• Title, Summary, Keyword: Medicinal Plant

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Development of molecular biological techniques for the differentiation of medicinal plant species (약용작물의 기원 판별에 관한 분자생물학적 기술 개발 현황)

  • Han, Eun-Heui;Kim, Yun-Hee;Lee, Shin-Woo
    • Journal of Plant Biotechnology
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    • v.42 no.1
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    • pp.6-12
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    • 2015
  • Medicinal plants resources are becoming important assets since their usages have been expanded to the development of functional foods for human health, more attractive cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries. However, their phylogenetic origins and names are different from each country and quite often they are mixed each other resulting in the confusion for consumers. In particular, when they are very similar based on their morphological characteristics and distributed as dried roots, it is extremely difficult to differentiate their origins even by specialists. Recently, "DNA barcodes" have been extensively applied to identify their origin of medicinal plant species. In this review, we tried to overview the current research achievements for the development of suitable "DNA barcodes" regarding to the differentiation of medicinal plant species. Furthermore, more advanced techniques including amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS)-PCR, multiplex single base extension (MSBE), high-resolution melting (HRM) curve analyses are also discussed for their practical applications in the authentification of particular medicinal plant species.

Distribution of Cd and Pb Accumulated in Medicinal Plant Roots and Their Cultivation Soils

  • Seo, Byoung-Hwan;Kim, Hyuck Soo;Bae, Jun-Sik;Kim, Won-Il;Hong, Chang-Ho;Kim, Kwon-Rae
    • Korean Journal of Soil Science and Fertilizer
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    • v.48 no.4
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    • pp.278-284
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    • 2015
  • In general, plant roots accumulate more heavy metals than the above ground organs such as leaf, stem, and fruit. This implies that root medicinal plants would be an issue with excessive heavy metal accumulation. Therefore, the current study was carried out to investigate the distribution of heavy metal (focused on Cd and Pb) concentrations in soils and medicinal plant roots grown in different region of Korea. Total 293 samples for each soil and plant were collected along the national wide. Soil pH, total and phytoavailable metal concentrations (1 M $NH_4NO_3$ extracted) in soils were determined and heavy metal concentrations in root of the medicinal plants were analyzed. Heavy metal concentrations of the soil samples studied were not exceeded standard limits legislated in 'Soil Environmental Conservation Act', except 2 samples for Cu. However, substantial amount of Cd was accumulated in medicinal plant roots with 29% samples exceeding the standard limit legislated in 'Pharmaceutical Affairs Act' while all plant samples were lower than the standard limit value for Pb. Also the current study demonstrated that cadmium concentrations in the roots were governed by the phytoavailable Cd in soils, which decreased as soil pH increased. From this result, application of heavy metal immobilization technique using a pH change-induced immobilizing agents can be suggested for safer root medicinal plant production.

Ecological Distribution of Medicinal Plants in Miho Stream, Korea (충남 미호천 일대 약용식물의 생태적 분포)

  • Song, Hong-Seon;Seo, Joung-Seok;Nam, Yun-Gyu;Ahn, Young-Sup;Park, Chung-Berm;Kim, Seong-Min
    • Korean Journal of Medicinal Crop Science
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    • v.19 no.6
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    • pp.407-413
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    • 2011
  • This study was analyzed and investigated to evaluate ecological distribution of medicinal plants in Miho Stream of Korea. Totality 463 taxa of vascular plants were appeared in lower part of Miho Stream. Medicinal plants were distributed 253 taxa, which were 54.6% of the total vascular plants appeared. Medicinal plants of official drug compendium(Korean pharmacopoeia) were 85 taxa. Medicinal plants were distributed most of the forest area, and followed field surrounding, stream surrounding and paddy surrounding respectively. The distribution of life form hemicryptophyte was the most frequent. Plant community of appearing area of medicinal plants was classified into Salix koreensis, Phragmites japonica, Echinochloa crusgalli, Artemisia selengensis, Miscanthus sacchariflorus, Setaria faberii, Panicum dichotomiflorum, Bidens frondosa, Humulus japonicus, Monochoria vaginalis var. plantaginea, Eleocharis kuroguwai, Erigeron acris, Pinus densiflora, Pinus rigida, Quercus acutissima, Quercus serrata, Robinia pseudoacacia and Castanea crenata community. Medicinal plants in plant communities that occur frequently were Humulus japonicus, Corylus heterophylla and Liriope spicata.

A Fundmental Study on the Medicinal Plant For Cut Plants (절화로 이용할 수 있는 약용식물에 관한 기초 연구)

  • 서병기
    • Korean Journal of Plant Resources
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    • v.8 no.2
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    • pp.143-151
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    • 1995
  • The development of medicinal plants for cut plants and landscape plants were conducted through the literiture survey. The results were as follows: We selected 38 species of medicinal plants including 7 medicinal woody plants for cut plant and landscape plants from 450 medicinal plants. There were 8 species of Compositae, 4 species Ranunculaceae, 3 species Rosaceae and Umbelliferae, 2 species Polygonaceae and Campanulaceae respectively. The anthesis of Cornus officinalis, Magnolia denudata, Forsythia koreana of medicinal woody plants flowering before leaf spreading come to early than the anthesis of other medicinal plants. There were 4 species(11%) over 10cm of the flower diameter, 6 species(16%) over 5cm below 10cm, 19 species(50%) over 1cm below 5cm and 9 species(24%) 1cm below. In terms of flower color, 11 species(29%) were white, 9 species(24%) yellow, 6 pecies(16%) red, 5 species(13%) violet and 3 species(8%) were blue aided violet. In terms of the flowering by month, 12 species(32%) on July, 9 species(24%) on May, 6 species(16%) on June and August respectively, and 3 species(8%) on March. The most medicinal plants were propagated by division and seeding easily, but woody medicinal plants of 7 species of this study were propagated by cutting and grafting easily. The percentage of usage of parts of medicinal plants including woody medicinal plants was that roots were 20 species(53%), flowers 6 species(16%), fruits and all part of medicinal plants were 4 species(11%), and seeds and stem including leaves 2 species(5%) respectively.

