• Title, Summary, Keyword: Oenothera laciniata

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Antibacterial Activities of Oenothera laciniata Extracts (애기달맞이꽃(Oenothera laciniata Hill) 추출물의 항균활성)

  • Kim, Ji-Young;Lee, Jung-A;Park, Soo-Yeong
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Food Science and Nutrition
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    • v.36 no.3
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    • pp.255-259
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    • 2007
  • The solvent extracts of Oenothera laciniata, which were extracted by using several solvents with different polarities, were prepared for utility as a natural preservative. The O. laciniata extract by 80% ethanol was sequentially fractionated with n-hexane, dichloromethane, ethylacetate, and butanol. The antibacterial activities and cell growth inhibition were investigated on each strain with the different concentrations of O. laciniata extracts. Antibacterial activities were shown in ethanol, ethylacetate, and butanol fraction of O. laciniata. However n-hexane, dichloromethane and water fraction showed weak antibacterial activity against the tested microorganisms. Among the five fractions, ethylacetate fraction showed the highest antibacterial activities against microorganisms tested, such as Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium. The polyphenolic compounds widely occurring in the traditional medicine plants have been reported to possess high antibacterial activity. The polyphenolic compounds from ethanol, n-hexane, dichloromethane, ethylacetate, butanol, and water fraction were 63.96 mg/g, 8.49 mg/g, 28.11 mg/g, 172.64 mg/g, 114.56 mg/g, and 34.91 mg/g, respectively. There are some relationships between antibacterial activity and polyphenol content in natural plant. The ethylacetate fraction could be suitable for the development of a food preservative.

Biological Activities of Oenothera laciniata Extracts (Onagraceae, Myrtales) (애기달맞이꽃(Oenothera laciniata Hill) 추출물의 생리활성 탐색)

  • Lee, Jung-A;Kim, Ji-Young;Yoon, Weon-Jong;Oh, Dae-Ju;Jung, Yong-Hwan;Lee, Wook-Jae;Park, Soo-Yeong
    • Korean Journal of Food Science and Technology
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    • v.38 no.6
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    • pp.810-815
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    • 2006
  • The biological activities of Oenothera laciniata extracts were measured, including antioxidant activity and cytotoxic effects. O. laciniata is an endemic species of Jeju Island, Korea with a seaside habitat. The concentration of total polyphenolic compounds from ethanol (EtOH), n-hexane, dichloromethane ($CH_2Cl_2$), ethylacetate (EtOAc), butanol (BuOH), and water fractions of O. laciniata was 63.96, 8.49, 28.11, 172.64, 114.56, and 34.91 mg/g, respectively. The EtOAc fraction contained the highest antioxidative activities ($IC_{50}$), measured as follows: 16.19 ${\mu}g/mL$ in DPPH radical scavenging capacity, 220.37 ${\mu}g/mL$ in xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity, 42.07${\mu}g/mL$ in superoxide radical scavenging capacity, and 421.33 ${\mu}g/mL$ in nitric oxide scavenging capacity. The cytotoxicity of O. laciniata extracts was examined through their effect on the growth of HL-60 cells. Incubation of HL-60 cells with the EtOAc fraction resulted in the greatest inhibition of cell growth; high DNA fragmentation and numerous sub-G1 hypodiploid cells were observed in HL-60 cell cultures treated with the EtOAc fraction. These results suggest that the EtOAc fraction of O. laciniata has potent apoptotic and antioxidative activities in vitro.

