• Title, Summary, Keyword: Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGING IN 37 MRI SYSTEM

  • Park, Jeong-Il;Choi, Kim-S.;Choe, Bo-Young;Suh, Tae-Suk;Lee, Hyoung-Koo;Shin, Kyung-Sub;Lee, Heung-Kyu
    • Proceedings of the Korean Society of Medical Physics Conference
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    • pp.423-424
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    • 1999
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Comparison Analysis of Donor Liver Volumes Estimated with 3D Magnetic Resonance and 3D Computed Tomography Image Data

  • Kim, Myeong-Seong;Park, Kyeong-Seok;Cho, Jae-Hwan
    • Journal of Magnetics
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    • v.19 no.3
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    • pp.261-265
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    • 2014
  • Three-dimensional computed tomography is an effective tool to estimate the liver volume of living donors for the live liver transplantation. When additional operation is required, magnetic resonance imaging is conducted to determine the safety of the donor. This study compared the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography in estimating 3D liver volume of 23 male and 7 female donors who underwent both magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography tests before the transplantation. The analysis was conducted to see whether the liver's estimated total volumes and the left lobe volumes obtained from 3D-magnetic resonance imaging and 3D-computed tomography were identical. Volumes of the right lobe estimated with 3D-magnetic resonance imaging and 3D-computed tomography were compared with the actual volume of the right lobe harvested in the operating room because the volume of the right lobe is an important determinant in the safety of the donor. The total volume of the liver estimated from 3D-magnetic resonance imaging and 3D-computed tomography differed (1238.1904 units and 1402.364 units respectively). The left lobe volume of the liver estimated with 3D-magnetic resonance imaging and 3D-computed tomography also differed (450.530 units and 554.490 units, respectively). The right lobe volume of the liver estimated with 3D-magnetic resonance imaging and 3D-computed tomography were 787.660 units and 847.545 units, respectively, while the actual average right lobe volume of the harvested liver was 678.636 units. 3D-computed tomography has been widely used to estimate the right lobe volume of the donors' liver. However, 3D-magnetic resonance imaging was also very effective in estimating the volume of the liver. Thus, 3D-magnetic resonance imaging is also expected to become an important tool in determining the safety of the donors before transplantation.

Breast Magnetic Resonance Image (MRI) Guideline: Breast Imaging Study Group of Korean Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Recommendations

  • Choi, Seon Hyeong;Kang, Bong Joo;Jung, Seung Eun
    • Investigative Magnetic Resonance Imaging
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    • v.22 no.4
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    • pp.205-208
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    • 2018
  • The purpose of this study is to establish an appropriate protocol for breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the discipline of image quality standards. The intention of the protocol is to increase effectiveness of medical image information exchange involved in construction, activation, and exchange of clinical information for healthcare.

Accessory Belly of the Piriformis Muscle as a Cause of Piriformis Syndrome: a Case Report with Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Neurography Imaging Findings

  • Kim, Hae-Jung;Lee, So-Yeon;Park, Hee-Jin;Kim, Kun-Woo;Lee, Young-Tak
    • Investigative Magnetic Resonance Imaging
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    • v.23 no.2
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    • pp.142-147
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    • 2019
  • Piriformis syndrome caused by an accessory belly of the piriformis muscle is very rare. Only a few cases have been reported. Here, we report a case of piriformis syndrome resulting from an extremely rare type of accessory belly of the piriformis muscle originated at the proximal third portion of the main piriformis muscle and attached separately to the greater trochanter inferior to the insertion of the main piriformis muscle. A definitive diagnosis of piriformis syndrome was made based on magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance neurography findings that were consistent with results of nerve conduction study and needle electromyography.

$^{19}F$ MR Imaging of 5-FU Metabolism in Mice

  • Chaejoon Cheong;Lee, Seung-C.;Jae-G. Seo;Kim, Sung W.;Lee, Chulhyun;Kim, Chul S.;Taegyun Yang
    • Journal of the Korean Magnetic Resonance Society
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    • v.5 no.2
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    • pp.110-117
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    • 2001
  • $^{19}$ F imaging of mice was carried out. For $^{19}$ F imaging, 5-flouro-uracil (5-FU) was injected into a mouse and in vivo detection of the catabolism of 5-FU to a-fluoro-P-alanine (FBAL) was carried out. The chemical shift selective (CHESS) imaging technique was employed. The 19F spectra and images give temporal and spatial information of the metabolism for 5-FU in mice.

