• Title, Summary, Keyword: edible oils

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Non-edible Vegetable Oils for Alternative Fuel in Compression Ignition Engines

  • No, Soo-Young
    • Journal of ILASS-Korea
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    • v.14 no.2
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    • pp.49-58
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    • 2009
  • Non-edible vegetable oils instead of edible vegetable oils as a substitute for diesel fuel are getting a renewed attention because of global reduction of green house gases and concerns for long-term food and energy security. Out of various non-edible vegetable oils, karanja, mahua, linseed, rubber seed and cotton seed oils are selected in this study. A brief review of recent works related to the application of the above five vegetable oils and its derivatives in CI engines is presented. The production technologies of biodiesel based on non-edible vegetable oils are introduced. Problems in vegetable oil or biodiesel fuelled CI engine are included. In addition, future works related to spray characteristics of non-edible vegetable oil or biodiesel from it are discussed. The biodiesel fuel, irrespective of the feedstock used, results in a decrease in the emission of hydrocardon (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), particulate matter (PM) and sulphur dioxide ($SO_2$). It is also said to be carbon neutral as it contributes no net carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Only oxides of nitrogen (NOx) are reported to increase which is due to oxygen content in the biodiesel fuel. The systematic assessment of spray char-acteristics of neat vegetable oils and its blends, neat biodiesel and its blends f3r use as diesel engine fuels is required.

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History of edible oils and fats industry in Korea (우리나라 식용유지 산업의 발자취)

  • Shin, Hyo-Sun
    • Food Science and Industry
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    • v.50 no.4
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    • pp.65-81
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    • 2017
  • In Korea, sesame oil has been used as a flavor source mainly by edible oil since ancient times, and it has been used by domestic screw pressing. In the 1960's, the demand for edible oils and fats increased significantly due to the improvement of national income and changes in food consumption patterns. In the early 1970's, a few edible oil manufacturing companies with modern solvent extraction and refining plants were established. In Korea, edible oil manufacturers account for more than 85% of employees with 50 or fewer employees. In Korea, there is a very shortage of raw materials for edible oils and fats, domestic production of edible oil is decreasing year by year and import volume is continuously increasing. While importing the edible oil bearing ingredients including soybean and extracted oil in the past, recently mainly imports crude oil and refines it in Korea. Soybean oil, palm oil and tallow account for 70~90% of total imported edible oils. Due to the recent well-being trend, the demand for olive, canola and grapeseed oils as household edible oil has increased and the production of blended oil has been greatly increased. Since the late 1980's, people have recognized edible oil and fat as a food instead of seasoning ingredient and have increased their edible oil and fat intake in Korea. Since the early 2000's, refined oil and fat products produced in Korea have been exported and is increasing every year.

SWNT Sensors for Monitoring the Oxidation of Edible Oils

  • Lee, Keunsoo;Lee, Kyongsoo;Lau, Vincent;Shin, Kyeong;Ju, Byeong-Kwon
    • Journal of Sensor Science and Technology
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    • v.22 no.4
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    • pp.239-243
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    • 2013
  • Several methods are available to measure the oxidation of edible oils, such as their acid, peroxide, and anisidine values. However, these methods require large quantities of reagents and are time-consuming tasks. Therefore, a more convenient and time-saving way to measure the oxidation of edible oils is required. In this study, an edible oil-condition sensor was fabricated using single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) made using the spray deposition method. SWNTs were dispersed in a dimethylformamide solution. The suspension was then sprayed using a spray gun onto a prefabricated Au/Ti electrode. To test the sensor, oxidized edible oils, each with a different acid value, were prepared. The SWNT sensors were immersed into these oxidized oils, and the resistance changes in the sensors were measured. We found that the conductivity of the sensors decreased as the oxidation level of the oil increased. In the case of the virgin oil, the resistance change ratio in the SWNT sensor S(%) = {[(Rf - Ri)]/Ri}(%) was more than 40% after immersion for 1 min. However, in the case of the oxidized oil, the resistance change ratio decreased to less than that of the response of the virgin oil. This result suggests that the change in the oil components induced by the oxidation process in edible oils is related to the conductivity change in the SWNT sensor.