Anti-Melanogenic Effect of Oenothera laciniata Methanol Extract in Melan-a Cells

  • Kim, Su Eun;Lee, Chae Myoung;Kim, Young Chul
    • Toxicological Research
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    • v.33 no.1
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    • pp.55-62
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    • 2017
  • We evaluated the antioxidant activity and anti-melanogenic effects of Oenothera laciniata methanol extract (OLME) in vitro by using melan-a cells. The total polyphenol and flavonoid content of OLME was 66.3 and 19.0 mg/g, respectively. The electron-donating ability, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical-scavenging activity, and superoxide dismutase (SOD)-like activity of OLME ($500{\mu}g/mL$) were 94.5%, 95.6%, and 63.6%, respectively. OLME and arbutin treatment at $50{\mu}g/mL$ significantly decreased melanin content by 35.5% and 14.2%, respectively, compared to control (p < 0.05). OLME and arbutin treatment at $50{\mu}g/mL$ significantly inhibited intra-cellular tyrosinase activity by 22.6% and 12.6%, respectively, compared to control (p < 0.05). OLME ($50{\mu}g/mL$) significantly decreased tyrosinase, tyrosinase-related protein-1 (TRP-1), TRP-2, and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor-M (MITF-M) mRNA expression by 57.1%, 67.3%, 99.0%, and 77.0%, respectively, compared to control (p < 0.05). Arbutin ($50{\mu}g/mL$) significantly decreased tyrosinase, TRP-1, and TRP-2 mRNA expression by 24.2%, 42.9%, and 48.5%, respectively, compared to control (p < 0.05). However, arbutin ($50{\mu}g/mL$) did not affect MITF-M mRNA expression. Taken together, OLME showed a good antioxidant activity and anti-melanogenic effect in melan-a cells that was superior to that of arbutin, a well-known skin-whitening agent. The potential mechanism underlying the anti-melanogenic effect of OLME was inhibition of tyrosinase activity and down-regulation of tyrosinase, TRP-1, TRP-2, and MITF-M mRNA expression.

Antioxidant and antiobesity activities of oral treatment with ethanol extract from sprout of evening primrose (Oenothera laciniata) in high fat diet-induced obese mice (달맞이순 (Oenothera laciniata) 에탄올 추출물 섭취가 고지방식이로 유도한 비만 마우스에서 항산화 및 비만억제효과)

  • Kwak, Chung Shil;Kim, Mi-Ju;Kim, Sun Gi;Park, Sunyeong;Kim, In Gyu;Kang, Heun Soo
    • Journal of Nutrition and Health
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    • v.52 no.6
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    • pp.529-539
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    • 2019
  • Purpose: Sprouts of evening primrose (Oenothera laciniata, OL) were reported to have high contents of flavonoids and potent antioxidant activity. This study examined the antioxidant and antiobesity activities of OL sprouts to determine if they could be a natural health-beneficial resource preventing obesity and oxidative stress. Methods: OL sprouts were extracted with 50% ethanol, evaporated, and lyophilized (OLE). The in vitro antioxidant activity of OLE was examined using four different tests. The antiobesity activity and in vivo antioxidant activity from OLE consumption were examined using high fat diet-induced obese (DIO) C57BL/6 mice. Results: The IC50 for the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging and superoxide dismutase (SOD)-like activities of OLE were 26.2 ㎍/mL and 327.6 ㎍/mL, respectively. OLE exhibited the ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) activity of 56.7 ㎍ ascorbic acid eq./mL at 100 ㎍/mL, and an increased glutathione level by 65.1% at 200 ㎍/mL compared to the control in the hUC-MSC stem cells. In an animal study, oral treatment with 50 mg or 100 mg of OLE/kg body weight for 14 weeks reduced the body weight gain, visceral fat content, fat cell size, blood leptin, and triglyceride levels, as well as the atherogenic index compared to the high fat diet control group (HFC) (p < 0.05). The blood malondialdehyde (MDA) level and the catalase and SOD-1 activities in adipose tissue were reduced significantly by the OLE treatment compared to HFC as well (p < 0.05). In epididymal adipose tissue, the OLE treatment reduced the mRNA expression of leptin, PPAR-γ and FAS significantly (p < 0.05) compared to HFC while it increased adiponectin expression (p < 0.05). Conclusion: OLE consumption has potent antioxidant and antiobesity activities via the suppression of oxidative stress and lipogenesis in DIO mice. Therefore, OLE could be a good candidate as a natural resource to develop functional food products that prevent obesity and oxidative stress.

