of 5 to 30 min or a long duration of 24 h. With the short duration modes, no individuals survived salinity higher than 10 psu, and the number of live individuals did not increase throughout the experiment. However, in the 24-h elevation, the number of individuals increased when salinity was elevated by 1 to 2 psu per day for the first 2 or 3 days, while no increase in number occurred at salinity increments higher than 3 psu per day. In addition, to assess the effect of different diets, four single-component diets (Chlorella vulgaris, Nannochloris sp., baker's yeast, or dry yeast) and three combination diets (C. vulgaris + Nannochloris sp. + baker's yeast + dry yeast; C. vulgaris 70% + baker's yeast 30%; C. vulgaris 30% + baker's yeast 70%) were used. The specific growth rates of B. angularis fed combination diets were higher than those of rotifers fed any single-component diet, with the highest rate of 0.648 in B. angularis fed a mixture of C. vulgaris, Nannochloris sp., baker's yeast, and dry yeast, and the lowest rate of 0.200 in those fed dry yeast only. Our results indicate that the freshwater rotifer B. angularis can be used for seedling production of both freshwater and brackish-water fishes that require small (less than about $120{\mu}m$) live food during their early stages.

Supplemental Enzymes, Yeast Culture and Effective Micro-organism Cultureto Enhance the Performance of Rabbits Fed Diets Containing High Levels of Rice Bran

  • Shanmuganathan, T.;Samarasinghe, K.;Wenk, C.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.17 no.5
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    • pp.678-683
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    • 2004
  • An experiment was carried out to study the effects of exogenous enzymes (cellulases and proteases), yeast culture and effective micro-organism (EM) culture on feed digestibility and the performance of rabbits fed rice bran rich diets over a period of ten weeks. Twenty four, 8 to 9 weeks old male and female New Zealand White rabbits were allotted to 4 dietary treatments; a basal (control) feed containing 43% rice bran, basal feed supplemented with either enzymes, yeast culture or EM. Individual feed intake, body weight gain, nutrient digestibility, carcass characteristics and feed cost were studied. Sex of the rabbits had no significant (p<0.05) influence on the parameters studied. The control group showed the lowest daily feed intake (104.8 g), body weight gain (12.8 g) and the highest feed/gain ratio (8.20 g/g). The highest daily feed intake (114.3 g), body weight gain (20.42 g) and the lowest feed/gain ratio (5.60) were observed with enzymes. Compared to the control, yeast significantly (p<0.05) improved the feed intake, body weight gain and feed/gain ratio by 4.9, 34.4 and 22.0%, respectively, while EM improved (p<0.05) them by 4.0, 32.6 and 21.6%, respectively. All the additives improved (p<0.05) the digestibility of dry matter, crude protein, crude fiber and energy by 4.9-8.7, 3.6-10.7, 5.9-8.3 and 4.3-6.4%, respectively. Higher weights of pancreas (by 38.5-56.4%) and caecum (by 13.1-26.8%, compared to the control) were recorded with all additives but liver weight was increased only by yeast (24.5%) and enzymes (26.7%). Significantly (p<0.05) higher carcass recovery percentages were observed with enzymes (60.55), yeast (60.47) and EM (56.60) as compared to the control (48.52). Enzymes, yeast and EM reduced (p<0.05) the feed cost per kg live weight by 23.8, 15.9 and 15.5%, respectively. Results revealed that enzymes, yeast culture and EM can be used to improve the feeding value of agro-industrial by-products for rabbits in Sri Lanka and thereby to reduce the feed cost. Under the present feeding system, enzyme supplement was the best.

Design, Fabrication, and Application of a Microfluidic Device for Investigating Physical Stress-Induced Behavior in Yeast and Microalgae

  • Oh, Soojung;Kim, Jangho;Ryu, Hyun Ryul;Lim, Ki-Taek;Chung, Jong Hoon;Jeon, Noo Li
    • Journal of Biosystems Engineering
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    • v.39 no.3
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    • pp.244-252
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    • 2014
  • Purpose: The development of an efficient in vitro cell culture device to process various cells would represent a major milestone in biological science and engineering. However, the current conventional macro-scale in vitro cell culture platforms are limited in their capacity for detailed analysis and determination of cellular behavior in complex environments. This paper describes a microfluidic-based culture device that allows accurate control of parameters of physical cues such as pressure. Methods: A microfluidic device, as a model microbioreactor, was designed and fabricated to culture Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under various conditions of physical pressure stimulus. This device was compatible with live-cell imaging and allowed quantitative analysis of physical cue-induced behavior in yeast and microalgae. Results: A simple microfluidic-based in vitro cell culture device containing a cell culture channel and an air channel was developed to investigate physical pressure stress-induced behavior in yeasts and microalgae. The shapes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii could be controlled under compressive stress. The lipid production by Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was significantly enhanced by compressive stress in the microfluidic device when compared to cells cultured without compressive stress. Conclusions: This microfluidic-based in vitro cell culture device can be used as a tool for quantitative analysis of cellular behavior under complex physical and chemical conditions.

Evaluation of Different Yeast Species for Improving In vitro Fermentation of Cereal Straws

  • Wang, Zuo;He, Zhixiong;Beauchemin, Karen A.;Tang, Shaoxun;Zhou, Chuanshe;Han, Xuefeng;Wang, Min;Kang, Jinhe;Odongo, Nicholas E.;Tan, Zhiliang
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.29 no.2
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    • pp.230-240
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    • 2016
  • Information on the effects of different yeast species on ruminal fermentation is limited. This experiment was conducted in a $3{\times}4$ factorial arrangement to explore and compare the effects of addition of three different live yeast species (Candida utilis 1314, Saccharomyces cerevisiae 1355, and Candida tropicalis 1254) at four doses (0, $0.25{\times}10^7$, $0.50{\times}10^7$, and $0.75{\times}10^7$ colony-forming unit [cfu]) on in vitro gas production kinetics, fiber degradation, methane production and ruminal fermentation characteristics of maize stover, and rice straw by mixed rumen microorganisms in dairy cows. The maximum gas production (Vf), dry matter disappearance (IVDMD), neutral detergent fiber disappearance (IVNDFD), and methane production in C. utilis group were less (p<0.01) than other two live yeast supplemented groups. The inclusion of S. cerevisiae reduced (p<0.01) the concentrations of ammonia nitrogen ($NH_3$-N), isobutyrate, and isovalerate compared to the other two yeast groups. C. tropicalis addition generally enhanced (p<0.05) IVDMD and IVNDFD. The $NH_3$-N concentration and $CH_4$ production were increased (p<0.05) by the addition of S. cerevisiae and C. tropicalis compared with the control. Supplementation of three yeast species decreased (p<0.05) or numerically decreased the ratio of acetate to propionate. The current results indicate that C. tropicalis is more preferred as yeast culture supplements, and its optimal dose should be $0.25{\times}10^7$ cfu/500 mg substrates in vitro.