• Title, Summary, Keyword: Nectriaceae

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Penicillifer diparietisporus: a New Record from Field Soil in Korea

  • Das, Kallol;Back, Chang-Gi;Lee, Seung-Yeol;Jung, Hee-Young
    • The Korean Journal of Mycology
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    • v.46 no.3
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    • pp.227-233
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    • 2018
  • A fungus was isolated from field soil collected from Daegu, Korea. The colony of the isolated fungus showed short, branched, and light to dark yellow pigments with hyaline, yellowish red to orange brown aerial mycelia. In addition, the fungus produced solitary to aggregated perithecia, ovoid to pyriform, short neck, and asci as well as biseriately arranged ascospores. Phylogenetic analysis using the internal transcribed spacer region and translation elongation factor $1-{\alpha}$ sequences and morphological characteristics identified the isolated fungus as Penicillifer diparietisporus, which belongs to the family Nectriaceae. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Penicillifer diparietisporus in Korea.

A New Record of Volutella ciliata Isolated from Crop Field Soil in Korea

  • Babu, Anam Giridhar;Kim, Sang Woo;Yadav, Dil Raj;Adhikari, Mahesh;Kim, Changmu;Lee, Hyang Burm;Lee, Youn Su
    • Mycobiology
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    • v.43 no.1
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    • pp.71-74
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    • 2015
  • During a survey of fungal species in South Korea, a species of Volutella ciliata was isolated and described based on the analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region of its rDNA and its morphological characteristics. This is the first record of Volutella ciliata isolated from crop field soil in Korea.

Unique Phylogenetic Lineage Found in the Fusarium-like Clade after Re-examining BCCM/IHEM Fungal Culture Collection Material

  • Triest, David;De Cremer, Koen;Pierard, Denis;Hendrickx, Marijke
    • Mycobiology
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    • v.44 no.3
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    • pp.121-130
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    • 2016
  • Recently, the Fusarium genus has been narrowed based upon phylogenetic analyses and a Fusarium-like clade was adopted. The few species of the Fusarium-like clade were moved to new, re-installed or existing genera or provisionally retained as "Fusarium." Only a limited number of reference strains and DNA marker sequences are available for this clade and not much is known about its actual species diversity. Here, we report six strains, preserved by the Belgian fungal culture collection BCCM/IHEM as a Fusarium species, that belong to the Fusarium-like clade. They showed a slow growth and produced pionnotes, typical morphological characteristics of many Fusarium-like species. Multilocus sequencing with comparative sequence analyses in GenBank and phylogenetic analyses, using reference sequences of type material, confirmed that they were indeed member of the Fusarium-like clade. One strain was identified as "Fusarium" ciliatum whereas another strain was identified as Fusicolla merismoides. The four remaining strains were shown to represent a unique phylogenetic lineage in the Fusarium-like clade and were also found morphologically distinct from other members of the Fusarium-like clade. Based upon phylogenetic considerations, a new genus, Pseudofusicolla gen. nov., and a new species, Pseudofusicolla belgica sp. nov., were installed for this lineage. A formal description is provided in this study. Additional sampling will be required to gather isolates other than the historical strains presented in the present study as well as to further reveal the actual species diversity in the Fusarium-like clade.

Soil Chemical Properties, Microbial Community and Ginseng Root Rot in Suppressive and Conducive Soil Related Injury to Continuously Cropped Ginseng (인삼 연작장해 유발토양과 억제토양의 화학성, 미생물상 및 뿌리썩음병 발생 특성)

  • Lee, Sung Woo;Lee, Seung Ho;Seo, Mun Won;Jang, In Bok;Kwon, Ra Yeong;Heo, Hye Ji
    • Korean Journal of Medicinal Crop Science
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    • v.28 no.2
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    • pp.142-151
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    • 2020
  • Background: Suppressive soil inhibits soil-borne diseases if pathogens are present, and ginseng does not show injury even if replanted in the same field. Methods and Results: Soil chemical properties and microbial community of soil were investigated in soil suppressive and conducive to ginseng root rot. Root rot disease in 2-year-old ginseng was tested by mixing conducive soil, with suppressive or sterilized suppressive soil. The root rot ratio in suppressive soil was 43.3% compared to 96.7% in conducive soil. Biological factors acted to inhibit the root rot because disease ratio was increased in the sterilized suppressive soil compared to that in non-suppressive soil. The suppressive soil had lower pH, nitrate nitrogen and sodium than the conducive soil. Dominat bacteria and fungi (more than 1.0%) were 3 and 17 species in conducive soil and 7 and 23 species in suppressive soil, respectively. The most predominant fungi were Pseudaleuria sp. HG936843 (28.70%) in conducive soil and Pseudogymnoascus roseus (7.52%) in suppressive soil. Conclusion: Microbial diversity was more abundant in the suppressive soil than in the conducive soil, and the proportion of pathogens (Nectriaceae sp.) causing root rot was significantly lower in the suppressive soil than in the conducive soil.