• Title/Summary/Keyword: Osteomyelitis

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An infant with a palatal fistula secondary to Candida infection

  • Sharma, Sarwpriya;Chauhan, Jaideep Singh
    • Archives of Craniofacial Surgery
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    • v.21 no.3
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    • pp.206-209
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    • 2020
  • Candida osteomyelitis affecting maxillofacial bones has been scantly documented in the literature. Infantile osteomyelitis is an uncommon and life-threatening disease. Candida osteomyelitis causes significant morbidity. The present report describes a case of a 9-month-old infant with infantile osteomyelitis secondary to candida infection. This report describes its presentation and the management of palatal fistula in an infant.

Treatment of osteomyelitis in the rear area of the lingula of the mandible using sagittal split ramus osteotomy: a case report

  • Jung, Tae-Young
    • Journal of the Korean Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons
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    • v.41 no.4
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    • pp.203-207
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    • 2015
  • Osteomyelitis is classified into three groups according to its origin: osteomyelitis that originates from the blood supply, osteomyelitis related to bone disease or vascular disease, and osteomyelitis related to a local infection of dental or non-dental origin. The present case involved osteomyelitis related to a local infection of dental origin and was located in the rear area of the lingula of the mandible. We decided to use sagittal split ramus osteotomy to access the osteomyelitis area. Under general anesthesia, we successfully performed surgical sequestrectomy and curettage via sagittal split ramus osteotomy.

Chronic suppuraive osteomyelitis of the mandible caused by periodontal disease;a case report (치주질환으로 인해 유발된 하악의 만성 화농성 골수염의 치험 일례)

  • Lim, Yo-Han;Pyo, Sung-Woon;Han, Eun-Young
    • Journal of Periodontal and Implant Science
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    • v.32 no.4
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    • pp.745-752
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    • 2002
  • Osteomyelitis is an exhaustive disease whose main feature is an inflammation of inner part of bone, bone marrow. In oral and maxillofacial area, we have maxillary and mandibular osteomyelitis and the latter is dominant because of its impaired blood supply. The main cause of osteomyelitis is a bacterial infection and the ways of infections are by periapical odontogenic infection, fracture, post-operative complication, and periodontal disease. The predominant etiologic factor is periapical odontogenic infection mostly caused by advanced dental caries. It is generally believed that periodontal disease could be a cause of osteomyelitis. But periodontal disease is usually confined to the alveolar bone area and not extends to the underlying bone marrow. Accordingly periodontal infection per se rarely cause produce oseomyelitis. Even though osteomyeltis could be occurred by periodontal disease, its virulence of infection is milder than periapical odontogenic infection. So it usually provokes sclerosing or hyperplastic osteomyelitis rather than suppurative type. We had a case of suppurative osteomyelitis caused by periodontal disease and treated it with periodontal and oral and maxillofacial surgical method.

Acute Osteomyelitis in the Proximal Humerus Caused by Pyogenic Glenohumeral Arthritis in an Elderly Patient - A Case Report

  • Hyun, Yoon-Suk;Kwon, Jae-Woo;Hong, Sung-Yup;Han, Kyeol
    • Clinics in Shoulder and Elbow
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    • v.17 no.4
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    • pp.197-200
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    • 2014
  • Reports of osteomyelitis in the proximal humerus with pyogenic glenohumeral arthritis of adjacent joints mostly involve pediatric patients. Nowadays, osteomyelitis that is secondary to adjacent pyogenic glenohumeral arthritis is extremely rare, even more so in adults than in pediatrics. We report a rare case of the pyogenic glenohumeral arthritis followed by osteomyelitis of the proximal humerus in an elderly patient. Initially, we diagnosed a case of pyogenic glenohumeral arthritis only, which, despite arthroscopic synovectomy, did not resolve and severe pain continued. Subsequent radiological imaging, performed after our suspicion of a secondary involvement, allowed us to diagnose osteomyelitis combined with the pyogenic glenohumeral arthritis, which we had overlooked because of the extreme rarity of the condition in adults since the antibiotic era began.