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HIGH QUALITY $^1$H SPECTROSCOPY ON 3.0T MRI

  • Kim, Tae-Yong;Kim, S. Choi;Lee, Heung-Kyu;Park, Jeong-Il;Choe, Bo-Young;Suh, Tae-Suk;Lee, Hyoung-Koo;Shinn, Kyung-Sub
    • Proceedings of the Korean Society of Medical Physics Conference
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    • pp.172-173
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    • 1999
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Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MR Imaging of Tietze's Syndrome: a Case Report

  • Kim, Dong Chan;Kim, Sang Yoon;Kim, Bong Man
    • Investigative Magnetic Resonance Imaging
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    • v.24 no.1
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    • pp.55-60
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    • 2020
  • Tietze's syndrome is an inflammatory condition associated with painful swelling of the costochondral, costosternal, and sternoclavicular joints. Tietze's syndrome has been mostly attributed to microtrauma until now; however, this etiology is currently disputed. The diagnosis is based on clinical findings, although a few studies suggest the advantages of imaging. We report a case of Tietze's syndrome with a review of radiological findings, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with dynamic contrast enhancement.

Recurrent Neuro-Sweet Disease Associated with Preceding Upper Respiratory Infection: a Case Study

  • Suh, Hie Bum;Kim, Hak Jin
    • Investigative Magnetic Resonance Imaging
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    • v.22 no.3
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    • pp.187-193
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    • 2018
  • Sweet's syndrome also known as acute neutrophilic dermatosis is a multisystem inflammatory disorder characterized by fever, malaise, leukocytosis, and skin lesions. Sweet's syndrome affects multiple organs though only rarely does it affect the central nervous system (CNS) when it does it is called Neuro-Sweet disease (NSD). We report on a case study of a biopsy-proven NSD in a 50 year old man. Serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed repeated CNS involvement of Sweet's syndrome after a respiratory tract infection preceded it. On the MRI, T2 hyperintense lesions occurred at multiple sites and disappeared after steroid therapy.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Intermolecular Double Quantum Coherences

  • Ahn, Sang-Doo
    • Journal of the Korean Magnetic Resonance Society
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    • v.8 no.2
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    • pp.108-114
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    • 2004
  • Recently a new method for magnetic resonance imaging based on the detection of relatively strong signal from intermolecular multiple quantum coherences (iMQCs) is reported. Such a signal would not be observable in the conventional framework of magnetic resonance; it originates in long-range dipolar couplings that are traditionally ignored. In this paper, we present the results of experimental studies to assess the feasibility of intermolecular double quantum coherences (iDQCs) imaging in humans. We show that the iDQC images are readily observable at 4T and that they do indeed provide different contrast than appears in conventional images.

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Physical Principles of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Animal (동물에서 자기 공명 영상 진단의 물리적 원리)

  • 김종규
    • Journal of Veterinary Clinics
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    • v.16 no.1
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    • pp.75-79
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    • 1999
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an imaging technique used to produce high quality images of the inside of the animal body. MRI is based on the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and started out as a tomographic imaging technique, that is it produced an image of the NMR signal in a thin slice through the animal body. The animal body is primarily fat and water, Fat and water have many hydrogen atoms. Hydrogen nuclei have an NMR signal. For these reasons magnetic resonance imaging primarily images the NMR signal from the hydrogen nuclei. Hydrogen protons, within the body align with the magnetic field. By applying short radio frequency (RF) pulses to a specific anatomical slice, the protons in the slice absorb energy at this resonant frequency causing them to spin perpendicular to the magnetic field. As the protons relax back into alignment with the magnetic field, a signal is received by an RF coil that acts as an antennae. This signal is processed by a computer to produce diagnostic images of the anatomical area of interest.

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