• Title, Summary, Keyword: Milk Composition

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Development of the Humanized Milk Part 1. Relative Nutritional Value, Preparation Chemical Composition of Humanized milk and Comparison of Commercial Products (Humanized Milk제조에 관한 연구 제 1 보 모유화분유 조제와 외국산제품과의 비교)

  • Yoo, Y.J.;Lee, T.L.;Kim, S.H.;Han, D.B.;Koh, J.B.;Jung, C.E.
    • Korean Journal of Food Science and Technology
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    • v.6 no.2
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    • pp.91-97
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    • 1974
  • This paper was developed for production of the humanized milk, comprising similarly to the composition and characteristic of human milk. Humanized milk of superior quality can be made directly from the fresh raw milk mixed vegetable oil, corn syrup, whey powder, ${\beta}-lactose$, sugar, vitamin, ${\beta}-carotene$ and minerals showing formulation of the humanized milk at table 2. The improving effects of adding vegetable oil and corn syrup are both more reformed the chemical and physical properties of humanized milk. The former enhanced the essential fatty acid and energy source in this product, the latter has the most solving function in water and induced amount of emulsion and stabilizer. The products contain about 13% protein, 23% fat, 58.3% carbohydrate, 2% ash and ensue reasonably balance of essential amino acid, poly-unsaturated fatty acid for the requirement of infants and controlled component of the humanized milk such as human milk.

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Effects of Dandelion (Taraxzcum coreanum) Supplementation on Milk Yield, Milk Compositions and Blood Characteristics in Lactating Dairy Cows

  • Cho, Jung Youl;Kim, Eun Joong;Lee, Sang Moo
    • Journal of The Korean Society of Grassland and Forage Science
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    • v.35 no.3
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    • pp.217-224
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    • 2015
  • This study aimed to investigate the effects of Dandelion (Taraxzcum coreanum) supplementation on milk yield, milk composition and blood characteristics in lactating dairy cows. Eight lactating dairy cows were divided into two groups (control: TMR supplementation, treatment: TMR with Dandelion supplementation). The milk yield, milk fat, lactose, solids not fat (SNF) and somatic cells counts (SCC) were not significantly different between the control group and the treatment group, whereas milk protein, milk urea nitrogen (MUN) and free fat acid (FFA) were significantly higher in the treatment group compared to the control (p<0.05). The blood components of the treatment group were compared with those of the control group and only aspartate aminotransferase (AST) appeared significantly high (p<0.05). The other blood components were not significantly different in the two groups. Blood corpuscle components in the groups were not significantly different. Especially, all blood corpuscle components in the treatment group were within the normal range. However, the white blood cells (WBC), lymphocytes (LYM) and hematocrits (HCT) in the control group exceeded the normal range. Based on the above results, the addition of Dandelion to feed increased milk protein, MUN and FFA, but did not significantly affect the composition of the blood and corpuscle in Holstein milking cows.

A Study on the Fatty Acid Composition of Mare Milk using GLC (GLC를 이용한 마유의 지방산 조성에 관한 연구)

  • Kim, Kee-Sung;Kim, Ji-Seon;Shin, Mi-Soon;Lim, Sang-Dong;Shim, Jin-A;Jang, Eun-Hee;Yang, Seung-Yong;Park, Sung-Hae;B. Delger
    • Food Science of Animal Resources
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    • v.23 no.2
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    • pp.145-149
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    • 2003
  • This study was to compare the fatty acid composition of mare milk with cow milk in liquid, powder, cream and oil by gas-liquid chromatography. This study was to compare the fatty acid composition of mare milk with cow milk in liquid, powder, cream and oil by gas-liquid chromatography. These results showed that overall fatty acid concentration of mare milk was much higher than that of cow milk especially linoleic acid(C18:2) and linolenic acid(C18:3). The concentrations of oleic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid of mare milk were higher than those of cow milk in liquid, powder, cream and oil.

Effect of the Difference in the High Molecular Weight Fraction of Whey Between Cow's Milk and Goat's Milk on Creaming Phenomenon

  • Masuda, T.;Taniguchi, T.;Suzuki, K.;Sakai, T.;Morichi, T.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.14 no.3
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    • pp.351-357
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    • 2001
  • The rapid formation of a cream line cannot be observed in raw goat's milk standing at a low temperature. Although the poor creaming ability of goat's milk has been considered to be due to the small size of milk fat globules and the lack of euglobulin capable of being adsorbed on milk fat globules, there is much left to study. The present work attempted to elucidate a factor for poor creaming ability of goat's milk. The creaming ability of the experimental milks reconstituted from creams and skim milks separated from cow's milk or goat's milk was measured by the volume of the cream layer and the fat content of bottom layer. The polypeptides composition of the P1 the fraction (i.e., the high molecular weight fraction eluted near the void volume obtained by the gel filtration of whey) and milk fat globule membrane prepared from both milks were compared. It was found that the promotion of creaming originated from goat's skim milk was lower than that from cow's skim milk. The P1 fraction in goat's skim milk was less than that in cow's skim milk. The polypeptide (M.W. $4.3{\times}10^4$), found in the P1 fraction of cow's milk was not found in the P1 fraction of goat's milk. It is suggested that the poor creaming ability of goat milk is caused mainly by the difference from cow milk in the amount and the composition of the P1 fraction.