Plants Invasion in Large-scale Cutting Slopes in the Part of Jeollanamdo (전라남도 일부지역 대규모 절토비탈면의 식물침입)

  • Park, Moon-Su
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Environmental Restoration Technology
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    • v.8 no.4
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    • pp.32-42
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    • 2005
  • To investigate the plants invasion process and dominant species in large-scale cutting slopes, slopes elapsed one year to thirteen years after construction had been selected in five counties. The obtained results are summarized as follows : The species of high appearance frequency were Alnus firma, Arundinella hirta, Miscanthus sinensi var. purpurascens, Erigeron cancdensis, Artemisia princeps var. orientalis, Oenothera odorata, Lactuca raddeana, Lactrca indica var. laciniata, Lespedeza bicolor, Youngia sonchifolia, Populus albaglandulosa, and so on. The biological type of identified vascular plants was $Ch-D_1-R_{5-e}$. In time, plant coverage was increased gradually and average of plant coverage was 1.17% in slopes which elapsed one year, 42.44% after six years, 56.67% after eight years, and 69.17% after ten years. The dominant species in the surveyed slopes were covered with Alnus firma, Artemisia princeps var. orientalis, Erigeron cancdensis, Miscanthus sinensi var. purpurascens, Arundinella hirta, Lactuca raddeana, Oenothera odorata, Boehmeria spicata, Kummerowia striata and Artemisia montana of the 59 species. The conditions of location in large-scale cutting slopes are hard to fix and germinate of seeds, and extend plant roots in the slope soil. Hence, the highly appearance species and dominance species of the area will make plant coverage quick and slope stable.

Selection of Replantation Species in Roadside Cutting-slope Area of the Baekdu Range (백두대간 도로 절토비탈면의 녹화수종 선정)

  • Song, Hokyung;Jeon, Giseong;Kim, Namchoon;Park, Gwansoo;Kwon, Hyejin;Lee, Jihye
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Environmental Restoration Technology
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    • v.10 no.3
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    • pp.52-59
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    • 2007
  • This study was carried out to select proper species for early stage replantation in cutting-slope area of the Baekdu Range roadside. In the cutting-slope area and upper forest area of the cutting-slope area, sample plots of 46 were selected and their vegetations and environmental factors were investigated. We found total 90 species in the 46 plots. We found Festuca arundinacea in 27 plots of the 46 plots. We also found Lespedeza bicolor in 26 plots, Eragrostis curvula in 22 plots, Artemisia princeps var. orientalis in 19 plots, Erigeron annuus and Pinus densiflora in 15 plots, Lactuca indica var. laciniata in 14 plots, Miscanthus sinensis in 13 plots, Oenothera odorata, Commelina communis, and Humulus japonicus in 11 plots, Lespedeza cuneata in 10 plots, Salix koreensis and Salix hulteni in 9 plots, Festuca rubra, Youngia denticulata, Aster scaber, and Festuca arundinacea in 8 plots, Chenopodium album var. centrorubrum in 7 plots, Patrinia villosa and Erigeron canadensis in 6 plots, and Setaria viridis, Digitaria sanguinalis, and Dactylis glomerata in 5 plots.The dominancy of Festuca arundinacea, Eragrostis curvula, Lespedeza bicolor, Miscanthus sinensis, Pinus densiflora, Festuca arundinacea, Festuca rubra, Artemisia princeps var. orientalis, Erigeron annuus, Lespedeza cuneata, Dactylis glomerata, Salix koreensis, Alnus hirsuta, Pueraria thunbergiana, Medicago sativa, Lactuca indica var. laciniata, and Digitaria sanguinalis were 13.41% 11.87%, 4.88%, 4.56%, 3.38%, 2.29%, 2.14%, 2.14%, 1.99%, 1.95%, 1.54%, 1.47%, 1.44%, 1.37%, 1.15%, 1.13%, 1.07% in the roadside cutting-slope, respectively. The dominancy of Rhododendron mucronulatum, Lindera obtusiloba, Rhus trichocarpa, Quercus mongolica, Lespedeza bicolor, Rhododendron schlippenbachii, and Quercus serrata 22.15%, 13.36%, 13.14%, 12.03%, 11.74%, 11.20%, and 11.14% in shrub layer of the upper forest area, respectively. The species of Rhododendron mucronulatum, Lindera obtusiloba, Rhus trichocarpa, Rhododendron schlippenbachii, Zanthoxylum schinifolium, Weigela subsessilis, Stephanandra incisa, Rhamnus davurica, Ligustrum obtusifolium, Lindera erythrocarpa, Rosa multiflora, Rubus coreanus, Symplocos chinensis for. pilosa, Smilax china, Prunus sargentii, and Staphylea bumalda may be more helpful in stabilizing of the cutting-slope area and making harmony with the surrounding forest area.

