• Title, Summary, Keyword: Mycelial growth

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Suitable Conditions for Mycelial Growth of Phellinus spp.

  • Hur, Hyun;Imtiaj, Ahmed;Lee, Min-Woong;Lee, Tae-Soo
    • Mycobiology
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    • v.36 no.3
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    • pp.152-156
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    • 2008
  • The fungus Phellinus is a mushroom that is widely used medicinally. The optimal conditions for mycelial growth of 13 strains of the fungus were investigated. Mycelial growth was optimal at 25$^{\circ}C$ and was uniformly minimal at 15$^{\circ}C$ and 35$^{\circ}C$. Growth was optimal at pH 6$\sim$7. The mycelial phenotype was best promoted by growth using Potato Dextrose agar, Hamada, Glucose peptone, and Yeast-Malt media, whereas Czapek Dox, Hennerberg, and Lilly media were the most unfavorable for the mycelial growth of Phellinus spp. Glucose, sucrose, fructose, and dextrin were the most suitable carbon sources for mycelial growth, while lactose, maltose, and galactose were unsuitable. Among tested nitrogen sources, ammonium phosphate, potassium nitrate, and arginine best promoted mycelial growth, while alanine, urea, and histidine least promoted mycelial growth.

Cultural Characteristics and Log-Mediated Cultivation of the Medicinal Mushroom, Phellinus linteus

  • Hur, Hyun
    • Mycobiology
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    • v.36 no.2
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    • pp.81-87
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    • 2008
  • The optimal conditions for mycelial growth of Phellinus linteus ATCC 26710 were determined to be a log length of 20 cm, temperature of $30^{\circ}C$ and pH of 6.0. Mycelial growth was excellent on the mushroom complete medium, and was optimal when sucrose, man nose and glucose were supplied as carbon sources. Potassium nitrate and sodium nitrate as nitrogen sources supported good mycelial growth. To evaluate P. linteus mycelial colonization on logs, sterilized short log inoculation, drilling inoculation and log-end sandwich inoculation techniques were used. Only sterilized short log inoculation produced good mycelial colonization. Initial mycelial growth and full mycelial colonization were best on 20 cm logs having 42% moisture content. The initial mycelial growth of P. linteus was accelerated over 12hr of sterilization. Basidiocarp formation was optimal using a burying method of logs after $5{\sim}6$ months, and fruiting body formation was superior in cultivation house conditions of $31{\sim}35^{\circ}C$ and in excess of 96% relative humidity.

In Vitro Antagonistic Effects of Bacilli Isolates against Four Soilborne Plant Pathogenic Fungi

  • Kim, Wan-Gyu;Weon, Hang-Yeon;Lee, Sang-Yeob
    • The Plant Pathology Journal
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    • v.24 no.1
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    • pp.52-57
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    • 2008
  • Twenty isolates of Bacillus spp. obtained from livestock manure composts and cotton-waste composts were tested for in vitro antagonistic effects against soilborne plant pathogenic fungi, Fusarium oxysporum, Phytophthora capsici, Rhizoctonia solani AG-4, and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Seven isolates of Bacillus spp. had antagonistic effects on mycelial growth of all the isolates of F. oxysporum tested. The bacterial isolate RM43 was the most effective to inhibit the mycelial growth of the fungal isolates. Twelve isolates of Bacillus spp. had antagonistic effects on mycelial growth of all the isolates of P. capsici tested. The bacterial isolates M34 and M47 were very effective to inhibit the mycelial growth of the fungal isolates. Thirteen isolates of Bacillus spp. had antagonistic effects on mycelial growth of all the isolates of R. solani AG-4 tested. The bacterial isolates M27 and M75 were very effective to inhibit the mycelial growth of the fungal isolates. Fourteen isolates of Bacillus sp. had antagonistic effects on mycelial growth of all the isolates of S. sclerotiorum tested. The bacterial isolates M49 and M75 were very effective to inhibit the mycelial growth of the fungal isolates. The antagonistic effects of most Bacillus spp. isolates against the isolates of the four fungi differed depending on the fungal species and the isolates of each fungus. The bacterial isolates M27 and M75 were the most effective to inhibit the mycelial growth of all four fungi.

