• Title, Summary, Keyword: blend juice

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Effect of Concentration Methods on the Quality of Single and Blended Juice Concentrates

  • Lee, Jun-Ho;Sohn, Kyoung-Suck
    • Preventive Nutrition and Food Science
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    • v.8 no.3
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    • pp.225-229
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    • 2003
  • Clarified apple, carrot and orange juices were prepared using ultrafiltration and their single and blend juices were further concentrated using ultrafiltration, freeze-drying, and rotary evaporation. Effect of concentration methods on the quality of concentrated single juices and juice blends was investigated. Turbidity values of samples concentrated by evaporation were significantly higher than those prepared by ultrafiltration and vacuum freezing regardless of juice source (i.e., apple, orange or carrot) or blending (p<0.05). The highest soluble solids contents were obtained for the samples concentrated by evaporation process. Concentrated apple juice contained significantly higher amount of vitamin C and soluble solids than concentrated orange and carrot juices regardless of concentration methods (p<0.05). For blended samples, no direct relationships between blend ratio and total amount of vitamin C were found; however, samples contained more apple juice showed the highest value of soluble solids regardless of concentration methods.

Use of Response Surface Methodology for Optimization of Clarified Mixed Apple and Carrot Juice Production (반응표면 분석을 이용한 사과.당근 혼합주스의 청징공정 최적화)

  • Seog, Eun-Ju;Lee, Jun-Ho
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Food Science and Nutrition
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    • v.35 no.8
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    • pp.1051-1056
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    • 2006
  • Response surface methodology was used to investigate the quality of clarified mixed apple and carrot juices using ultrafitration. Apple and carrot juices were blended at the ratio of 1:3, 1:1, and 3:1. A three-variable, three-level central composite design was employed where the independent variables were the blend ratio, temperature and average transmembrane pressure (ATP). With increasing temperature and pressure, flux linearly increased regardless of blending ratio. Blend juice with 75% apple showed the highest soluble sugar and total sugar content in apple and carrot blend juices. Soluble solid contents were more affected by blending ratio than temperature and ATP. Total sugar contents were greatly affected by temperature; increasing temperature led to higher total sugar content up to $25^{\circ}C$. Higher carrot ratio led to higher vitamin C content. In general, higher acidity was achieved by higher apple content and acidity was increased with increasing temperature. Turbidity increased for all samples as APT increased, with the blending ratio of 1:1 (apple:carrot) showing the highest turbidity. Viscosity was greatly changed in the blending ratio of 3:1 (apple:carrot) juice. The polynomial models developed by RSM were satisfactory to describe the relationships between the studied factors and the responses. Analytical optimization gave $flux=0.216\;L/m^2.h$, soluble $solids=10.39^{\circ}Brix$, total sugar=71.32 mg/mL, vitamin C=315.18 mg%, acidity=7.78 mL, turbidity=0.017, and viscosity=1.44 cp, when using a $temperature=44.97^{\circ}C$, ATP=113.57 kPa, and blend ratio=28.50%.

Characterization of Mixed Apple and Carrot Retentates Using Response Surface Methodology

  • Lee, Jun-Ho
    • Preventive Nutrition and Food Science
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    • v.11 no.2
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    • pp.155-159
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    • 2006
  • Models capable of predicting the product quality of mixed apple and carrot retentates (MACR) have been developed using response surface methodology and used to characterize the effects of processing conditions including average transmembrane pressure (ATP), temperature, and blend ratio. Color, soluble solids, total sugar, vitamin C, acidity, turbidity, and viscosity were used to assess the product quality following the ultrafiltration (UF) process. $L^*-value$ decreased with increased ATP, but the value was not affected by changes in temperature. Blend ratio also greatly influenced the $L^*-value$. Redness ($a^*-value$), on the other hand, was less affected by temperature and ATP. As the ATP and temperature increased, yellowness increased gradually. Soluble solids contents appeared to decrease gradually as the ATP increased for all blend samples, but the effect of temperature seemed to be less. Total sugar content was more affected by temperature than ATP. In general, samples containing 75% carrot had higher amounts of vitamin C regardless of processing conditions. Changes in acidity were also complex and appeared to respond to interactions among ATP, temperature, and blend ratio. Turbidity increased for all samples as both ATP and temperature increased. The higher the amount of carrot in the blend samples, the higher values for turbidity. Although the changes were small, viscosity appeared to increase as the ATP and temperature increased during UF.

Clarification of Mixed Fruit and Vegetable Juices Using Various Clarification Methods (혼합과채주스의 청징 및 품질특성 비교)

  • Sohn, Kyung-Suck;Lee, Jun-Ho
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Food Science and Nutrition
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    • v.35 no.5
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    • pp.629-634
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    • 2006
  • Clarified mixed fruit and vegetable (apple, carrot and orange) juices were prepared using different clarification methods including centrifugation, ultrafiltration (UF), and combined treatment with the blend ratio of 1:1:2, 1:2:1, and 2:1:1 (apple, orange and carrot). Effects of clarification methods on the clarification efficacy as well as other quality parameters were investigated. Clarification was improved with increase in centrifugation speed but was less affected by lowering temperature. Ultrafiltration process was very effective to produce clarified mixed fruit and vegetable juice. Combined treatment did not significantly improve the clarification efficacy since most clarification was already achieved during ultrafiltration process (p>0.05). L*- and b*-values increased while a*-value decreased significantly after clarification regardless of methods in all blend juices (p<0.05). Blend juices with high amount of orange or carrot were better in clarification efficacy and high amount of apple resulted in high turbidity in blend samples.

Physicochemical and Sensory Properties, and Bioactive Compounds of Blended Grape Juice from Different Grape Varieties (캠벨과 타품종 포도주스의 브렌딩에 의한 품질 및 기능특성)

  • Cabrera, Shirley G.;Jang, Ji-Hyun;Lee, Hyeon-Jeong;Moon, Kwang-Deog
    • Korean Journal of Food Preservation
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    • v.15 no.6
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    • pp.783-790
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    • 2008
  • Campbell juice (25%, 50%, 70% and 90%) was blended with different concentrations (10%, 25%, 30% and 50%) of juice from a range of grape varieties including Kyoho, Steuben and MBA. The concentrations of Campbell and the grape variety juices influenced the physicochemical characteristics of the blended grape juice. As the concentration of Campbell juice increased, there was an increase in the mean content of bioactive compounds including total phenolics, anthocyanin and flavonoids, and the radical scavenging activity increased. The treatment containing 25% juice from the various grape varieties had the lowest level of bioactive compounds. A sensory evaluation showed there was no significant difference among the blended juice samples in terms of aroma. The sample comprising 50% Campbell + 50% Kyoho was the most acceptable in terms of taste and overall acceptability, while the sample comprising 90% Campbell + 10% MBA was the most acceptable in terms of color and aroma.