• Title, Summary, Keyword: Skin Tissue

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Elevated Aurora Kinase A Protein Expression in Diabetic Skin Tissue

  • Cho, Moon Kyun;An, Je Min;Kim, Chul Han;Kang, Sang Gue
    • Archives of Plastic Surgery
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    • v.41 no.1
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    • pp.35-39
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    • 2014
  • Background Aurora kinase A (Aurora-A) plays an important role in the regulation of mitosis and cytokinesis. Dysregulated Aurora-A leads to mitotic faults and results in pathological conditions. No studies on Aurora-A expression in human diabetic skin tissue have been reported. In light of this, we explored the expression of Aurora-A in human diabetic skin tissue. Methods Aurora-A protein was evaluated by western blotting in 6 human diabetic skin tissue and 6 normal skin specimens. Results Increased expression of Aurora-A protein was detected in all diabetic skin tissue samples in both western blot analysis and immunohistochemical staining. However, in the case of the normal skin tissue, no bands of Aurora-A protein were detected in either the western blotting analysis or the immunohistochemical staining. Conclusions Thus far, there have been no studies on the expression of Aurora-A in diabetic skin tissue. However, we believe that oxidative DNA damage related to the expression of Aurora-A protein and Aurora-A could be involved inhuman diabetic skin tissue.

Expression of Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase Protein in Diabetes

  • Kim, Chul Han
    • Archives of Plastic Surgery
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    • v.40 no.5
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    • pp.517-521
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    • 2013
  • Background Diabetes is characterized by chronic hyperglycemia, which can increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The formation of ROS induces oxidative stress and activates oxidative damage-inducing genes in cells. No research has been published on oxidative damage-related extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) protein levels in human diabetic skin. We investigated the expression of EC-SOD in diabetic skin compared with normal skin tissue in vivo. Methods The expression of EC-SOD protein was evaluated by western blotting in 6 diabetic skin tissue samples and 6 normal skin samples. Immunohistochemical staining was also carried out to confirm the EC-SOD expression level in the 6 diabetic skin tissue samples. Results The western blotting showed significantly lower EC-SOD protein expression in the diabetic skin tissue than in the normal tissue. Immunohistochemical examination of EC-SOD protein expression supported the western blotting analysis. Conclusions Diabetic skin tissues express a relatively small amount of EC-SOD protein and may not be protected against oxidative stress. We believe that EC-SOD is related to the altered metabolic state in diabetic skin, which elevates ROS production.

Prestrain-induced Reduction in Skin Tissue Puncture Force of Microneedle (초기변형률에 의한 미소바늘의 피부조직 관통력 감소)

  • Kim, Jonghun;Park, Sungmin;Nam, Gyungmok;Yoon, Sang-Hee
    • Transactions of the Korean Society of Mechanical Engineers A
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    • v.40 no.10
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    • pp.851-856
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    • 2016
  • Despite all the recent advances in biodegradable material-based microneedles, the bending and failure (especially buckling) of a biodegradable microneedle during skin tissue insertion remains a major technical hurdle for its large-scale commercialization. A reduction in skin tissue puncture force during microneedle insertion remains an essential issue in successfully developing a biodegradable microneedle. Here, we consider uniaxial and equibiaxial prestrains applied to a skin tissue as mechanophysical stimuli that can reduce the skin tissue puncture force, and investigate the effect of prestrain on the changes in skin tissue puncture force. For a porcine skin tissue similar to that of humans, the skin tissue puncture force of a flat-end microneedle is measured with a z-axis stage equipped with a load cell, which provides a force-time curve during microneedle insertion. The findings of this study lead to a quantitative characterization of the relationship between prestrain and the skin tissue puncture force.

Effect of Skin Burn on the Skin and Liver (피부화상이 피부 및 간에 미치는 영향)

  • Nam, Chul-Hyun;Seo, Hyun-Gyu;Hwang, Tae-Yeun;Choi, Hyun-Lim;Lee, Dong-Ho
    • Journal of Korean Physical Therapy Science
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    • v.8 no.2
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    • pp.1091-1097
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    • 2001
  • The main experiments was investigated the skin tissue damage changing for the skin bum having influence on the skin and the liver and also observed the radical liver weight, ALT in the serum, the fluctuating of AST for the skin bum causing to the liver damage. Anatomically the edema formation of skin after thermal injury was showed, and skin bum increased liver weight (% of body weight, p<0.05) and the activity of serum aniline aminotrasferase (p<0.05), and also histologically induced wes of epidermal layer, protein degeneration of connective tissue, local hemorrhage and degeneration of glandular epithelium in the skin tissue. Liver tissue showed the evidences of postbum damage, they were sinusoidal dilatation, cell swelling, infiltration of inflammatory cells.

