• Title, Summary, Keyword: cancer

Search Result 24,737, Processing Time 0.066 seconds

Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus 16 in Esophageal Cancer Among the Chinese Population: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

  • Zhang, Shao-Kai;Guo, Lan-Wei;Chen, Qiong;Zhang, Meng;Liu, Shu-Zheng;Quan, Pei-Liang;Lu, Jian-Bang;Sun, Xi-Bin
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
    • /
    • v.15 no.23
    • /
    • pp.10143-10149
    • /
    • 2015
  • Background and Aim: No firm evidence of HPV infection in esophageal cancer has been established to date. The aim of this meta-analysis was to investigate the prevalence of HPV 16 in esophageal cancer in China, which had a high burden of the disease. Materials and Methods: Studies on HPV infection and esophageal cancer were identified and a random-effects model was used to pool the summary prevalence and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: A total of 3,429 esophageal cancer cases were evaluated from 26 eligible studies in this meta-analysis. The summary estimate for HPV16 prevalence was 0.381 (95% CI: 0.283, 0.479). The prevalence varied by geographical areas of the study, publication year, HPV detection method and types of specimen. In sensitivity analysis, HPV 16 prevalence ranged from 0.368 (95% CI: 0.276, 0.460) to 0.397 (95% CI: 0.286, 0.508). Conclusions: The results indicate a relatively high level of HPV 16 prevalence in esophageal cancer among Chinese population, although there was variation between different variables. Further studies are needed to elucidate the role of HPV in esophageal carcinogenesis with careful consideration of study design and laboratory detection method, providing more accurate assessment of the HPV status in esophageal cancer.

Prediction of Cancer Incidence and Mortality in Korea, 2017

  • Jung, Kyu-Won;Won, Young-Joo;Oh, Chang-Mo;Kong, Hyun-Joo;Lee, Duk Hyoung;Lee, Kang Hyun
    • Cancer Research and Treatment
    • /
    • v.49 no.2
    • /
    • pp.306-312
    • /
    • 2017
  • Purpose This study aimed to report on cancer incidence and mortality for the year 2017 in Korea in order to estimate the nation's current cancer burden. Materials and Methods Cancer incidence data from 1999 to 2014 were obtained from the Korea National Cancer Incidence Database, and cancer mortality data from 1993 to 2015 were acquired from Statistics Korea. Cancer incidence and mortality were projected by fitting a linear regression model to observe age-specific cancer rates against observed years, and then multiplying the projected age-specific rates by the age-specific population. The Joinpoint regression model was used to determine at which year the linear trend changed significantly; we only used data of the latest trend. Results A total of 221,143 new cancer cases and 80,268 cancer deaths are expected to occur in Korea in 2017. The most common cancer sites are the colorectum, stomach, lung, thyroid, and breast. These five cancers represent half of the overall burden of cancer in Korea. For mortality, the most common sites are the lung, liver, colorectal, stomach, and pancreas. Conclusion The incidence rate of all cancers in Korea appears to have decreased mainly because of a decrease in thyroid cancer. These up-to-date estimates of the cancer burden in Korea could be an important resource for planning and evaluation of cancer-control programs.

Analysis of Cancer Incidence in Zhejiang Cancer Registry in China during 2000 to 2009

