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Assessing the Effect of Moral Concerns for Animals, Texture, Color and Satiety on Meat Avoidance (육류 기피에 미치는 동물에 대한 도덕관념, 질감, 색깔과 포만감의 영향 평가)

  • Kang, Jong-Heon;Bae, Seong-Sik
    • Korean Journal of Human Ecology
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    • v.16 no.6
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    • pp.1223-1230
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    • 2007
  • The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of moral concerns for animals, meat texture, color in meat and satiety from meat on meat avoidance, and to assess the effect of meat avoidance on meat consumption. A total of 250 questionnaires were completed. Structural equation model was used to measure the causal effects of constructs. Results of the study demonstrated that fit of the restricted model is significantly worse than that of the unrestricted model, in which more parameters are estimated. The effects of moral concerns for animals, meat texture, and satiety from meat on meat avoidance were statistically significant. The effect of meat avoidance on meat consumption was statistically significant. Moreover, meat avoidance played a mediating role in the relationship between moral concerns for animals and meat consumption. Meat avoidance also played a mediating role in the relationship between satiety from meat and meat consumption. This study suggested that the consumer decision-making process for meat products is best modeled as a complex system that incorporates both direct and indirect effects on meat consumption. This study believed the evidence presented supports this position. Moreover, this study appeared to be a worthy area of pursuit.

Measuring the Effect of Disgust with Meat Mediating the Factors Influencing Meat Consumption (육류 소비에 영향을 미치는 요인들을 매개하는 육류 혐오감의 효과 평가)

  • Bae, Seong-Sik;Kang, Jong-Heon
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Food Culture
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    • v.22 no.4
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    • pp.414-419
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    • 2007
  • The purpose of this study was to measure the effect of disgust with meat mediating the factors influencing meat consumption. Structural equation model was used to measure the causal relationships among constructs. The structural analysis Result of the data indicated excellent model fit. The effects of moral concerns for animals, meat texture and satiety from meat on disgust with meat were statistically significant. The effects of color in meat and negative body esteem on disgust with meat were not statistically significant. As expected, disgust with meat had a significant effect on meat consumption. Moreover, disgust with meat played a mediating role in the relationship between moral concerns for animals and meat consumption. Disgust with meat played a mediating role in the relationship between satiety from meat and meat consumption. Disgust with meat did not play a mediating role in the relationship between color in meat and meat consumption. Disgust with meat did not play a mediating role in the relationship between body esteem and meat consumption. In conclusion, based on structural analysis, a model was proposed of interrelations among constructs. It should be noted that the original model was modified and should, preferably, be validated in future research.

Measuring the Causal Effect of Disgust with Meat on Pork Consumption (육류에 대한 혐오감이 돼지고기 소비에 미치는 인과 효과 평가)

  • Kang, Jong-Heon;Bae, Seong-Sik
    • Journal of the East Asian Society of Dietary Life
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    • v.17 no.5
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    • pp.653-660
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    • 2007
  • The purpose of this study was to measure the causal relationships among such variables as moral concerns for animals, meat texture, meat color, satiety from meat, disgust with meat and pork consumption. A total of 250 questionnaires were completed. Structural equation models were used to measure the causal effects of the constructs. The study outcomes demonstrated that the structural analysis results of the data were an excellent model fit. The effects of moral concerns for animals, meat texture and satiety from meat on the disgust with meat were statistically significant. As expected, disgust with meat had a significant effect on pork consumption. Moreover, moral concerns for animals and satiety from meat had a significant indirect effect on pork consumption through disgust with meat. Also, satiety from meat alone had a significant indirect effect on pork consumption through disgust with meat. By developing and testing conceptual models that integrated the relationships among ideational variables, sensory affective variables, anticipated consequences variables, emotional variables, and behavioral variables, this study may approach a deeper understanding of the complex relationships among pork consumption-related variables. A greater understanding of these complex relationships can improve the managerial diagnosis of problems as well as opportunities for different marketing strategies, including pork production and pork product development, and marketing communications.