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Tumors Involving Skin, Soft Tissue and Skeletal Muscle: Benign, Primary Malignant or Metastatic?

  • Hsieh, Chi-Ying;Tsai, Huang-Wen;Chang, Chih-Chun;Lin, Tsuo-Wu;Chang, Ke-Chung;Chen, Yo-Shen
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.16 no.15
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    • pp.6681-6684
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    • 2015
  • Background: Metastatic cancer with invasion of skin, soft tissue and skeletal muscle is not common. Examples presenting as soft tissue masses could sometimes lead to misdiagnosis with delayed or inappropriate management. The purpose of current study was to investigate clinical characteristics in the involvement of metastatic cancer. Materials and Methods: A total of 1,097 patients complaining of skin or soft tissue masses and/or lesions were retrospectively reviewed from January 2012 to June 2013. Tumors involving skin, soft tissue and skeletal muscle of head and neck, chest wall, abdominal wall, pelvic region, back, upper and lower extremities were included in the study. Results: Fifty-seven (5.2%) patients were recognized as having malignancies on histopathological examination. The most common involvement of malignancy was basal cell carcinoma, followed by cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, sarcoma and melanoma. The most common anatomical location in skin and soft tissue malignancies was head and neck (52.6% of the malignancies). Four (0.36%) of the malignant group were identified as metastatic cancer with the primary cancer source from lung, liver and tonsil and the most common site was upper extremities. One of them unexpectedly expired during the operation of metastatic tumor excision at the scalp. Conclusions: Discrimination between benign and malignant soft tissue tumors is crucial. Performance of imaging study could assist in the differential diagnosis and the pre-operative risk evaluation of metastatic tumors involving skin, soft tissue and skeletal muscle.

Implementation of Radiation Damage in Vitro Model using Swine Skin (돼지피부를 사용한 방사선 체외 장해모델 구현연구)

  • Jung, Hongmoon;Won, Doyeon;Jeong, Dong Kyung;Jung, Jaeeun
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Radiology
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    • v.10 no.2
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    • pp.139-144
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    • 2016
  • The study of radiation-hazard in the human skin tissue is carried out by direct irradiating to experimental animals. The influences of a radiation to the animal's skin tissue are analyzed from this experiment. However, this also accompanies losses in terms of both time and economy. In this study, we simulated human tissue by using a swine skin tissue. The depth of the swine skin tissue for the experiment is determined, and the amount of the direct radiation below this skin depth is analyzed numerically. The amount of the radiation occurred by exposure below the skin tissue can be inferred. Moreover, it is possible to use only cells effectively and animal experiments to analyze the body-hazard by radiation.

Skin Permeation and Crosslinking with Biological Tissue of the Hydrolyzed Products of Gardeniae Fructus Extract (치자엑스 가수분해물 제제의 피부투과 및 생체 피부조직과의 교차결합에 관한 연구)

  • Yang, Jae-Heon;Lee, Nam-Hee
    • Journal of Pharmaceutical Investigation
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    • v.35 no.1
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    • pp.7-16
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    • 2005
  • Gardeniae Fructus is consisted of geniposide and it's derivatives. For the purpose of treatment of skin disease, geniposide and hydrolyzed products (HP) of Gardeniae Fructus were studied on skin permeation and cross1inking with biological tissue. The hydrolyzed products (HP) and active ingredients of Gardeniae Fructus were identified and investigated about skin permeability. Genipin has provided low cytotoxic cross1inking reagents and formed stable and biocompatible crosslinked products. The permeation enhancing effects of geniposide and genipin under the hydrolyzed products of cream and hydrogel preparations were tested using Franz type diffusion cell and the skin of hairless mouse. The remaining proportions of geniposide and genipin were measured in the hydrolyzed products of cream and hydrogel preparations. The crosslinking of epidermic and endodermic tissue with genipin under the hydrolyzed prodcuts of cream and hydrogel preparation was observed using light microscopy. Increased absorption ratio of the skin of hairless mouse about genipin was higher than that of geniposide. Loads at break, tensile strengths and skin permeation rate of the hydrolyzed products (HP) of cream and hydrogel preparations were higher than the nonhydrolyzed products (NHP). The hydrolyzed products (HP) of cream and hydrogel of Gardeniae Fructus Extracts were proper preparations and crosslinking agents to increase the transdermal absorption with epidermic and endodermic tissue.

