• Title, Summary, Keyword: feedback

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The effectiveness of diverse types of written feedback: Comparative study of teacher and student feedback (다양한 종류의 피드백이 영어작문 향상에 미치는 효과: 교사.동료 피드백의 비교 연구)

  • Kim, Yanghee;Joo, Mijin
    • English Language & Literature Teaching
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    • v.16 no.4
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    • pp.133-152
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    • 2010
  • There is disagreement, among researchers, on the benefits of corrective feedback on L2 learners' written output. Some scholars advocate the usefulness of corrective feedback while some claim that error correction is ineffective and even harmful. So far, however, research outcomes cannot settle this debate. Based on this debate, this study examines whether there is a difference among diverse types of feedback on the effects of L2 learners' writing improvement. This study found that teacher's direct feedback was more effective than any other types of feedback on the effect of participants' writing improvement. In particular, teacher's direct feedback helped their improvement on grammar, mechanics, and form. Among the types of peer feedback, self-correction was the most effective. In teacher feedback, form-focused feedback had more effects than content-focused feedback, but no difference with regard to peer feedback. In addition, teacher's content-focused feedback was more effective than peer's content-focused feedback. Overall, in all types of feedback, teacher feedback was more effective than peer feedback. However, direct (form-focused) feedback was the most effective in teacher feedback, and self-correction in peer feedback. The least effective feedback in both teacher and peer feedback was indirect (form-focused) feedback, which is simple underlining of errors.

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Providing Effective Feedback within Pharmacy Practice Education (약학 실무실습교육에서의 효과적인 피드백)

  • Yoon, Jeong-Hyun
    • Korean Journal of Clinical Pharmacy
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    • v.27 no.2
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    • pp.55-62
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    • 2017
  • Experiential education is a core curriculum of pharmacy education. In experiential education, formative feedback is an integral component of learning and teaching process. Feedback is defined as information provided by a preceptor regarding student's performance based on direct observation. With effective feedback, students can have opportunities to reinforce or correct behaviors and to acquire knowledge or skills. Students highly value and appreciate feedback. They rank provision of effective feedback as one of the most important qualities of preceptors. Preceptors, however, lack an understanding of feedback or practical skills necessary for providing effective feedback. As a result in reality, the feedback provided to students can be differentially effective in improving students' learning. This article describes a theoretical understanding of feedback including definition and value, as well as types of feedback. In addition, practical aspects in providing feedback, such as contents, timing, techniques, and models, are addressed. By understanding the value of feedback and mastering various feedback skills, preceptors will promote students' learning and enhance educational outcomes of experiential education.

Effects of Positive/Corrective Feedback Ratio on Safety Behavior and Feedback Acceptance (긍정적/교정적 피드백 제공비율이 안전행동 및 피드백 수용도에 미치는 효과)

  • Lim, Sung Jun;Oah, Shezeen
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Safety
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    • v.33 no.4
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    • pp.72-77
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    • 2018
  • There are various approaches to prevent industrial accidents, of which the focus on human factors is behavior based safety(BBS). The BBS provides positive feedback on safety behavior and corrective feedback on unsafe behavior. Determining the feedback ratio of positive and correct feedback is an important issue in BBS. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of positive and corrective feedback ratio on safety performance and feedback acceptance. The participants of this study were sixty undergraduate and graduate students at C University in Seoul, Korea. Participants were asked to work on a simulated welding task. The independent variable of was different positive vs. corrective feedback ratio (1:1 and 1:4). The dependent variables were the amount and the number of correctly completed work tasks, compliance rate of safety behavior, and feedback acceptance. The experimental design of this study was 2 x 2 mixed design. The results showed that feedback, regardless of the ratio, increased both correctly completed work tasks and the compliance rate of safety behavior, while 1:1 positive vs. corrective feedback ratio was more effective than 1:4 ratio. In addition, 1:1 ratio produced higher level of feedback acceptance compared to 1:4 ratio.

Linearization of Nonlinear Control Systems using a Restricted Class of Dynamic Feedback (비선형 시스템의 제한된 dynamic feedback 을 사용한 선형화)

  • 이홍기;전홍태
    • Journal of the Korean Institute of Telematics and Electronics B
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    • v.31B no.8
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    • pp.47-56
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    • 1994
  • The dynamic feedback is well-known to be much more powerful tool in control than the static one. This paper deals with the dynamic feedback linearization of the nonlinear systems which are not (static) feedback linearizable. The dynamic feedback linearization problem is however too difficult to solve at momemt. Thus we introduce a restricted class of the dynamic feedback (pure integrators followed by the static feedback) which is often used to study the problems using dynamic feedback and obtain the necessary and sufficient conditions of the linearization problem using this class of the dynamic feedback.