Mycobacterium abscessus Osteomyelitis in the Mid Foot (중족부에 발생한 Mycobacterium abscessus 골수염)

  • Chun, Kyung-Ah;Kwak, Yee-Gyung;Suh, Jin-Soo
    • Journal of Korean Foot and Ankle Society
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    • v.15 no.1
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    • pp.39-43
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    • 2011
  • Non-tuberculous mycobacterium has a wide-spread occurrence in nature, and skin, soft tissue, bone, lung and disseminated infection can be involved. Non-tuberculous mycobacterium infection occurs both in immunocompetent patients without underlying diseases and in immunocompromised hosts. Non-tuberculous mycobactrial osteomyelitis is a rare cause of granulomatous osteomyelitis, and has been previously reported in the sternum, spine, humerus, femur, tibia or metatarsal. Mycobacterium abscessus osteomyelitis is a very rare infection in the foot and only 1 case has been reported. Authors report a case of Mycobacterium abscessus osteomyelitis involving the tarsal and metatarsal bones in a non-immunocompromized middle aged women.

Early Diagnosis of Acute Osteomyelitis by TC-99m Pyrophosphate Bone Imaging (Tc-99m Pyrophosphate-골(骨)스캔에 의한 급성골수염(急性骨髓炎)의 조기진단(早期診斷))

  • Kim, Choon-Yul;Bahk, Yong-Whee
    • The Korean Journal of Nuclear Medicine
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    • v.13 no.1_2
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    • pp.55-60
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    • 1979
  • The radiographic diagnosis of osteomyelitis can be suspected early with deep soft tissue swelling, but the actual bone changes of osteomyelitis may be delayed as long as 10 to 14 days after onset or may be totally aborted by antibiotic therapy. Recognition of osteomyelitis by bone imaging is far more rapid than by conventional radiographic examination and can be used on admission to establish the diagnosis. Ten patients suspected of having early, acute osteomyelitis were studied by TC-99m Pyrophosphate bone imaging. Radiographs taken at the same time were all negative. Of these 9 patients showed positive bone images. The bone imaging provides a safe, accurate, noninvasive technique for the early diagnosis of osteomyelitis.

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Primary Sternal Osteomyelitis Caused by Actinomyces israelii

  • Lee, Jun Ho;Jeon, Seok Chol;Jang, Hyo-Jun;Kim, Hyuck;Kim, Young Hak;Chung, Won-Sang
    • Journal of Chest Surgery
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    • v.48 no.1
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    • pp.86-89
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    • 2015
  • Primary sternal osteomyelitis is a rare disease. Common infectious organisms causing primary sternal osteomyelitis include Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Actinomyces species are common saprophytes of the oral cavity, but there have been few reports in the literature of primary sternal osteomyelitis caused by Actinomyces species. We describe a case of primary sternal osteomyelitis caused by Actinomyces israelii without pulmonary involvement.

Chronic suppurative osteomyelitis with proliferative periostitis related to a fully impacted third molar germ: a report of two cases

  • Park, Joonhyoung;Myoung, Hoon
    • Journal of the Korean Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons
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    • v.42 no.4
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    • pp.215-220
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    • 2016
  • In prolonged chronic osteomyelitis, chronic inflammation and low-grade infections can result in new periosteal bone formation. Chronic osteomyelitis with proliferative periostitis (traditionally termed $Garr{\acute{e}^{\prime}s$ sclerosing osteomyelitis) mainly affects children and young adults. Here, we present two rare cases of an 11-year-old and a 12-year-old patient with suppurative chronic osteomyelitis with proliferative periostitis without any definitive infection source, such as dental caries or periodontitis. The source of infection was likely to be related to the development of a lower right third molar germ with follicular space widening. Management involved antibiotics and the removal of the third molar germ and surgical debridement. Disease remission and a normal appearance was observed at the six-month follow-up visit.