Favorable Culture Conditions for Mycelial Growth of Korean Wild Strains in Ganoderma lucidum

  • Jayasinghe, Chandana;Imtiaj, Ahmed;Hur, Hyun;Lee, Geon-Woo;Lee, Tae-Soo;Lee, U-Youn
    • Mycobiology
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    • v.36 no.1
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    • pp.28-33
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    • 2008
  • Ganoderma lucidum (Fr.) Karst (Polyporaceae), belonging to basidiomycota, is one of the most famous medicinal mushrooms. This study was carried out to investigate favorable mycelial growth conditions, such as pH, temperature, growth media, carbon sources and nitrogen sources of Korean strains in G. lucidum. The most suitable temperature for the mycelial growth was obtained at $30^{\circ}C$. In general, optimal temperature range for the mycelial growth was found at $25{\sim}30^{\circ}C$. This Mushroom has a broad pH range ($5{\sim}9$) for its mycelial growth and mostly favorable growth was found at pH 5. Generally, Hamada, Glucose peptone, YM, Mushroom complete and Lilly media were the most suitable for the mycelial growth of G. lucidum. Among 10 different carbon sources, dextrin, galactose and fructose were best but the rest of other carbon sources also facilitated the growth of mycelia. The most suitable nitrogen sources were ammonium acetate, glycine, arginine and calcium nitrate, but to a certain extent, all of the supplemented nitrogen sources also stimulated the mycelial growth.

Inhibitive Activity of Cow Urine and Cow Dung against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum of Cucumber

  • Basak, A.B.;Lee, Min-Woong;Lee, Tae-Soo
    • Mycobiology
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    • v.30 no.3
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    • pp.175-179
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    • 2002
  • A study on comparative efficacy and in vitro activity of fresh cow urine and cow dung for controlling Sclerotinia rot caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum of cucumber was carried out following mycelial growth inhibition test, treated and untreated sclerotia with these organic matters at different days of incubation. Results showed that cow urine suppressed more effectively the mycelial growth even after 5 days of incubation in comparison to cow dung. The highest inhibition 75.9% of mycelial growth was recorded in cow dung potato dextrose agar(CUPDA) after 3 days of incubation and least 22.7% was in cow dung potato dextrose agar(CUPDA) after same days of incubation. Mycelial growth from sclerotia of S. sclerotiorum was also influenced by PDA medium mixed with cow urine and cow dung. After 6 days of incubation in CUPDA mycelial growth was only 12.9 mm whereas in CDPDA and PDA the corresponding growth at the same time were 65.8 mm and 80.0 mm. Treated sclerotia of the selected fungus with cow urine had a very effective role on suppression of mycelial growth than that of untreated one. No mycelial growth was observed up to 4 days in treated sclerotia with cow urine. After 5 days only 0.9 mm mycelial growth was measured in treated sclerotia, while in case of untreated sclerotia the growth was 42.6 mm. Application of cow urine and cow dung on growing plants inoculated with the pathogen at different concentrations also proved their inhibitive effects.

In vitro Inhibition Effect of Plant Extracts, Urine, Fertilizers and Fungicides on Stem Rot Pathogen of Sclerotium rolfsii