  • Du, Ling-Bin;Li, Hui-Zhang;Wang, Xiang-Hui;Zhu, Chen;Liu, Qing-Min;Li, Qi-Long;Li, Xue-Qin;Shen, Yong-Zhou;Zhang, Xin-Pei;Ying, Jiang-Wei;Yu, Chuan-Ding;Mao, Wei-Min
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
    • /
    • v.15 no.14
    • /
    • pp.5839-5843
    • /
    • 2014
  • Objective: The Zhejiang Provincial Cancer Prevention and Control Office collected cancer registration data during 2000 to 2009 from 6 cancer registries in Zhejiang province of China in order to analyze the cancer incidence. Methods: Descriptive analysis included cancer incidence stratified by sex, age and cancer site group. The proportions and cumulative rates of 10 common cancers in different groups were also calculated. Chinese population census in 1982 and Segi's population were used for calculating age-standardized incidence rates. The log-linear model was used for fitting to calculate the incidence trends. Results: The 6 cancer registries in Zhejiang province in China covered a total of 60,087,888 person-years during 2000 to 2009 (males 30,445,904, females 29,641,984). The total number of new cancer cases were 163,104 (males 92,982, females 70,122). The morphology verified cases accounted for 69.7%, and the new cases verified only by information from death certification accounted for 1.23%. The crude incidence rate in Zhejiang cancer registration areas was $271.5/10^5$ during 2000 to 2009 (male $305.41/10^5$, female $236.58/10^5$), age-standardized incidence rates by Chinese standard population (ASIRC) and by world standard population (ASIRW) were $147.1/10^5$ and $188.2/10^5$, the cumulative incidence rate (aged from 0 to 74) being 21.7%. The crude incidence rate was $209.6/10^5$ in 2000, and it increased to $320.20/10^5$ in 2009 (52.8%), with an annual percent change (APC) of 4.51% (95% confidence interval, 3.25%-5.79%). Age-specific incidence rate of 80-84 age group was achieved at the highest point of the incidence curve. Overall with different age groups, the cancer incidences differed, the incidence of liver cancer being highest in 15-44 age group in males; the incidence of breast cancer was the highest in 15-64 age group in females; the incidences of lung cancer were the highest in both males and females over the age of 65 years. Conclusions: Lung cancer, digestive system malignancies and breast cancer are the most common cancers in Zhejiang province in China requiring an especial focus. The incidences of thyroid cancer, prostate cancer, cervical cancer and lymphoma have increased rapidly. Prevention and control measures should be implemented for these cancers.

Asian Cancer Registry Forum 2014-Regional Cooperation for Cancer Registration: Priorities and Challenges

  • Moore, Malcolm A.;Sangrajrang, Suleeporn;Bray, Freddie
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
    • /
    • v.15 no.5
    • /
    • pp.1891-1894
    • /
    • 2014
  • In February 6-7th, the Thai National Cancer Institute, the International Agency for Research on Cancer and its Mumbai Hub for Cancer Registration, together with the International Association of Cancer Registries and the APOCP/APJCP, jointly organized an Asian cancer registry forum to discuss regional cooperation for cancer registration. Held in the Grande Mercure Fortune Hotel, Bangkok, the meeting brought together leading scientists in cancer registration from South-East and North-East Asia as well as Australia, India and Iran and IARC itself, with coverage of various priorities and challenges of cancer registries regarding cancer control policy, operational parameters, assessment of survival and contributions to screening, for example. The current situation was highlighted and future directions and possible expansion of activities were discussed, with especial attention to the necessity for networks to help improve cancer registration across Asia and Africa.

Analysis of Death Causes of In-patients with Malignant Tumors in Sichuan Cancer Hospital of China from 2002 to 2012

  • Wang, Xiao;Song, Zheng-Fang;Xie, Rui-Meng;Pei, Jiao;Xiang, Ming-Fei;Wang, Huan
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
    • /
    • v.14 no.7
    • /
    • pp.4399-4402
    • /
    • 2013
  • Objectives: To analyze underlying disease, fatality rate and the major causes of death of in-patients with malignant tumors in Sichuan Cancer Hospital. Methods: Clinical data of in-patients from 2002 to 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. Results: The top 10 tumors (82.0%of the total) of the malignant tumors of the in-patients were lung, cervical, esophagus, breast, colorectal, nasopharynx, liver and gastric cancers, lymphomas and ovarian cancers. The overall fatality rate was 2.7% during these eleven years, 3.4% and 2.0% for male and females, respectively with statistical significance for the difference (${\chi}^2$=164.737, P<0.001). The top 10 death causes were lung cancer, liver cancer, colorectal cancer, esophagus cancer, gastric cancer, lymphoma, breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, ovarian cancer and nasopharynx cancer. In-patients with pancreatic cancer had the highest fatality rate (9.6%). There were different ranks of death causes in different sex groups and age groups. Conclusion: Prevention and control work of cancer should be enhanced not only for cancers with high incidence such as lung cancer, esophageal cancer but also for the cancers which have low incidence but high fatality rate, such as pancreatic cancer and gallbladder cancer, which would help to improve the survival rate and quality of life of cancer patients in the future.

