• Title, Summary, Keyword: Requirements

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A Comparative Study between LSI and LDA in Constructing Traceability between Functional and Non-Functional Requirements

  • Byun, Sung-Hoon;Lee, Seok-Won
    • Journal of the Korea Society of Computer and Information
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    • v.24 no.7
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    • pp.19-29
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    • 2019
  • Requirements traceability is regarded as one of the important quality attributes in software requirements engineering field. If requirements traceability is guaranteed then we can trace the requirements' life throughout all the phases, from the customers' needs in the early stage of the project to requirements specification, deployment, and maintenance phase. This includes not only tracking the development artifacts that accompany the requirements, but also tracking backwards from the development artifacts to the initial customer requirements associated with them. In this paper, especially, we dealt with the traceability between functional requirements and non-functional requirements. Among many Information Retrieval (IR) techniques, we decided to utilize Latent Semantic Indexing (LSI) and Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) in our research. Ultimately, we conducted an experiment on constructing traceability by using two techniques and analyzed the experiment results. And then we provided a comparative study between two IR techniques in constructing traceability between functional requirements and non-functional requirements.

A Model for Reusing Requirements Using Examples from Open Source Software

  • Kim, Jong-Bae
    • Journal of information and communication convergence engineering
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    • v.10 no.3
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    • pp.284-294
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    • 2012
  • The quality of requirements is one of the key factors in the success of a project. One of the studies on successful projects is the reuse of requirements. However, the rate of failed projects is about 70%, and these projects often fail because of improper requirements. The current techniques for software reuse may not perform requirement engineering appropriately or develop requirements having good characteristics. In order to improve this situation, we propose a model for reusing requirements. We expect that our model will contribute toward increasing project productivity using requirement reuse in existing projects, and reusing requirements that have good quality.

A SysML Based Approach for identifying and specifying Non-Functional Requirements (SysML을 이용한 비기능 요구사항 정의 방법)

  • Kim, Jeen Wook
    • Journal of the Korea Society of Systems Engineering
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    • v.6 no.2
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    • pp.37-45
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    • 2010
  • Requirements engineering is an important phase in a system's life cycle. It is important to perform it correctly. The increasing complexity of systems makes requirements engineering activities more difficult. Non-functional requirements are drivers to emerge how much emergent system properties to aim for success. All functional requirements may be satifsfied, but if the level of desired non-functional requirements are overlooked, the system development will fail. There is growing awareness of the importance of defining non-functional requirements early in the process among the requirements engineering (RE) community. This paper propses a SysML based approach for non-functional requirements to identify and specify very early in the process or requirements engineering.

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Design Requirements in Software and Engineering Systems

  • Eleiche, A.M.;Ahmad, I.;Elish, M.O.
    • Industrial Engineering and Management Systems
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    • v.11 no.1
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    • pp.70-81
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    • 2012
  • The subject of "Design Requirements" (DR) is central to the design of software and engineering systems. The main reason for this is that quality aspects are usually closely tied to requirements, among other things. In this review paper, we consider how the subject of requirements is being managed in these two seemingly different design disciplines. Two important aspects are covered, namely: (a) requirements development, describing various activities leading to requirements documentation, and (b) requirements change management, describing various activities needed for the proper treatment of the inevitable changes in requirements. Similarities and differences on how these two aspects are handled in software and engineering systems are highlighted. It is concluded from this literature survey that the management of software requirements is quite coherent and well established as a science. On the other hand, management of engineering systems requirements suffer from being unstructured, in particular when requirements changes are involved. Important gaps and future important research areas are identified.

A Requirements Management Process to improve the Requirements Management of Development Methodologies (개발방법론의 요구사항 관리를 개선하기 위한 요구사항 관리 프로세스)

  • Sin, Jong-Cheol;Gu, Yeon-Seol
    • The KIPS Transactions:PartD
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    • v.9D no.1
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    • pp.81-90
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    • 2002
  • More than 50% of defects and errors in the software development projects are related to the requirements[14]. But the development methodologies can not provide enough supports to the requirements management and changes. In the real world, the requirements keep changing as the requirements at the early development phase are usually incomplete, the developer′s understanding of the problem will be constantly changed during the software process, and new requirements may emerge with the organizational and environmental changes. In this paper, a requirements management process that can be integrated into the development methodologies is proposed to extend the requirements management over the whole development life-cycle and to support the requirements changes at the design/implementation/test phases. To evaluate the proposed process, it was compared to the existing requirements managements processes and models, and examined through a integration test with a widely used development methodology "MaRMI" to show the expected improvements at each development phase.