  • Alam, Shahidul;Islam, M. Rafiqul;Sarkar, Montaz Ali;Alam, M.S.;Han, Kee-Don;Shim, Jae-Ouk;Lee, Tae-Soo;Lee, Min-Woong
    • Mycobiology
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    • v.32 no.3
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    • pp.128-133
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    • 2004
  • Twenty plant extracts were tested against mycelial growth, sclerotium formatiom and dry weight of mycelium with sclerotia of Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc. The highest(90 mm) mycelial growth was measured in Adhatoda vasica, Tegetes erecta, Allium cepa, and Curcuma longa. The lowest(25 mm) was in Azadirachta indica. No mycelial growth was found in any concentration of cow, buffalo, and goat urine. The highest(90 mm) and the lowest(15 mm) mycelial growth were measured in Biomil and Urea, respectively. No mycelial growth was observed in Zinc. The highest(60 mm) and the lowest(2 mm) mycelial growth were recorded in Macuprex(Dodine; 65% WP) and Boron(100% Boric acid and 17% Boron) respectively. Mycelial growth was totally inhibited in Rovral(Iprodione; 50% WP).

Growth and Cultural Characteristics of Cordyceps cardinalis Collected from Korea

  • Sung, Gi-Ho;Shrestha, Bhushan;Han, Sang-Kuk;Kim, Soo-Young;Sung, Jae-Mo
    • Mycobiology
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    • v.38 no.4
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    • pp.274-281
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    • 2010
  • Cordyceps cardinalis was reported in Japan and the USA in 2004, and its fruiting bodies have recently been cultured in Korea. Herbarium specimens preserved at the Cordyceps Research Institute, Mushtech, Korea were revised and identified as C. cardinalis, based on morphological characters and conidial structures. Most of the C. cardinalis specimens were collected from Mt. Halla in Jeju-do. The effects of various nutritional sources and environmental conditions such as temperature and pH on mycelial growth of C. cardinalis were studied. Oatmeal agar, Martin's peptone dextrose agar, and Schizophyllum (mushroom) genetics complete medium plus yeast extract resulted in the best mycelial growth. Among carbon sources, cereals, and nitrogen sources, maltose, oatmeal, and peptone resulted in the best mycelial growth respectively. Mineral salts helped to increase growth rate but only resulted in thin mycelial density, similar to water agar. A temperature of $25^{\circ}C$ and a pH of 7 resulted in the highest mycelial growth. Based on these results, a Cordyceps cardinalis composite medium (CCM) was formulated with 1% maltose, 2% oatmeal, 1% peptone, and 2% agar. Use of the CCM resulted in slightly better mycelial growth than that of other commonly used agar media. Only organic nitrogen sources imparted a reddish pigmentation to the agar media, but this character diminished after several subcultures. A 7 day culture duration resulted in the best mycelial growth.

Exopolysaccharide Production and Mycelial Growth in an Air-Lift Bioreactor Using Fomitopsis pinicola

  • Choi, Du-Bok;Maeng, Jeung-Moo;Ding, Ji-Lu;Cha, Wol-Suk
    • Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology
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    • v.17 no.8
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    • pp.1369-1378
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    • 2007
  • For effective exopolysaccharide production and mycelial growth by a liquid culture of Fomitopsis pinicola in an air-lift bioreactor, the culture temperature, pH, carbon source, nitrogen source, and mineral source were initially investigated in a flask. The optimal temperature and pH for mycelial growth and exopolysaccharide production were $25^{\circ}C$ and 6.0, respectively. Among the various carbon sources tested, glucose was found to be the most suitable carbon source. In particular, the maximum mycelial growth and exopolysaccharide production were achieved in 4% glucose. The best nitrogen sources were yeast extract and malt extract. The optimal concentrations of yeast extract and malt extract were 0.5 and 0.1%, respectively. $K_2HPO_4\;and\;MgSO_4{\cdot}7H_2O$ were found to be the best mineral sources for mycelial growth and exopolysaccharide production. In order to investigate the effect of aeration on mycelial growth and exopolysaccharide production in an air-lift bioreactor, various aerations were tested for 8 days. The maximum mycelial growth and exopolysaccharide production were 7.9 g/l and 2.6 g/l, respectively, at 1.5 vvm of aeration. In addition, a batch culture in an air-lift bioreactor was carried out for 11 days under the optimal conditions. The maximum mycelial growth was 10.4 g/l, which was approximately 1.7-fold higher than that of basal medium. The exopolysaccharide production was increased with increased culture time. The maximum concentration of exopolysaccharide was 4.4 g/l, which was about 3.3-fold higher than that of basal medium. These results indicate that exopolysaccharide production increased in parallel with the growth of mycelium, and also show that product formation is associated with mycelial growth. The developed model in an air-lift bioreactor showed good agreement with experimental data and simulated results on mycelial growth and exopolysaccharide production in the culture of F. pinicola.