Current Trends in the Incidence and Survival Rate of Urological Cancers in Korea

  • Joung, Jae Young;Lim, Jiwon;Oh, Chang-Mo;Jung, Kyu-Won;Cho, Hyunsoon;Kim, Sung Han;Seo, Ho Kyung;Park, Weon Seo;Chung, Jinsoo;Lee, Kang Hyun;Won, Young-Joo
    • Cancer Research and Treatment
    • /
    • v.49 no.3
    • /
    • pp.607-615
    • /
    • 2017
  • Purpose This descriptive study assessed the current trends in the incidence of urological cancers and patient survival in Korea. Materials and Methods In this nationwide retrospective observational study based on the data from the Korea National Cancer Incidence Database (KNCIDB), this study analyzed the age-standardized incidence rates (ASRs) and annual percentage changes (APCs) of kidney, bladder, prostate, testicular, and penile cancers as well as cancer of the renal pelvis and ureter between 1999 and 2012. The relative survival rates (RSRs) were calculated for urological cancer patients diagnosed between 1993 and 2012 from the KNCIDB data. Results Prostate cancer was diagnosed in 66,812 individuals followed by bladder (41,549) and kidney (36,836) cancers. The overall ASR (18.26 per 100,000) increased with age because of the higher ASRs of bladder and prostate cancers in the elderly. The ASR for kidney cancer was highest in the 40-59-year-old group, whereas testicular cancer occurred most frequently before the age of 40. The incidence of most urological cancers increased (overall APC, 6.39%; p < 0.001), except for penile (APC, -2.01%; p=0.05) and bladder (APC, -0.40%; p=0.25) cancers. The overall survival increased steadily (5-year RSR, 66.4% in 1993-1995 vs. 84.2% in 2008-2012; p < 0.001), particularly for prostate (by 34.10%) and kidney (by 16.30%) cancers, but not for renal pelvis and ureter cancers (-7.20%). Conclusion The most common urological cancer in Korea was prostate cancer followed by bladder and kidney cancers. The incidence of most urological cancers, except for penile and bladder cancers, increased. Survival also increased, particularly for prostate and kidney cancers.

Global Activity of Cancer Registries and Cancer Control and Cancer Incidence Statistics in Korea (암등록과 암관리사업의 최신 국제 경향 및 우리나라 암발생 통계)

  • Shin, Hai-Rim
    • Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health
    • /
    • v.41 no.2
    • /
    • pp.84-91
    • /
    • 2008
  • The World Health Organization (WHO) reported that cancer killed 7.6 million people in the world in 2005, and that 40% of all cancer deaths can be prevented. According to the WHO Global Action Plan Against Cancer (GAPAC), monitoring of cancer patients is the essential part of cancer control, and should be conducted through cancer registration. Originally, cancer registries were primarily concerned with the description of cancer patterns, trends of cancer occurrence, and etiology of cancer. In the last 20 years, cancer registries provided not only information on the incidence and characteristics of specific cancers, but also supplied the source of cancer control planning and evaluation and the care of individual cancer patients with survival. Cancer Incidence in Five Continents (CI5) presents incidence data from populations all over the world every five year. Volume IX in the series (data for 1998-2002) has recently (November 2007) been published online at International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Nine data from Korea Central Cancer Registry (National data), Seoul, Busan, Daegu, Gwangju, Incheon, Daejeon, Usan, Jejudo regional cancer registries were included in that volume. In this paper, the editorial process, the characteristics of national data, and quality indices in CI5 IX are being described. In addition, cancer control activities related to cancer registration in some selected countries are also presented.

Association of Breast Cancer with Sleep Pattern - A Pilot Case Control Study in a Regional Cancer Centre in South Asia

  • Datta, Karabi;Roy, Asoke;Nanda, Durgaprasad;Das, Ila;Guha, Subhas;Ghosh, Dipanwita;Sikdar, Samar;Biswas, Jaydip
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
    • /
    • v.15 no.20
    • /
    • pp.8641-8645
    • /
    • 2014
  • The rising trend of breast cancer both in developed and developing countries is a real threat challenging all efforts to screening, prevention and treatment aspects to reduce its impact. In spite of modern preventive strategies, the upward trend of breast cancer has become a matter of great concern in both developed and developing countries. Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute is a premier regional cancer institute in eastern region of India catering to a large number of cancer patients every year. A pilot case control study of fifty breast cancer patients and 100 matched controls was conducted during 2013 to evaluate the effects of habitual factors like working in night shift, not having adequate sleep, and not sleeping in total darkness on breast cancer of women. The study revealed that not sleeping in total darkness was associated with higher odds of outcome of breast cancer of women. This positive correlation can play a vital role in formulation of preventive strategies through life style modification.