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Molecular markers based on chloroplast and nuclear ribosomal DNA regions which distinguish Korean-specific ecotypes of the medicinal plant Cudrania tricuspidata Bureau

  • Lee, Soo Jin;Shin, Yong-Wook;Kim, Yun-Hee;Lee, Shin-Woo
    • Journal of Plant Biotechnology
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    • v.44 no.3
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    • pp.235-242
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    • 2017
  • Cudrania tricuspidata Bureau is a widely-used, medicinal, perennial and woody plant. Obtaining information about the genetic diversity of plant populations is highly important with regard toconservation and germplasm utilization. Although C. tricuspidata is an important medicinal plant species registered in South Korea, no molecular markers are currently available to distinguish Korean-specific ecotypes from other ecotypes from different countries. In this study, we developed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers derived from the chloroplast and nuclear genomic sequences, which serve to to identify distinct Korean-specific ecotypes of C. tricuspidata via amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS)-PCR and high resolution melting (HRM) curve analyses. We performed molecular authentication of twelve C. tricuspidata ecotypes from different regions using DNA sequences in the maturaseK (MatK) chloroplast intergenic region and nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. The SNP markers developed in this study are useful for rapidly identifying specific C. tricuspidata ecotypes from different regions.

Anticancer Activity of Sageretia theezans in Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

  • Kim, Ha Na;Park, Su Bin;Kim, Jeong Dong;Jeong, Hyung Jin;Jeong, Jin Boo
    • Proceedings of the Plant Resources Society of Korea Conference
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    • pp.108-108
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    • 2018
  • In this study, we evaluated the anti-cancer effect of extracts of leaves (ST-L) and branches (ST-B) from Sageretia theezans in human colorectal cancer cells. ST-L and ST-B significantly inhibited the proliferation of human colorectal cancer cells, SW480. ST-L and ST-B decreased cyclin D1 protein level through the induction of cyclin D1 proteasomal degradation via $GSK3{\beta}$-dependent threonine-286 phosphorylation of cyclin D1. In addition, ST-L and ST-B increased HO-1 protein through p38, ROS and $GSK3{\beta}$-dependent Nrf2 activation. These findings suggest that ST-L and ST-B may have great potential for the development of anti-cancer drug to treat human colorectal cancer.

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Analyses of Organic Acids and Phenolic Compounds in Columbia Coffee Bean in Roasting Process

  • Park, Jongsun;Kim, Yongsung;Yeon, Jihun;Woo, Jongwook;Seo, Youmi;Mun, Jeong-Yun;Choi, Ji-Soo;Park, Min-Jeong;Im, Jong-Yun;Jang, Tae-Won;Park, Jae-Ho
    • Proceedings of the Plant Resources Society of Korea Conference
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    • pp.88-88
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    • 2018
  • Coffee is one of the most popular drinks in the world. Roasting process of coffee bean is one of major steps to make coffee, however, there are few studies which analyzed chemical compounds in intermediate state of roasting coffee beans due to technical limitations to get coffee beans with the same roasting condition. We utilized Stronghold S7 pro roasting machine which guarantees the saming roasting conditions repletively with the aid of precise computer to control heat sources to get 20 steps (every 30 seconds) of roasted coffee beans during roasting process (10 min in total). Along with roasting process, phenolic compounds were decreased, which can be explained that roasting process cause phenolic compounds degradation. Caffeine is almost constant during roasting, reflecting that caffeine is not affected in roasting process. These samples presents that organic acids significantly increase along with the roasting process by HPLC analysis. With additional analysis of coffee beans, such as moisture contents, pH, as well as coffee tastes, our analysis will show detailed process of chemical compounds of coffee beans during roasting process.

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Assessment of β-Lactamase Inhibitor Potential of Medicinal Plant Extracts against Antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

  • Dawan, Jirapat;Ahn, Juhee
    • Korean Journal of Plant Resources
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    • v.33 no.6
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    • pp.578-585
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    • 2020
  • This study was designed to assess the possibility of using medicinal plant extracts as β-lactamase inhibitors to control antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The susceptibilities of S. aureus ATCC 15564 (SAWT), ciprofloxacininduced S. aureus ATCC 15564 (SACIP), oxacillin-induced S. aureus ATCC 15564 (SAOXA), and clinically-isolated S. aureus CCARM 3008 (SACLI) to ampicillin were determined in the absence and presence of medicinal plant extracts, including Cleyera japonica (CJ), Carpinus laxiflora (CL), Euphorbia helioscopia (EH), Euscaphis japonica (EJ), Oenothera erythrosepala (OE), and Rosa multiflora (RM). The phenotypic change in the clear inhibition zones around ampicillin disc was observed for SAWT, SACIP, and SAOXA, indicating the production of ampicillinase. Compared to the controls, the MICs of ampicillin against SAWT, SACIP, and SAOXA were decreased from 4 to 0.5 ㎍/mL in the presence of CL, 16 to 4 ㎍/mL in the presence of RM, and 32 to 2 ㎍/mL in the presence of CL, EH, and RM, respectively. The medicinal plant extracts, OE, EJ, and CL, effectively inhibited the β-lactamase activities of SAWT (78%), SACIP (57%), and SAOXA (76%) when compared to the control. This results suggest that the medicinal plant extracts can be used as BLIs to control the antibiotic-resistant S. aureus.