Determination of Tocopherol Contents in Refined Edible Oils Using an HPLC Method

  • Hu, Jiang-Ning;Zhu, Xue-Mei;Adhikari, Prakash;Li, Dan;Kim, In-Hwan;Lee, Ki-Teak
    • Preventive Nutrition and Food Science
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    • v.14 no.3
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    • pp.260-264
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    • 2009
  • A high-performance liquid chromatography method was applied to determine the contents of tocopherols in edible oils using a LiChrosorb DIOL HPLC column and hexane fortified with 0.1% acetic acid in an isocratic mode. The validation of the method included tests for linearity, sensitivity, accuracy, precision, and recovery. All calibration curves showed good linear regression ($r^2$>0.9995) within the tested ranges. The established method offered good precision and accuracy with overall intra-day and inter-day variations of 0.94$\sim$4.27 and 1.77$\sim$ 4.88%, respectively. The tocopherol recoveries ranged from 91.44$\sim$108.90%. Subsequently, the method was successfully applied to qualitatively and quantitatively determine the total contents of $\alpha$, $\gamma$, and $\delta$-tocopherols in 12 selected refined edible oils, showing a range of 0.92 to 188.71 mg/100 g.

A Study on the Heated Edible Oils( I ) -Flow Properties of Soybean, Rapeseed, Rice bran, Corn and Perilla Oils- (가열식용유(加熱食用油)에 관(關)한 연구(硏究) ( I ) -대두(大豆), 채종(菜種), 미당(米糖), 옥수수, 들깨유(油) 유동성(流動性) 관(關)해서-)

  • Kim, Eun-Ae;Shin, Kab-Choul;Kim, Haeng-Ja;Park, Jae-Ok
    • Journal of Nutrition and Health
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    • v.10 no.3
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    • pp.1-6
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    • 1977
  • Flow properties of heated edible oils, such as soybean, rapeseed, rice bran, corn and perilla oils, were measured with Maron-Belner type capillary viscometer. These oils were heated at $180{\pm}5^{\circ}C$ (general cooking temperature) for $5{\sim}20$ hours except soybean oils ($5{\sim}40$ hours). Fluidities of these heated oils except rice bran oil were decreased according to heating time and decreasing ratio of fluidity was outstanding after 15 hour heating in corn oil and 20 hours heating in soybean and perilla oils. All the oils examined in this experiments except rice bran oil showed non-Newtonian motion after 15 hour hinting at high shear stress and Newtonian motion at less than 10 hour heating. In the soybean oil non-Newtonian flow property was outstanding after 30 hour heating at $180{\pm}5^{\circ}C$. Rice bran oil exhibit characteristic flow property, that is, non heated rice bran oil has lowest fluidity but heated one has highest fluidity compared to other oils examined in this experiment. Change of fluidity with extension of heating time was not detected and non heated rice bran oil showed non-Newtonian motion.

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Production of Edible Vegetable Oil : Status and Outlook (식물성 식용유의 생산현황과 전망)

  • Rhee, Joon-Shick
    • Applied Biological Chemistry
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    • v.27
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    • pp.80-87
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    • 1984
  • Although traditional Korean diet consists of Very little fats and oils, the increase of their consumption, especially vegetable oil, has been truly remarkable in recent years and this increase is attributed to the improvement of their dietary habit and the development of Korean food industry. On the other hand, domestic production of the edible vegetable oil did not increase at all. Naturally, foreign exchange (over a several hundred million U.S. dollars) is annually used in importing oil seed and/or oil per se. Under these circumstances, it is of utmost importance to maximize the domestic production of edible vegetable oil, although its complete self-sufficiency cannot be achieved. In this seminar, intake of fats and oils by Korean people, status and outlook of the domestic production and consumption of fats and oils will be discussed, with. emphasis on the utilization of agricultural by products and waste as a source of fats and oil.

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Physicochemical changes in edible oils (soybean, canola, palm, and lard) and fried foods (pork cutlet and potato) depending on fry number (튀김횟수에 따른 튀김식품(돈까스, 감자튀김) 및 식용유지(대두유, 카놀라유, 팜유, 돈지)의 변화)

  • Lee, Jung-Hoon;Park, Jung-Min;Kim, Ha-Jung;Koh, Jong-Ho;Kim, Jin-Man
    • Korean Journal of Food Science and Technology
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    • v.49 no.1
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    • pp.50-55
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    • 2017
  • The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of frying number on oxidative changes in edible oils and fried foods. According to the frying number, the extracted edible oils from pork cutlet and fried potato were used as experimental samples. The Ministry of Food and Drug Safety (MFDS) regulations permit edible oils to have <2.5 mg KOH/g of acid value and <50 meq/kg of peroxide value in food. However, there are no regulations for edible oils used to fry livestock. Animal foods contain protein and fat, and should be held to a different standard than ordinary food. Therefore, we present basic information and suggest the establishment of regulations for livestock frying oil and fried livestock.