Composition of Mineral Contents in Korean Cow무s Milk (우리나라 일부 우유의 무기질 함량 조성에 관한 연구)

  • 이영희;정문호
    • Journal of Environmental Health Sciences
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    • v.30 no.1
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    • pp.29-40
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    • 2004
  • This study was performed to investigate and assess the composition of mineral and macronutrient contents in Korean cow′s milk.48 individual farm raw milk, 10 plant raw milk and 29 market milk were collected from June to August in 2003. The minerals such as calcium(Ca), potassium(K), magnesium(Mg), sodium(Na), zinc(Zn), iron(Fe) and phosphorus(P) were determined by using atomic absorption spectrometer(AAS). The macronutrients such as fat, protein and lactose were tested by using IR spectrometer. The obtained analytical results of minerals(mg/100 g) and rnaetronutrients (%) are as follows:1. In case of raw cow′s milk ; Ca 113.56, K 144.09, Mg 10.86, Na 42.53, Zn 0.42, Fe 0.030, p 113.32, fat 3.85, protein 3.08, lactose 4.80,2. In case of market cow′s milk ; Ca 103.04, K 142.46, Mg 10.27, Na 43.21, Zn 0.40, Fe 0.034. p 97.30, fat 3.78, protein 3.05, lactose 4.70,3. In case of fortified market cow′s milk ; Ca 165.40, K 145.79, Mg 10.57. Na 42.55, Zn 0.57, Fe 0.414, p 94.68, fat 3.74, protein 3.08, lactose 4.68,4. In case of processed market cow′s milk ; Ca 134.72, K 142.74, Mg 10.33, Na 45.07, Zn 0.50, Fe 0.650, p 92.48, fat 3.72, protein 3.07, lactose 4.74. According to the group of market milk(milk, fortified market row′s milk, processed market cow′s milk), the mean concentration of Ca and Fe were significantly higher in fortified and processed milk than milk(p<0.05). There were no significant differences in macronutrient(fat, protein, lactose) and mineral contents between pasteurized milk and UHT(ultra high temperature) treated milk($\alpha$=0.05). The labeled "Nutritional Facts" of market milk were satisfied with "Labeling Standards for Livestock Products of Korea". The measured mean concentrations of Ca, Fe, Zn were generally higher than lower limit of labeled value(above 80% of labeled value). The mean concentration of sodium was lower than upper limit of labeled value(below 120% of labeled value).

Pelleting in Associated with Sodium Monensin Increases the Conjugated Linoleic Acids Concentration in the Milk of Dairy Cows Fed Canola Seeds

  • De Marchi, Francilaine Eloise;Romero, Jakeline Vieira;Damasceno, Julio Cesar;Grande, Paula Adriana;Zeoula, Lucia Maria;dos Santos, Geraldo Tadeu
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.28 no.8
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    • pp.1095-1104
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    • 2015
  • To evaluate the effects of the pelleting and the addition of sodium monensin on production, the chemical and lipid composition of milk and butter physical characteristics, 4 Holstein dairy cows (135 days of lactation) with an average milk production of 14.7 kg/d, were supplemented with a concentrate containing ground canola seeds. The cows were assigned to a $4{\times}4$ Latin square design with a $2{\times}2$ factorial arrangement of treatments: i) ground maize, soybean meal, mineral and vitamin supplements, and ground canola seeds (CG); ii) CG concentrate with 31.5 mg of monensin added per kg of dry matter (DM); iii) CG pelleted concentrate; iv) CG concentrate with monensin addition pelleted. There was no difference in milk production and composition. The addition of monensin increased milk concentration of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), the PUFA/saturated fatty acids (SFA) ratio, and omega 6. The pelleting increased the concentration of monounsaturated fatty acids, the PUFA/SFA ratio, and the omega 6/omega 3 ratio, but decreased the concentration of SFA. The association between pelleting and the addition of monensin increased the concentration of conjugated linoleic acids by 46.9%. The physical characteristics of butter were not affected by the evaluated diets. We concluded that the concentrate with 31.5 mg of monensin added per kg DM basis combined with the pelleting improves the lipid composition of milk from Holstein cows that are on pasture and supplemented with ground canola seeds, without changing the production, milk composition, and spreadability of butter.

