• Title, Summary, Keyword: Polyherbal Supplement

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Influence of Dietary Phytoadditive as Polyherbal Combination on Performance of Does and Respective Litters in Cross Bred Dairy Goats

  • Mirzaei, F.;Prasad, S.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.24 no.10
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    • pp.1386-1392
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    • 2011
  • The aim of the present work was to study the effects of a polyherbal supplement on cross bred does, starting from the last month of pregnancy to weaning, on milk yield, kid birth weight and growth rate. Thirty does were divided into three treatments of ten each in individual pens: low level supplementation (LS), high level supplementation (HS) and non-supplemented treatment (NS) as control. Low supplemented goats were given 125 mg/kg BW/d of polyherbal combination; high supplemented goats were given 250 mg/kg BW/d. The study was carried out in 2008. Fifty-nine kids were born from all the experimental animals. There was no difference on milk yield between supplemented groups and control (p>0.05), although polyherbal supplementation had positive effect on litter birth weight and growth rate compared to control. Weaning weights were higher (p<0.001) in LS and HS compared to NS does. In both supplemented treatments compared to control, mortalities and morbidities were also lower in kids born. It is concluded that pre-partum to weaning supplementation increases kids growth rates and weaning weights, as well as reduces kid mortalities, but it doesn't have significant effect on milk production.

Effect of Polyherbal Feed Supplement "Growell" during Induced Aflatoxicosis, Ochratoxicosis and Combined Mycotoxicoses in Broilers

  • Kalorey, D.R.;Kurkure, N.V.;Ramgaonkar, J.S.;Sakhare, P.S.;Warke, Shubhangi;Nigot, N.K.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.18 no.3
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    • pp.375-383
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    • 2005
  • An experiment was conducted to study the protective role of polyherbal feed supplement (Growell) during induced mycotoxicosis in broilers. A total of 240 Vencobb broilers were divided at day old stage into eight equal groups. Group A served as control and was given plain feed, group B, D, F and H were given Growell at 0.35 g/kg of feed. Group C, D, G and H were given dietary aflatoxin $B_1$ at 0.2 ppm and groups E, F, G and H were given ochratoxin A at 0.2 ppm in feed to study effect of Growell on individual aflatoxicosis, ochratoxicosis and combined mycotoxicosis of broilers. The chicks were given their respective feeds from 1st day to 6th week of age and were vaccinated at 7th and 28th day of age with Lasota strain of Newcastle disease virus. There was no statistically significant effect of mycotoxins individually or in combination on body weight of broilers. However, body weights were highest in group B and lowest in co-mycotoxicated group G. Feed conversion ratio was best in group B followed by A, D, F, E, H and G. Significant improvement in haemoglobin values was observed in broilers due to feeding of Growell in ochratoxin and co-mycotoxicated groups. There was no significant effect of mycotoxin treatment on PCV, TEC and TLC of broilers. Due to single and combined mycotoxicosis, there was reduction in serum total protein, albumin, cholesterol and triglyceride and rise in alkaline phosphatase, creatinine and uric acid levels. Supplementation of diets with Growell reduced the alterations induced due to mycotoxins. There was a significant rise in per cent organ weight of liver and reduction of that of spleen, bursa of Fabricius and thymus of broilers fed mycotoxins. Protection from alteration in per cent organ weight of these organ by supplementation of Growell was recorded. The observed impaired immune response and histopathological changes in liver, kidney, spleen, bursa of Fabricius and thymus of broilers given mycotoxins were protected by supplementation of Growell.