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Student Perceptions of Different Feedback Givers' Written Responses

  • Kim, Jeong-Ok
    • English Language & Literature Teaching
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    • v.18 no.1
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    • pp.45-68
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    • 2012
  • This study aims to investigate the different opinions about feedback given to high level Middle School students about their writing.18 students in the Gifted Program participated in the study. They were divided into three groups through their presurvey answers according to their language learning opportunities and genders. Students language self-assessment was compared with achievement as well. Three times of students' written work were collected. They then received feedback from the teacher and their two peers respectively. With the teachers' and peers' feedback, they completed their final draft. The study then examines how much the students take feedback practically from the different feedback givers. Examples of formative and corrective feedback were arranged to find out the differences in the students practice when giving and taking feedback. These Gifted class students showed that they didn't care much about who gave them the feedback, instead they cared more about how much language competence they presumed the feedback giver had. Implications of the findings are discussed and future study is suggested.

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Teacher Written Feedback: Learner Preferences, Perceptions, and Teacher Reflections

  • Kim, Ji-Hyun
    • English Language & Literature Teaching
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    • v.16 no.1
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    • pp.19-40
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    • 2009
  • Teacher written feedback on student compositions has received tremendous attention in second language (L2) writing research. Notwithstanding the importance of understanding both teachers' and students' perspectives on the feedback process, much of the feedback research has only looked into one-side of the story - adopting either the teacher's or the student's perspective. The current study is an attempt to look into both sides of the story by examining the types of written feedback that students prefer, the extent to which students' preferences and teachers' actual feedback practice overlap, and the extent to which student perceptions of teacher feedback coordinate teacher self-reflections on their feedback practice. Three English composition classes (3 teachers and 46 students) at a university participated in this study. It analyzed student and teacher data from questionnaires and teacher written feedback on student compositions. The results showed that students' preference for feedback on global and local issues varied across the three composition classes. This is partly a consequence of how students perceived the type of feedback that their teachers practiced. Teacher self-reflection on and student perception of teacher written-feedback generally coordinated. These findings are discussed in light of how contextual factors affect learner perception of teacher written feedback and underscore the need for examining students' reactions to feedback and teacher self-reflection.

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The Effect of snatch technique improvement for men weightlifter of feedback support through quantity analysis by periods (주기적 정성적분석을 통한 훈련목표 제공이 남자 역도 인상기술 향상에 미치는 영향)

  • Moon, Young-Jin;Ryu, Jung-Hyun;Lee, Soon-Ho
    • Korean Journal of Sport Biomechanics
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    • v.14 no.2
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    • pp.69-83
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    • 2004
  • The purpose of this study is searching for technical merits and demerits of each weight lifting player through qualitative motion analysis system. Moreover, It is also analysis the repeating the establishment of exercise purpose and studying for the effect of the field adaptation. The subject of this study was five male weight lifting players who have been engaged in Korean Delegation Team. The institution of exercise target was made through two times qualitative analysis and the result of studying for the effect of the field adaptation was produced before offering feedback. Moreover, two time analysis added after offering feedback. All analysis was based on 2-D visual analysis. The results of this study are as follows: 1. Maximal barbell moving speed in starting phase was decreased after offering feedback. This result implies advancement of technical skills after offering feedback. 2. From starting posture to 앉아받기, forward and backward moving distance of hip joint was decreased after offering feedback in all subjects. This result represents advancement of technical skills after offering feedback. 3. In terms of pull phase, forward and backward moving distance of hip and shoulder joint was decreased after offering feedback in all subjects. This result represents advancement of technical skills after offering feedback. 4. In terms of pull phase, the difference of horizontal value of coordinates was decreased after offering feedback in all subjects. This result represents advancement of technical skills after offering feedback. 5. In terms of pull phase, the motion range of hip joint was decreased after offering feedback in three of five subjects and this represents advancement of technical skills after offering feedback. However, the rest of them were not variable or narrow decreasing. This result represents that feedback system could not brought tremendous effects. 6. From apex point of barbell to 앉아받기, the difference of barbell height was decreased after offering feedback in three of five subjects and this represents advancement of technical skills after offering feedback. However, the rest of them weren't variable or narrow increasing. This result represents that feedback system could not brought tremendous effects. 7. In terms of last-pull phase, the angular velocity of knee joint was increased after offering feedback in four of five subjects and this represents advancement of technical skills after offering feedback. However, the rest of them, only one subject, decreased. This result represents that feedback system could not brought tremendous effects. 8. In terms of last-pull, the conversional tendency of maximal extension to flextion came out all but simultaneously without offering feedback in four of five subjects. This is well-performed technique. Only one subject, however, could not use power effectively because the fact that his maximal extension came out in serial, from ankle to knee and waist means dispersion of power. In addition to, after offering feedback, only one subject made increasing the maximal extension of knee in last-pull and this result represents advancement of skills after offering feedback. However, the rest of them could not make meaningful development after offering feedback. 9. It might be assumed that searching for technical merits and demerits of each weight lifting player through qualitative motion analysis system could improve player's skill.

