• Title, Summary, Keyword: caudal occipital malformation syndrome

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Caudal occipital malformation syndrome in 10 dogs (개의 후두골 이형성 증후군 10례)

  • Choi, Ji-hye;Kim, Hye-jin;Kim, Hyun-wook;Lee, Eun-chang;Jang, Jae-young;Ban, Hyun-jung;Kim, Jin-kyung;Yoon, Junghee
    • Korean Journal of Veterinary Research
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    • v.46 no.4
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    • pp.399-403
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    • 2006
  • Caudal occipital malformation syndrome (COMS) is relatively common disease which occurs at craniocervical junction. It has been known that this syndrome was developed mainly in Cavalier King Charles spaniels, but these days there are a lot of case reports about COMS in other small breed dogs. In this report, COMS was diagnosed in ten dogs presented to Haemaru Referral Animal Hospital using MRI examination from January 2005 to April 2006. These cases were also investigated about concurrent diseases and syringomyelia was the most common type of complication, but clinical signs were nonspecific. COMS could be controlled by medical therapy with corticosteroid except cases with concurrent meningitis. It is considered that the present report could provide information regarding imaging and clinical features of COMS such as concurrent diseases, clinical signs, and prognosis in small animal practice despite of limited case numbers.

Foramen Magnum Decompression with Adipose Tissue Grafting for Caudal Occipital Malformation Syndrome in a Maltese Dog

  • Park, Sung-Guon;Moon, Hee-Sup;Kim, Sang-Yeon;Hong, Su-Bin;Kim, Tae-Hwan;Hwang, Tae-Sung;Lee, Sung-Lim;Lee, Hee-Chun;Park, Hyun;Lee, Jaehoon
    • Journal of Veterinary Clinics
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    • v.33 no.6
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    • pp.381-384
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    • 2016
  • A 7-year-old intact female Maltese dog was referred to the hospital with a history of paresis in the hind limbs, left head turn, and a loss of balance that persisted for 2 weeks. Her condition was initially managed with steroids, prescribed by the referring veterinarian, but her neurological symptoms were not alleviated. Physical and neurological examinations, radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging were performed. Based on the findings on these examinations, caudal occipital malformation syndrome (COMS) with syringohydromyelia was diagnosed. Medical treatment was not effective in the previous trial; therefore, foramen magnum decompression, durotomy, and free autogenous adipose tissue grafting were performed. After 3 days, an improvement was observed in the clinical symptoms and was maintained for 8 months postoperatively. Based on the results, it is suggested that the decompression method with a fat graft may be considered an effective surgical treatment for the management of COMS that did not respond well to previous medical treatment.

Foramen Magnum Decompression with Duraplasty Using Lyoplant® for Caudal Occipital Malformation Syndrome in a Dog

  • Park, Wan-Sang;Kang, SungHun;Kim, Jun-Su;Park, Sung-Guon;Moon, Hee-Sup;Kim, Sang-yeon;Hong, Sung-Jin;Hwang, Tae-Sung;Lee, Hee-Chun;Hwang, Yong-Hyun;Park, Hyun;Lee, Jae-Hoon
    • Journal of Veterinary Clinics
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    • v.34 no.6
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    • pp.449-453
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    • 2017
  • A 3-year-old castrated male Maltese dog, weighing 4.8 kg was referred with hindlimb ataxia and right forelimb proprioceptive deficits were shown for 20 months. Chiari-like malformation and syringomyelia diagnosed through MRI at a local animal hospital and Knuckling of right forelimb and reluctance to walk were managed with steroid. The medical management was getting ineffective to manage for the symptoms one month before referred. Physical and neurological examinations, radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging were performed and diagnoses of caudal occipital malformation syndrome (COMS) and subsequent syringomyelia (SM) were made. Given that pharmacological treatment was previously ineffective, surgical intervention was recommended. Foramen magnum decompression with duraplasty using $Lyoplant^{(R)}$ was performed. Three days post-surgery, the dog showed improved gait and activity. After 2 months, the dog received no additional prescription medications. At the 12-month follow-up after surgery, the dog showed no clinical problems or recurrences, despite complete cessation of pharmacological treatment. In present report, we applied $Lyoplant^{(R)}$ as a dural graft has been carried out in a dog with COMS. Surgical decompression with $Lyoplant^{(R)}$ was an effective long-term (12-month) treatment for COMS without the need for any pharmacological treatment.