Distribution of riparian vegetation in Ian Stream (이안천의 식생분포)

  • Kim, Ho-Joon;Lee, Hye-Keun;Choi, Kwang-Soon
    • Proceedings of the Korea Water Resources Association Conference
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    • pp.1274-1279
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    • 2005
  • The complex vegetation and plant species distributions within riparian corridors influence plant species diversity patterns at both local and regional scales and further reflect both natural and anthropogenic disturbances. Because of these characteristics, riparian zones are often the ecosystem level component that are most sensitive to changes of the surrounding environment; they provide early indications of environmental change and can be viewed as the important source in the watershed. The objectives of this study were two concepts: first, document the composition and dominance of plant communities of riparian areas in the stream, second, compare species composition and temporal diversity between stations in riparian areas of the Ian Stream. The flora was composed to total 158 kinds of the vascular plants as 49 family, 54 genera, 145 species, 12 varieties, 1 forma When the naturalized plant were applied to the recent classification system 280 kinds, the naturalization rate was $10.8\% higher than that of mean value($10.3\%$) of the Korean mountain district. Furthermore, urbanization index (UI) was $6.1\%$. The dominant vegetation communities were distributed in the habitats of three compartments from upstream to downstream. The vegetations were included Phragmites japonica, Salix gracilistyla, S. hulteni and Robinia pseudo-acacia in the riparian area, and Persicaria sieboldii, Stellaria alsine var. undulata, Draba nemorosa var. hebecarpa, Capsella bursa-pastoris, Lepidium apetalum, Bidens frondosa, Trigonotis peduncularis and Hemistepta lyrata in the sandbank or the riparian area, and Equisetum arvense, Humulus japonicus, Persicaria perfoliata, Trifolium repens, Artemisia princeps var. orientalis, Lactuca indica var. laciniata, Avena fatua, Agropyron yesoense, Oenothera odorata, Viola mandshurica, Rumex crispus in banksides, respectively.

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In vitro Antioxidant and Anti-inflammatory Effects of Ethanol Extracts from Sprout of Evening Primrose (Oenothera laciniata) and Gooseberry (Actinidia arguta) (달맞이순과 다래순 에탄올 추출물의 in vitro 항산화효과 및 항염증효과)

  • Kwak, Chung Shil;Lee, Ji Hyun
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Food Science and Nutrition
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    • v.43 no.2
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    • pp.207-215
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    • 2014
  • To investigate the biological benefits of Korean traditional vegetables, anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects of ethanol extracts from blanched and dried sprouts of evening primrose (Oenothera laciniata, OL) and gooseberry (Actinidia arguta, AA) were measured. Total polyphenol and flavonoid contents of OL were higher than those of AA; OL contained 60.4 mg tannic acid/g dry weight and 31.9 mg rutin/g dry weight, while AA contained 33.0 mg tannic acid/g dry weight and 20.3 mg rutin/g dry weight. The $IC_{50}$ value for DPPH radical scavenging activity was $58.2{\mu}g/mL$ for OL ethanol extract and $122.1{\mu}g/mL$ for AA ethanol extract. The reducing power upon $500{\mu}g/mL$ of ethanol extract treatment was as strong as $52.1{\mu}g$ ascorbate eq./mL for OL and $45.3{\mu}g$ ascorbate eq./mL for AA. Regarding anti-inflammatory effects, inhibition rate against 5-lipoxygenase (LOX) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 activities were 29.5% and 79.5% for OL, as well as 11.5% and 39.1% for AA, respectively at a concentration of $250{\mu}g/mL$. Lipopolysaccaride ($1{\mu}g/mL$)-treated RAW 264.7 macrophage cells subjected to OL ethanol extract at various concentrations ($0{\sim}25{\mu}g/mL$) showed significantly reduced synthesis of nitrite oxide (NO), prostaglandin (PG) E2, and IL-6 in a dose-dependent manner without cytotoxicity, although TNF-${\alpha}$ synthesis was not affected. In conclusion, both OL and AA sprouts showed strong antioxidative activity, whereas OL showed very strong anti-inflammatory activity via effective reduction of NO, PGE2, and IL-6 synthesis in LPS-activated macrophage cells.