Optimization of Submerged Culture Conditions for Mycelial Growth and Exopolysaccharides Production by Agaricus blazei

  • Kim, Hyun-Han;Na, Jeong-Geol;Chang, Yong-Keun;Chun, Gie-Taek;Lee, Sang-Jong;Jeong, Yeon-Ho
    • Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology
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    • v.14 no.5
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    • pp.944-951
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    • 2004
  • The influences of inoculum size, pH, and medium composition on mycelial growth and exopolysaccharides (EPS) production were investigated in shake flasks and in a bioreactor. The optimum inoculum size for both mycelial growth and EPS production was identified to be 10% (v/v) in shake flask cultures. The optimal initial pH for mycelial growth and EPS production in shake flask cultures were found to be 5.0 and 7.0, respectively. However, the optimal pH was 5.0 for both mycelial growth and EPS production in bioreactor cultures where the pH was regulated. The optimal mass ratio of the two major carbon sources, glucose to dextrin, was 1:4. The optimal mass ratio of the two major nitrogen sources, yeast extract to soy tone peptone, was 2:1. When 500 mg $1^{-1}$ of $MnSO_4-5H_2O$ was added to the bioreactor culture, both mycelial growth and EPS production were enhanced by approximately 10%. Under the optimized conditions, a mycelial biomass of 9.85 g $1^{-1}$ and an EPS concentration of 4.92 g $1^{-1}$ were obtained in 4 days.

The Effect of Some Herbicides on Mycelial Growth, Productivity and Germinability of Sclerotium of Cortictum sasakii(Shirai) Matsumoto (문고병균(紋枯病菌)(Corticium sasakii)의 균사생장(菌絲生長), 균핵형성(菌核形成) 및 균핵발아(菌核發芽)에 미치는 몇가지 제초제(除草劑)의 영향(影響))

  • Yu, Seung Hun;Park, Jong Seong
    • Korean Journal of Agricultural Science
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    • v.2 no.1
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    • pp.49-59
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    • 1975
  • This study was done to find out the effect of seven widely used herbicides on mycelial growth, productivity and germ inability of sclerotium of Corticiurm sasakii growing on artificial media. The results obtained are as follows: (1) 2,4-D amine inhibited at 5 to 1000ppm mycelial growth and at 2.5 to 1000ppm sclerotia production. At normal field rate, though mycelial growth and sclerotia production were inhibited highly. sclerotial germinability were inhibited slightly. (2) MCP inhibited at 10 to 1000ppm mycelial growth and at 500 to 1000ppm sclerotia production. At normal field rate, though mycelial growth and sclerotia production were inhibited highly, sclerotial germinability were inhibited slightly. (3) DCPA and PCP inhibited highly or perfectly at 2.5 to 1000ppm mycelial growth and sclerotia production. Also sclerotial germinability was inhibited highly at normal field rate. (4) MO inhibited at 125 to 1000ppm mycelial growth and at 10 to 1000ppm sclerotia production. At normal field rate, though mycelial growth was not inhibited, sclerotial germinabitity was inhibited moderately. (5) CP-53619 inhibited at 2.5 to 1000ppm mycelial growth and at 10 to 1000ppm sclerotia production. At normal field rate, though mycelial growth and sclerotia production were inhibited moderately, sclerotial germinability was inhibited little. (6) NPE inhibited at 5 to 1000ppm mycelial growth and at 10 to 1000ppm sclerotia production. At normal field rate, mycelial growth, productivity and germinability of sclerotium were inhibited slightly.

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