Kinetic Feedback Frequency Effects on Learning Weight Shifting Skills in Nondisabled Subjects (체중이동 과제 학습시 효과적인 운동학적 되먹임 유형과 상대적 빈도)

  • Cha, Seung-Kyu;Park, So-Yeon;Chung, Jin-Ho;Kim, Young-Ho
    • Physical Therapy Korea
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    • v.7 no.1
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    • pp.55-63
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    • 2000
  • Physical therapists have been using balance and weight shifting training to induce improvements in standing and walking. This study compared the effects of kinetic feedback frequency and concurrent kinetic feedback on the performance and learning of a weight shifting skill in young, nondisabled adults. Sixteen young adults without known impairment of the neuromusculoskeletal system volunteered for the study. Subjects in each of three kinetic feedback groups performed a weight shifting task in an attempt to minimize error between their effort and a center of pressure (COP) template for a 12 second period. Feedback was provided: 1) concurrently (concurrent feedback), 2) after each trial (100% feedback), 3) after every other trial (50% feedback). Immediate and delayed (24 hour) retention tests were performed without feedback. During acquisition phase, the concurrent feedback group exhibited less error than either of the post response feedback group. For the immediate retention test, the 50% feedback group exhibited less error than did the 100% feedback and concurrent feedback. During the delayed retention, 50% feedback group displayed less error than did the other groups. But no significant differences were found between groups. These results suggest that practice with concurrent feedback is beneficial for the immediate performance, but not for the learning of this weight shifting skill. Lower frequency of feedback resulted in more permanent changes in the subject's ability to complete the task.

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The Effect of Visual Feedback on One-hand Gesture Performance in Vision-based Gesture Recognition System

  • Kim, Jun-Ho;Lim, Ji-Hyoun;Moon, Sung-Hyun
    • Journal of the Ergonomics Society of Korea
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    • v.31 no.4
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    • pp.551-556
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    • 2012
  • Objective: This study presents the effect of visual feedback on one-hand gesture performance in vision-based gesture recognition system when people use gestures to control a screen device remotely. Backgroud: gesture interaction receives growing attention because it uses advanced sensor technology and it allows users natural interaction using their own body motion. In generating motion, visual feedback has been to considered critical factor affect speed and accuracy. Method: three types of visual feedback(arrow, star, and animation) were selected and 20 gestures were listed. 12 participants perform each 20 gestures while given 3 types of visual feedback in turn. Results: People made longer hand trace and take longer time to make a gesture when they were given arrow shape feedback than star-shape feedback. The animation type feedback was most preferred. Conclusion: The type of visual feedback showed statistically significant effect on the length of hand trace, elapsed time, and speed of motion in performing a gesture. Application: This study could be applied to any device that needs visual feedback for device control. A big feedback generate shorter length of motion trace, less time, faster than smaller one when people performs gestures to control a device. So the big size of visual feedback would be recommended for a situation requiring fast actions. On the other hand, the smaller visual feedback would be recommended for a situation requiring elaborated actions.

Incorporating Oral Corrective Feedback into the Business English Writing Class

  • Kim, Bu-Ja
    • English Language & Literature Teaching
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    • v.17 no.3
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    • pp.73-98
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    • 2011
  • This study investigated the feasibility and effectiveness of incorporating oral corrective feedback into the content-based business English writing class. Two types of oral corrective feedback, recasts and metalinguistic feedback, were integrated into business English writing classes to help low intermediate-proficiency Korean university students improve the ability to use the simple past, present progressive, and present perfect tenses correctly in their written production. Prior to the treatments, the subjects had basic grammatical knowledge of the target verb tenses, but they had only limited control over them in their written production. Three groups were formed: recast group that received corrective recasting, metalinguistic group that received metalinguistic clues, and control group that received no oral corrective feedback. The study demonstrated that it was feasible to incorporate recasts and metalinguistic feedback into content-based business English writing classes and that metalinguistic feedback had greater and more endurable effects than recasts on promoting the correct use of the target verb tenses in written production. It can be concluded that oral corrective feedback, metalinguistic feedback in particular, can be used in the business English writing classroom to help students gain greater control over already partially acquired forms and therefore improve their writing accuracy.

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