Clinical Analysis of the Conservative Treatment for Diabetic Foot Osteomyelitis (당뇨병성 족부 골수염 치료에서 보존적 치료에 대한 임상적 고찰)

  • Kim, Yong-Beom;Lee, Eun Jung;Cho, Jaeho;Kwon, Min-Soo;Kang, Seung-Gu;Chun, Dong-Il
    • Journal of Korean Foot and Ankle Society
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    • v.19 no.3
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    • pp.107-113
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    • 2015
  • Purpose: The question of surgical versus non-surgical treatment for diabetic foot osteomyelitis remains subject to debate. The aims of this study were to analyse the outcome of conservative treatment (antibiotic treatment and conservative surgery) for diabetic foot osteomyelitis and identify the predictive factors of remission in conservative treatment of diabetic foot osteomyelitis. Materials and Methods: Seventy-seven patients with diabetic foot osteomyelitis who initially received conservative treatment from January 2004 to July 2013 were identified, and their medical records were reviewed. Diabetic foot osteomyelitis was defined by imaging studies or histological evidence. Remission was defined as the absence of any sign of infection at the initial or contiguous site assessed at least 12 months after the end of treatment. The demographic, clinical, and therapeutic factors were analysed. Results: The mean age of the patients was $62.7{\pm}12.2$ years, and 47 patients (61.0%) were male. The median diabetes duration was $15.7{\pm}11.2$ years and mean HbA1c was $8.7%{\pm}2.4%$. Forty-eight patients (62.3%) healed with conservative treatment (antibiotic treatment and conservative surgery). Twenty-five patients (32.5%) underwent amputation. In the multivariate analysis, concomitant peripheral artery disease and inadequate antibiotic therapy were associated with failure of conservative treatment. Conclusion: Antibiotics alone, or with conservative surgery, were successful in treatment of diabetic foot osteomyelitis in 62.3% of the patients. Concomitant peripheral artery disease and inadequate antimicrobial therapy were risk factors for remission in conservatively treated diabetic foot osteomyelitis.

[ $GARR{\grave{e}}'s$ ] OSTEOMYELITIS IN CHILDREN (어린이의 악골에 발생한 $Garr{\grave{e}}'s$ osteomyelitis)

  • Kim, Shin;Jeong, Tae-Sung;Kim, Hong-Ryoul
    • JOURNAL OF THE KOREAN ACADEMY OF PEDTATRIC DENTISTRY
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    • v.25 no.3
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    • pp.533-538
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    • 1998
  • [ $Garr{\grave{e}}'s$ ] osteomyelitis is a chronic form of osteomyelitis in which periosteum is thickened with peripheral reactive bone formation. Carl $Garr{\grave{e}}$ first reported localized periosteal thickening as a response to mild stimuli. In dental literatures, Pell et al. first reported $Garr{\grave{e}}'s$ osteomyelitis in jaws. This disease frequent occurs in youngsters and usually in mandible. It usually results in hard swelling over the jaws with little or no pain. Palpation reveals a localized bony swelling lesion. In radiographic findings, it usually reveals laminated periosteal thickening on lesion. The treatment of $Garr{\grave{e}}'s$ osteomyelitis usually consists of elimination of the sources of infection, i.e., either extraction of an infected teeth or root canal therapy. Two children were admitted with the chief complaint of intraoral swelling on lower deciduous molar areas which was diagnosed as $Garr{\grave{e}}'s$ osteomyelitis. The root canal therapy and antibiotic therapy were performed and prognosis was checked. From these case studies, some results were obtained as follows : With the aid of root canal therapy and antibiotic administration, the size of periapical lesions was reduced, the mandible with bony swelling recovered its normal shapes radiographically, and the permanent tooth germs resumed sound development.

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