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Meat analog as future food: a review

  • Ismail, Ishamri;Hwang, Young-Hwa;Joo, Seon-Tea
    • Journal of Animal Science and Technology
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    • v.62 no.2
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    • pp.111-120
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    • 2020
  • The definition of meat analog refers to the replacement of the main ingredient with other than meat. It also called a meat substitute, meat alternatives, fake or mock meat, and imitation meat. The increased importance of meat analog in the current trend is due to the health awareness among consumers in their diet and for a better future environment. The factors that lead to this shift is due to low fat and calorie foods intake, flexitarians, animal disease, natural resources depletion, and to reduce greenhouse gas emission. Currently, available marketed meat analog products are plant-based meat in which the quality (i.e., texture and taste) are similar to the conventional meat. The ingredients used are mainly soy proteins with novel ingredients added, such as mycoprotein and soy leghemoglobin. However, plant-based meat is sold primarily in Western countries. Asian countries also will become a potential market in the near future due to growing interest in this product. With the current advance technology, lab-grown meat with no livestock raising or known as cultured meat will be expected to boost the food market in the future. Also, insect-based products will be promising to be the next protein resource for human food. Nevertheless, other than acceptability, cost-effective, reliable production, and consistent quality towards those products, product safety is the top priority. Therefore, the regulatory frameworks need to be developed alongside.

Status of meat alternatives and their potential role in the future meat market - A review

  • Lee, Hyun Jung;Yong, Hae In;Kim, Minsu;Choi, Yun-Sang;Jo, Cheorun
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.33 no.10
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    • pp.1533-1543
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    • 2020
  • Plant-based meat analogues, edible insects, and cultured meat are promising major meat alternatives that can be used as protein sources in the future. It is also believed that the importance of meat alternatives will continue to increase because of concerns on limited sustainability of the traditional meat production system. The meat alternatives are expected to have different roles based on their different benefits and limitations. Plant-based meat analogues and edible insects can replace traditional meat as a good protein source from the perspective of nutritional value. Furthermore, plant-based meat can be made available to a wide range of consumers (e.g., as vegetarian or halal food products). However, despite ongoing technical developments, their palatability, including appearance, flavor, and texture, is still different from the consumers' standard established from livestock-based traditional meat. Meanwhile, cultured meat is the only method to produce actual animal muscle-based meat; therefore, the final product is more meat-like compared to other meat analogues. However, technical difficulties, especially in mass production and cost, remain before it can be commercialized. Nevertheless, these meat alternatives can be a part of our future protein sources while maintaining a complementary relationship with traditional meat.

Dog Meat Eating History and Culture in Korea (한국의 개고기 식용의 역사와 문화)

  • 안용근
    • The Korean Journal of Food And Nutrition
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    • v.12 no.4
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    • pp.387-396
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    • 1999
  • Dog meat was begun to be edible by the Chinese, Japanese, the French, Belginan, German Philippines Vietnamese, North-Americans African-Indians Canadian-aborigines Alaskan aborigines including Kor-eans. According to the record, Korea has a long history to have eaten dog meat from the era of Sam-kug(three kingdoms BC 57∼AC 668) and so there are numerous languages proverbs, and customs re-lated to the dog meat. Over the long history there have been many records and recipes about the edib-leness of dog meat. But at present time only the way of cooking such as Bosintang(a soup) Suyuk(a boiled meat) Duruchighi(boiled meat added spice and slightly roasted) Muchim(boiled meat added by spice and mixed) Gaesoju(an extract) Jeongol(boiled meat mixed with spices vegetables and water on the pot) remains. Koreans eat dog meat following the traditional customs n the Boknal(hottest day in summer). Also the areas of Buyo. Sochon, Boryong adn Chongyang of Chungnam province and the ad-jacent areas like Kongju, Iksan, and Nonsan have customs to kill the dog and offer dog meat to the gue-sts in time of small or big occasions such as funeral ceremony Hoigap(anniversary of one's 60th birth-day) and one's birthday. This range of customs is expanding larger and larger. These areas are the cen-ter of past Baekche(BC 57∼AC 660). In spite of this it is unreasonable, and excessive action for foreig-ner to fine fault with the dog meat or Korean food culture.

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An Outline of Meat Consumption in the Indian Population - A Pilot Review

  • Devi, Subramaniam Mohana;Balachandar, Vellingiri;Lee, Sang In;Kim, In Ho
    • Food Science of Animal Resources
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    • v.34 no.4
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    • pp.507-515
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    • 2014
  • The consumption of meat is increasing in India and agriculture is considered as the backbone of a majority of people. Livestock plays a significant role, and poultry and dairy are the major sectors contributing to economic development. The majority of meats consumed in India are fish, bovine, mutton, goat, pig, and poultry. In Indian context, culture, traditions, customs, and taboos influence meat consumption to a great extent. However, studies show that urbanization has been causing a rise in demand for meat products. India is the world's second largest exporter of beef. In India, 95% of goat meat produced is consumed locally. Meat consumption, in particular, is determined by the religions where pork is forbidden to Muslims and beef is prohibited to Hindus. The preference and consumption of chicken meat can be considered as a universal phenomenon and chicken meat is greatly accepted by consumers in India as compared to the other meat consumption. The increase of chicken meat consumption is due to the versatility of the meat, relatively low cost in comparison to other meat, and the acceptance of the chicken meat to all religions. There has been a great rise in the production of livestock products and this is expected to continue in the future. The pattern of meat consumption depends considerably on culture, tradition and urbanization. This review was formulated with the objective of identifying the meat consumption patterns in a typical Indian society.