Communication-Centered Project Management for Requirements Definition Phase

  • Ishii, Nobuaki;Muraki, Masaaki
    • Industrial Engineering and Management Systems
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    • v.11 no.1
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    • pp.39-47
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    • 2012
  • Requirements definition, which determines a project baseline, has a strong impact on the success of a project. However, since in-depth requirements are gradually revealed through the requirements definition process, the requirements definition is not a straight forward process and often falls into disorder. Thus project management standpoints are critical for the success of the requirements definition. In this paper, we present a framework and mechanisms of communication-centered project management, which controls the requirements definition process based on the situation of communication-oriented activities among stakeholders. In addition, we present a communication-centered project plan with a planning method. The project plan, which represents a time schedule of requirements definition activities, is made by a simulation-optimization algorithm using a stakeholder matrix showing the relations of requirements domains and relevant stakeholders. The effectiveness and the significance of communication-centered project management at the requirements definition phase are demonstrated by numerical examples.

An Advanced User-Construction Requirement Within the EFD for the Development of Large-scale Information Systems

  • Park, Won-Seok;Park, Man-Gon
    • Journal of Korea Multimedia Society
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    • v.6 no.4
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    • pp.723-735
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    • 2003
  • This research focuses ell an approach for the building of a requirements model for the development of large-scale information systems. It will suggest a set of requirements engineering processes as a procedure of the implementation for building the requirements model. It will also emphasise the evaluation requirements model aimed to refine and complete the requirements model by the different user groups as a cross reference. This paper provides an advanced user-construction requirements within the Event Flow Diagram as a set of requirements engineering process.

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A Quantitative Approach to Requirements Analysis for Architectures Modeling (아키텍처 모델링을 위한 요구사항 정량화 기법)

  • Kim Jintae;Yang Wonseok;Jang Changhae;Park Sooyong
    • Journal of KIISE:Software and Applications
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    • v.33 no.1
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    • pp.58-68
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    • 2006
  • Requirements are very important to model software architecture. Requirements are divided into functional and quality requirements. Functional requirements are pinpointed subsystems and components. Quality requirements affect the structure of architecture. Thus requirements are essential to understand clearly in order to design software architecture. This paper focuses on a quantitative approach to requirements analysis for modeling architectures. In our proposal, functional requirements are quantified through calculating each priority of components. Quality requirements are quantified through calculating the correlation degree between components and quality attributes. The proposed method is implemented by DRAMA (Domain Requirements Analysis for Modeling Architectures), which fully supports our approach and are developed in Java environments. Our proposal is validated to apply some industrial examples.

A Collaborative Requirements Elicitation Model For Crowdsourcing Platforms

  • Mukundwa, Chantal;Lee, Seok-Won
    • Journal of the Korea Society of Computer and Information
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    • v.24 no.3
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    • pp.95-104
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    • 2019
  • Crowdsourcing is growing its interests in designing where various designers work independently to a given design task. Recent researchers discovered that collaboration by sharing designs among designers helps to produce high-quality designs. However, design task may still be hard even with that collaboration in case the requirements are not well-defined. Most customers sometimes do not know what they really want and do not know how to clearly define the requirements. Consequently, the lack of requirements creates issues on designers, such as spending much time and effort on collecting requirements alone or from the customers. The designers even end up missing important necessities to complete their tasks. To address this issue, we proposed a collaborative requirements elicitation method that supports designers who are working on the same task. We developed CREFD (Collaborative Requirements Elicitation For Designers and Developers) tool to enable designers collaboratively provide requirements, identify dependencies, add annotations and votes to the provided requirements. We performed the hypothetical and empirical evaluations to test and compare the proposed method with one of the existing elicitation methods, the results show that the proposed method helps in collecting accepted and well-organized requirements better than individual requirements elicitation.

Stakeholders Driven Requirements Engineering Approach for Data Warehouse Development

  • Kumar, Manoj;Gosain, Anjana;Singh, Yogesh
    • Journal of Information Processing Systems
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    • v.6 no.3
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    • pp.385-402
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    • 2010
  • Most of the data warehouse (DW) requirements engineering approaches have not distinguished the early requirements engineering phase from the late requirements engineering phase. There are very few approaches seen in the literature that explicitly model the early & late requirements for a DW. In this paper, we propose an AGDI (Agent-Goal-Decision-Information) model to support the early and late requirements for the development of DWs. Here, the notion of agent refers to the stakeholders of the organization and the dependency among agents refers to the dependencies among stakeholders for fulfilling their organizational goals. The proposed AGDI model also supports three interrelated modeling activities namely, organization modeling, decision modeling and information modeling. Here, early requirements are modeled by performing organization modeling and decision modeling activities, whereas late requirements are modeled by performing information modeling activities. The proposed approach has been illustrated to capture the early and late requirements for the development of a university data warehouse exemplifying our model's ability of supporting its decisional goals by providing decisional information.