Overexpression of KAI1 Protein in Diabetic Skin Tissues

  • Cho, Moon Kyun;Kwon, Sun Bum;Kim, Chul Han;Lee, Yoon-Jin;Nam, Hae-Seon;Lee, Sang-Han
    • Archives of Plastic Surgery
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    • v.41 no.3
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    • pp.248-252
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    • 2014
  • Background Patients with diabetes mellitus often have a difficult life, suffering from foot ulceration or amputation. Diabetes is characterized by chronic inflammation, and one of the features of inflammation is hypoxia. Recently, it has been reported that KAI1 is a hypoxia target gene. There is no published research on hypoxia-related KAI1 protein levels in human diabetic skin. Therefore, we have investigated the expression of KAI1 protein in diabetic skin tissue in vivo. Methods The expression of KAI1 protein was evaluated by western blotting in 6 diabetic skin tissue samples and 6 normal skin samples. Immunohistochemical staining was carried out to identify KAI1 expression. Results The western blotting revealed significantly increased expression of the KAI1 protein in diabetic skin tissues as compared to normal skin tissues. Immunohistochemical examination demonstrated that KAI1 was expressed in all diabetic skin tissues with moderate-to-strong positivity and weakly expressed in normal skin tissues. Conclusions Our data suggest that a high expression of the KAI1 protein can be observed in diabetic skin tissue. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report suggesting that KAI1 protein expression in diabetic skin tissues may be associated with chronic inflammatory states and hypoxia.

Full Thickness Skin Expansion ex vivo in a Newly Developed Reactor and Evaluation of Auto-Grafting Efficiency of the Expanded Skin Using Yucatan Pig Model

  • Huh, Man-Il;Yi, Soo-Jin;Lee, Kyung-Pil;Kim, Hong Kyun;An, Sang-Hyun;Kim, Dan-Bi;Ryu, Rae-Hyung;Kim, Jun-Sik;Lim, Jeong Ok
    • Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine
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    • v.15 no.5
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    • pp.629-638
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    • 2018
  • BACKGROUND: Skin grafts are required in numerous clinical procedures, such as reconstruction after skin removal and correction of contracture or scarring after severe skin loss caused by burns, accidents, and trauma. The current standard for skin defect replacement procedures is the use of autologous skin grafts. However, donor-site tissue availability remains a major obstacle for the successful replacement of skin defects and often limits this option. The aim of this study is to effectively expand full thickness skin to clinically useful size using an automated skin reactor and evaluate auto grafting efficiency of the expanded skin using Yucatan female pigs. METHODS: We developed an automated bioreactor system with the functions of real-time monitoring and remotecontrol, optimization of grip, and induction of skin porosity for effective tissue expansion. We evaluated the morphological, ultra-structural, and mechanical properties of the expanded skin before and after expansion using histology, immunohistochemistry, and tensile testing. We further carried out in vivo grafting study using Yucatan pigs to investigate the feasibility of this method in clinical application. RESULTS: The results showed an average expansion rate of 180%. The histological findings indicated that external expansion stimulated cellular activity in the isolated skin and resulted in successful grafting to the transplanted site. Specifically, hyperplasia did not appear at the auto-grafted site, and grafted skin appeared similar to normal skin. Furthermore, mechanical stimuli resulted in an increase in COL1A2 expression in a suitable environment. CONCLUSIONS: These findings provided insight on the potential of this expansion system in promoting dermal extracellular matrix synthesis in vitro. Conclusively, this newly developed smart skin bioreactor enabled effective skin expansion ex vivo and successful grafting in vivo in a pig model.

Hand Resurfacing with Full Thickness Skin Graft from the Palm Ulnar Border (손날 부위에서의 전층 피부이식을 이용한 수부 피복)

  • Song, Jung-Yoon;Eun, Seok-Chan;Baek, Rong-Min
    • Archives of Plastic Surgery
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    • v.38 no.5
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    • pp.649-654
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    • 2011
  • Purpose: Split-or full-thickness skin grafts are used to reconstruct palmar skin and soft tissue defects after trauma or to release burn scar contracture on the hand. Glabrous skin defects should be substituted with similar skin to preserve function and aesthetics. The authors report their experiences with a technique that uses a full-thickness graft taken from glabrous skin on the ulnar edge of the palm for the reconstruction of soft tissue defects of the hand. Methods: During a three-year period from 2007 to 2010, 22 patients with burn scar contracture and 12 patients with post-traumatic skin defects on their hands were treated with full-thickness skin graft operations. The palmar skin and soft tissue defects after release of burn scar contracture or debridement of post-traumatic wounds were reconstructed with full-thickness skin grafts harvested from the ulnar border of their palms. All donor-site wounds were primarily closed. Results: The followup periods ranged from 3 to 25 months. Contractures of the hand were corrected without recurrence, and the grafts showed relatively good contour and color match to the adjacent fields. There were no reported complications such as significant color change or hypertrophic scarring. The grafted skin showed an average 5.9 mm static two-point discrimination obtained in fingertip reconstruction cases, indicating satisfactory reinnervation. Conclusion: Glabrous full-thickness grafts harvested from the palmar ulnar border is a very useful way of reconstructing soft tissue defects on hands, including fingertips, for function restoration, favorable aesthetic results, and low donor-site morbidity.