A Study on the Distribution Status and Management Measures of Naturalized Plants Growing in Seongeup Folk Village, Jeju Island (제주 성읍민속마을의 귀화식물 분포현황 및 관리방안)

  • Rho, Jae-Hyun;Oh, Hyun-Kyung;Han, Yun-Hee;Choi, Yung-Hyun;Byun, Mu-Sup;Kim, Young-Suk;Lee, Won-Ho
    • Journal of Korean Institute of Traditional Landscape Architecture
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    • v.32 no.1
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    • pp.107-119
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    • 2014
  • The purpose of this study is to examine the current status of vascular plants and naturalized plants growing in the Seongeup Folk Village in Jeju and to consider and compare their distribution patterns and the characteristics of emergence of naturalized plants in other folk villages and all parts of Jeju, thereby exploring measures to well manage naturalized plants. The result of this study is as follows.11) The total number of vascular plants growing in Seongeup Folk Village is identified to be 354 taxa which include 93 families, 260 genus, 298 species, 44 varieties and 12 breeds. Among them, the number of naturalized plants is 55 taxa in total including 22 families, 46 genus, 53 species, and 2 varieties, which accounts for 21.7% of the total of 254 taxa identified all over the region of Jeju. The rate of naturalization in Seongeup Folk Village is 15.5%, which is far higher than the rates of plant naturalization in Hahoi Village in Andong, Yangdong Village in Gyeongju, Hangae Village in Seongju, Wanggok Village in Goseong, and Oeam Village in Asan. Among the naturalized plants identified within the targeted villages, the number of those growing in Jeju is 9 taxa including Silene gallica, Modiola caroliniana, Oenothera laciniata, Oenothera stricta, Apium leptophyllum, Gnaphalium purpureum, Gnaphalium calviceps, Paspalum dilatatum and Sisyrinchium angustifolium. It is suggested that appropriate management measures that consider the characteristics of the gateway to import and the birthplace of the naturalized plants are necessary. In the meantime, 3 more taxa that have not been included in the reference list of Jeju have been identified for the first time in Seongeup Folk Village, which include Bromus sterilis, Cannabis sativa and Veronica hederaefolia. The number of naturalized plants identified within the gardens of unit-based cultural properties is 20 taxa, among which the rate of prevalence of Cerastium glomeratum is the highest at 62.5%. On the other hand, the communities of plants that require landscape management are Brassica napus and other naturalized plants, including Cosmos bipinnatus, Trifolium repens, Medicago lupulina, Oenothera stricta, O. laciniata, Lotus corniculatus, Lolium perenne, Silene gallica, Hypochaeris radicata, Plantago virginica, Bromus catharticus and Cerastium glomeratum. As a short-term measure to manage naturalized plants growing in Seongeup Folk Village, it is important to identify the current status of Cosmos bipinnatus and Brassica napus that have been planted for landscape agriculture, and explore how to use flowers during the blooming season. It is suggested that Ambrosia artemisiifolia and Hypochaeris radicata, designated as invasive alien plants by the Ministry of Health and Welfare, should be eradicated initially, followed by regular monitoring in case of further invasion, spread or expansion. As for Hypochaeris radicata, in particular, some physical prevention measures need to be explored, such as for example, identifying the habitat density and eradication of the plant. In addition, it is urgent to remove plants, such as Sonchus oleraceus, Houttuynia cordata, Crassocephalum crepidioides, Erigeron annuus and Lamium purpureum with high index of greenness visually, growing wild at around high Jeongyi town walls. At the same time, as the distribution and dominance value of the naturalized plants growing in deserted or empty houses are high, it is necessary to find measures to preserve and manage them and to use the houses as lodging places.