Microbiome Study of Initial Gut Microbiota from Newborn Infants to Children Reveals that Diet Determines Its Compositional Development

  • Ku, Hye-Jin;Kim, You-Tae;Lee, Ju-Hoon
    • Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology
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    • v.30 no.7
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    • pp.1067-1071
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    • 2020
  • To understand the formation of initial gut microbiota, three initial fecal samples were collected from two groups of two breast milk-fed (BM1) and seven formula milk-fed (FM1) infants, and the compositional changes in gut microbiota were determined using metagenomics. Compositional change analysis during week one showed that Bifidobacterium increased from the first to the third fecal samples in the BM1 group (1.3% to 35.1%), while Klebsiella and Serratia were detected in the third fecal sample of the FM1 group (4.4% and 34.2%, respectively), suggesting the beneficial effect of breast milk intake. To further understand the compositional changes during progression from infancy to childhood (i.e., from three weeks to five years of age), additional fecal samples were collected from four groups of two breast milk-fed infants (BM2), one formula milk-fed toddler (FM2), three weaning food-fed toddlers (WF), and three solid food-fed children (SF). Subsequent compositional change analysis and principal coordinates analysis (PCoA) revealed that the composition of the gut microbiota changed from an infant-like composition to an adult-like one in conjunction with dietary changes. Interestingly, overall gut microbiota composition analyses during the period of progression from infancy to childhood suggested increasing complexity of gut microbiota as well as emergence of a new species of bacteria capable of digesting complex carbohydrates in WF and SF groups, substantiating that diet type is a key factor in determining the composition of gut microbiota. Consequently, this study may be useful as a guide to understanding the development of initial gut microbiota based on diet.

Effect of Feeding Calcium Salts of Palm Oil Fatty Acids on Performance of Lactating Crossbred Cows

  • Purushothaman, Sajith;Kumar, Anil;Tiwari, D.P.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.21 no.3
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    • pp.376-385
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    • 2008
  • Twenty lactating crossbred cows yielding 10 to 15 litres of milk daily during mid lactation were selected and divided into four groups of five animals to assess the effect of feeding calcium soaps of palm oil fatty acids (bypass fat) on milk yield, milk composition and nutrient utilization in lactating crossbred cows. The animals in groups 1 (control), 2, 3 and 4 were fed concentrate mixture containing 0 (no bypass fat), 2, 4 and 6% bypass fat, respectively. The average daily dry matter consumption in the various groups ranged from 13.1 to 13.6 kg and showed no significant difference among treatment groups. There was no significant difference among different groups in digestibility of DM, OM, CP and CF, however, ether extract digestibility in cows of groups 2 and 4 was significantly (p<0.05) higher than the control group. The average milk yields of the cows in group 3 (4% bypass fat) showed a significantly (p<0.05) higher value than cows of groups 1 and 2. Similarly, a significant (p<0.05) increase in fat yield, 4% FCM yield and SNF yield was observed for the cows in group 3 (4% bypass fat). The milk composition in terms of total solids, fat, lactose, protein, solids-not-fat and ash percentage showed a varying response and bypass fat feeding did not have any effect on milk composition of cows in different groups. The gross and net energetic efficiency of milk production ranged from 23.6 to 27.5% and 37.1 to 44.4%, respectively, and showed no significant difference among different treatment groups. The gross and net efficiency of nitrogen utilization for milk production ranged from 24.0 to 28.7% and 37.2 to 43.5%, respectively, and no significant difference was noted among different treatment groups. The supplementation with calcium salts of palm oil fatty acid reduced the proportion of caproic, caprylic and capric acids and significantly (p<0.01) increased the concentration of palmitic, oleic, stearic, linoleic and linolenic acids in milk fat with increase in level of bypass fat supplementation. It was concluded that incorporation of calcium salts of palm oil fatty acids at a 4% level in the concentrate mixture of lactating crossbred cows improved the milk production and milk quality in terms of polyunsaturated fatty acids without affecting the digestibility of nutrients.

Physico-Chemical Characteristics of Mongolian Goat, Sheep and Cow Milk

  • Chuluunbat, Tsend-Ayush;Yoon, Yoh-Chang;Kim, Soo Yeon
    • Journal of Dairy Science and Biotechnology
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    • v.31 no.2
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    • pp.93-98
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    • 2013
  • For purposes of substantiation of organizing measures on industrial processing of goat's and sheep's milk in Mongolia and the production of dairy products we have conducted the studied physico-chemical characteristics of the Mongolian goat's and sheep's milks especially to recognize amino acids, minerals and vitamins in the milk and compare with the Mongolian cow's milk. And also was studied fractional structure of goat's milk whey proteins.

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Analysis of the Fatty Acid Composition of Cow's Milk Fat by Gas Liquid Chromatogrohy with Temperature Programming (Gas Liguid Chromatography에 의한 우유의 지방산 조성에 관한 연구)

  • Shin, Jong-Choul;Lee, Jung-Keun;Yoo, Young-Jin;Park, Ke-In
    • Korean Journal of Food Science and Technology
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    • v.4 no.3
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    • pp.213-223
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    • 1972
  • This paper chose the methods of methylesterification of the use of methoxide, the mixture solution of methanol-benzen-sulfuric acid in transesterification of the fat in cow's milk and modified powder milk and separated by gas liquid chromatography with F.F.A.P., D.E.G.A. as liquid phase. Quantitative analysis of the fatty acid of milk fat in cow's milk and modified powder milk was determined by gas liquid chromatography using the method of temperature programming which should be used to obtain satisfactory separation of short chain fatty acid on the chromatogram. It was found that the fatty acid composition of cow's milk and modified powder milk are all the major fatty acid of milk fat obtained by GLC analysis. Main components was found to be from butyric acid to arachidonic acid showing Fig. 3, 4, 5 and Table 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9.

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