Quality Stability of the Herb Pill Coated with Edible Oils Containing Rosemary Essential Oil (로즈마리를 첨가만 유지 코팅 생약제 환의 품질안정성)

  • Kwak, Yi-Sung;Choo, Jong-Jae
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Food Culture
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    • v.18 no.2
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    • pp.134-138
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    • 2003
  • Quality stability of the herb pill coated with edible oils containing rosemary was investigated. Herb pills were made of herb powders such as Panax ginseng, Cinnamomum cassia, Lycium chinense, Zyzyphus jujuba and Zingiber officinale. Rapeseed oil and lubriol were used as edible coating oil. After herb pills coated with edible oils with or without rosemary were stored at $40^{\circ}C$ for 180 days, the microbial viable cell counts and peroxide values(POV) of the herb pill were investigated. After 180 day storage, POVs of herb pills with only rapeseed oil or lubriol were 0.51 and 0.49 meq/kg, respectively. However, when rosemary was added in herb pills the POVs were decreased to 0.30 and 0.39 meq/kg, respectively. The addition of rosemary to the rapeseed oil and lubriol tended to decrease the microbial viable cell counts of the herb pill. The microbial viable cell counts of rapeseed oil and lubriol were 940 and 820CFU/g, respectively after 180 days of storage. However, these levels were suppressed to 720 and 640CFU/g by the resemary addition. On the other hand, the ginseng saponin content of herb pills was not affected by the rosemary addition during storage.

Enhancement of β-cyclodextrin Production and Fabrication of Edible Antimicrobial Films Incorporated with Clove Essential Oil/β-cyclodextrin Inclusion Complex

  • Farahat, Mohamed G.
    • Microbiology and Biotechnology Letters
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    • v.48 no.1
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    • pp.12-23
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    • 2020
  • Edible films containing antimicrobial agents can be used as safe alternatives to preserve food products. Essential oils are well-recognized antimicrobials. However, their low water solubility, volatility and high sensitivity to oxygen and light limit their application in food preservation. These limitations could be overcome by embedding these essential oils in complexed product matrices exploiting the encapsulation efficiency of β-cyclodextrin. This study focused on the maximization of β-cyclodextrin production using cyclodextrin glucanotransferase (CGTase) and the evaluation of its encapsulation efficacy to fabricate edible antimicrobial films. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimize CGTase production by Brevibacillus brevis AMI-2 isolated from mangrove sediments. This enzyme was partially purified using a starch adsorption method and entrapped in calcium alginate. Cyclodextrin produced by the immobilized enzyme was then confirmed using high performance thin layer chromatography, and its encapsulation efficiency was investigated. The clove oil/β-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes were prepared using the coprecipitation method, and incorporated into chitosan films, and subjected to antimicrobial testing. Results revealed that β-cyclodextrin was produced as a major product of the enzymatic reaction. In addition, the incorporation of clove oil/β-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes significantly increased the antimicrobial activity of chitosan films against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Salmonella Typhimurium, Escherichia coli, and Candida albicans. In conclusion, B. brevis AMI-2 is a promising source for CGTase to synthesize β-cyclodextrin with considerable encapsulation efficiency. Further, the obtained results suggest that chitosan films containing clove oils encapsulated in β-cyclodextrin could serve as edible antimicrobial food-packaging materials to combat microbial contamination.

Comparative Studies on the Fatty Acid Composition of Korean and Chinese Sesame Oils and Adulterated Sesame Oils with Commercial Edible Oils (국내산 및 중국산 참기름과 변조 참기름의 지방산 조성에 관한 연구)

  • 강치희;박재갑;박정웅;전상수;이승철;하정욱;황용일
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Food Science and Nutrition
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    • v.31 no.1
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    • pp.17-20
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    • 2002
  • This study was carried out to determine the composition of fatty acids from the samples such as Korean and Chinese sesame oils and adulterated sesame oils with commercial edible oils including soybean and corn oils collected in Gyeongnam area. The fatty acid composition of sesame oils extracted from commercial Korean and Chinese sesame showed similar pattern except the result that Korean sesame oils contained lower levels of palmitic acid, stearic acid and higher level of linolenic acid than Chinese sesame oils. In adulterated sesame oils with commercial soybean oil, the composition of linolenic acid was increased 0.73$\pm$0.05%, 1.25$\pm$0.04% by adding of commercial soybean oil, 3%, 9%, respectively. And that of the linoleic acid was 50.22$\pm$0.06%, 51.14$\pm$0.05% by 5%, 9% addition of commercial corn oil, respectively. From these results, sesame oils and adulterated sesame oils with commercial edible oils will be verified by the composition analysis of fatty acids.