Vegetation Structure and Succession of Highway Cutting-slope Area (고속도로 절토비탈면의 식생구조와 천이)

  • Song, Hokyung;Jeon, Giseong;Lee, Sanghwa;Kim, Namchoon;Park, Gwansoo;Lee, Byungjun
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Environmental Restoration Technology
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    • v.8 no.6
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    • pp.69-79
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    • 2005
  • This study was carried out to select proper species for early stage replantation in highway cut-slope area. In highway cut-slope area, sample plots of 106 were selected, and their vegetations and environmental factors were investigated. 1. We found total 172 species in the 106 cutting area of highway. The species of high frequency of highway cut-slope were found in the order of Lespedeza bicolor, Artemisia princeps var. orientalis, Festuca arundinacea, Erigeron annuus, Lespedeza cuneata, Lactuca indica var. laciniata, Eragrostis curvula, Dactylis glomerata, Oenothera lamarckiana, Wistaria floribunda, Humulus japonica, Commelina communis, Miscanthus sinensis, Pueraria thunbergiana, Pinus densiflora, etc. 2. The average vegetation coverage was over 90% in the study sites and the average coverage was 91.4% in the total cut-slope area. The species of high coverage of highway cut-slope area were found in the order of Festuca arundinacea, Eragrostis curvula, Lespedeza bicolor, Wistaria floribunda, Lespedeza cuneata, Dactylis glomerata, Artemisia princeps var. orientalis, Humulus japonica, Pueraria thunbergiana, Robinia pseudoacacia, Poa pratensis, Medicago sativa, Festuca ovina, Pinus densiflora, Parthenocissua tricuspidata, etc. 3. The total coverage in the foreign plants of Festuca arundinacea, Eragrostis curvula, Dactylis glomerata, Poa pratensis, Medicago sativa, Coreopsis drummondii and native plants of Lespedeza bicolor, Wistaria floribunda, Lespedeza cuneata, Amorpha fruticosa, Indigofera pseudotinctoria, Lespedeza cyrtobotrya were 57.52%. That is, the ecological succession of native herbs and parachute shrubs have delayed because the afforested plants occupy 57.52%. In future, the coverage of foreign herbs have to reduce, and the coverage of the native herbs and parachute shrubs must be increased. 4. The native seed of Artemisia sp., Miscanthus sinensis, Smilax china, Pueraria thunbergiana, Rubus crataegifolius, Rubus parvifolius, Pinus densiflora, Rhus chinensis, Albizzia julibrissin, Rhododendron mucronulatum, Clematis apiifolia, Zanthoxylum schinifolium, Prunus sargentii could be added in the seedling of the temperate south zone highway with the used seeds. The native seed of Artemisia sp., Miscanthus sinensis, Rubus crataegifolius, Rhododendron mucronulatum, Weigela subsessilis, Stephanandra incisa, Rhus chinensis, Pinus densiflora, Salix koreensis, Cocculus trilobus, Populus alba, Spiraea prunifolia for. simpliciflora, Clematis apiifolia, Lindera obtusiloba, Quercus serrata, etc., could be added in the seedling of the temperate middle zone highway with the used seeds. 5. We have some recommendation. The native plants have to growth in the highway cut-slope area instead of foreign plants to have good environmental ecology. The role of the foreign plants should be the plant for the initial several years in the highway cut-slope area. And, the native plants should growth in the next season. 6. We should protect shrubs and trees in the highway slope area because shrubs and trees can be more helpful in stabilizing of the slope area than herbs.