Effect of Ultrasonic Treatment on the Quality of Frying Chicken Meat (초음파 처리가 튀김 닭고기의 품질에 미치는 영향)

  • 정인철;박성하;문윤희
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Food Science and Nutrition
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    • v.30 no.2
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    • pp.256-260
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    • 2001
  • This study was carried out to investigate effect of ultrasonic treatment on the quality of frying chicken meat. Moisture content of ultrasonic treated leg meat was lowest to 59.7%, moisture content of breast meat was higher than leg meat and protein content of control was higher than ultrasonic treatment. Fat content of ultrasonic treatment was higher than control and leg meat was higher than breast meat. Hunter's L (lightness) and a (redness)-value was not different between frying methods, but L-value of breast meat and a-value of leg meat was higher than leg and breast meat, respectively. Hunter's b (yellowness)-value was not different among frying chicken meats. Frying loss of ultrasonic treatment was significantly lower than control, water holding capacity was higher than control. VBN content of ultrasonic treatment was comparatively higher than control, TBA number of ultrasonic treatment was highest to 0.78mg malonaldehyde/kg. Hardness, springiness and cohesiveness of frying chicken meat was not different between frying methods, but difference of chicken muscle parts were significantly showed. Chewiness was not different among frying chicken meats and shear force value of control breast meat was lowest to 1.9kg. In case of sensory score, aroma and taste of frying chicken meat were out different between frying methods, but texture, juiciness and palatability of ultrasonic treatment were higher than control and that of breast meat were higher than leg meat.

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Quality Characteristics of Beef Jerky made with Beef meat of various Places of Origin (쇠고기 원산지 차이에 의한 육포의 품질 특성)

  • Park Ji-Hyoung;Lee Kyung-Hee
    • Korean journal of food and cookery science
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    • v.21 no.4
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    • pp.528-535
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    • 2005
  • This paper aims to compare and evaluate the quality of beef jerky made with Korean beef meat, Korean beef cattle and imported beef meat from Australia and New Zealand through sensory evaluation, measurement of hardness, thickness and contents of the moisture and crude lipid, and microscopic texture observation (SEM). According to the sensory evaluation, beef jerky made with Korean beef meat recorded the highest score in overall acceptability; New Zealand beef meat, the lowest. The preference of beef jerky made with Korean beef meat was shown in the appearance, smell, and texture, and especially in the taste. Whereas Korean beef jerky scored highest in color, glaze and palatability, New Zealand beef meat showed the lowest score. Korean beef meat showed the lowest in hardness, but New Zealand beef meat showed the highest as shown in the result of technical evaluation through rheometer. The evaluation through colormeter concluded that New Zealand beef meat had the highest scores in L and a values, but that Korean beef meat showed the lowest score. When it comes to the color difference compared with Korean beef meat, New Zealand beef meat showed the biggest difference. Although the moisture contents of jerky made with different beef meat showed little difference, the content of the crude lipid of jerky made with Korean beef meat and Australian beef meat was lower than that of Korean beef cattle and New Zealand beef meat. When the beef jerky is dry, fat contained in the beef meat is dissolved, which causes the glaze on the outside. Scanning electron micrographs showed that Korean and Australian beef jerky had larger gaps than Korean beef cattle and New Zealand beef jerky. It was concluded that this affected the hardness of beef jerky.

Goat Meat Production: Present Status and Future Possibilities

  • Dhanda, J.S.;Taylor, D.G.;Murray, P.J.;Pegg, R.B.;Shand, P.J.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.16 no.12
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    • pp.1842-1852
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    • 2003
  • The bulk of the world's goat population is found in South-East Asia and Africa, where goats are the major source of meat production. Unfortunately, lack of an organized goat meat industry and marketing structure in developing countries is primarily responsible for their poor export earnings compared to those in developed countries such as Australia and New Zealand. Goat meat is leaner than meat from other domestic red meat species as well as being comparable in terms of its nutritional constituents. Furthermore, there are few, if any, religious or cultural taboos limiting the consumption of goat meat. Development of a carcass grading system and a suitable infrastructure in developing countries are some of the key requirements needed to establish a sustainable goat meat industry in the world. With an increase in demand by consumers for low-fat red meat alternatives, the future of the goat meat industry looks promising.