• Title, Summary, Keyword: microbial growth

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Modeling of Typical Microbial Cell Growth in Batch Culture

  • Jianqiang Lin;Lee, Sang-Mok;Lee, Ho-Joon;Koo, Yoon-Mo
    • Biotechnology and Bioprocess Engineering:BBE
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    • v.5 no.5
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    • pp.382-385
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    • 2000
  • A mathematical model was developed, based on the time dependent changes of the specific growth rate, for prediction of the typical microbial cell growth in batch cultures. This model could predict both the lag growth phase and the stationary growth phase of batch cultures, and it was tested with the batch growth of Trichoderma reesei and Lactobacillus delbrueckii.

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Bacterial diversity and its relationship to growth performance of broilers

  • Bae, Yeonji;Koo, Bonsang;Lee, Seungbaek;Mo, Jongsuk;Oh, Kwanghyun;Mo, In Pil
    • Korean Journal of Veterinary Research
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    • v.57 no.3
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    • pp.159-167
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    • 2017
  • The microbial community is known to have a key role during the rearing period of broilers. In this study, gut microbial composition and diversity were examined to evaluate the relationships between these factors and broiler growth performance. By applying 454-pyrosequencing of the V1-V3 regions of bacterial 16S rRNA genes, six fecal samples from four- and 28-day-old chickens from three broiler farms and 24 intestinal samples of broilers with heavy and light body weights were analyzed. Microbial composition assessment revealed Firmicutes to be the most prevalent phylum at farm A, while Proteobacteria were predominant at farms B and C. Fecal microbial richness and diversity indices gradually increased from four to 28 days at all three farms. Microbial diversity assessment revealed that small intestine microbial diversity was lower in heavy birds than in light birds. In light birds, the Firmicutes proportion was lower than that in heavy birds. In conclusion, each broiler farm revealed a specific microbial profile which varied with the age of the birds. The microbial communities appeared to affect growth performance; therefore, gut microbial profiles can be utilized to monitor growth performance at broiler farms.

Relationship of Specific Microbial Growth and TBARS Value in Radiation-Sterilized Raw Ground Pork

  • Kim, Jae-Kyung;Jo, Cheo-Run;Kim, Hyun-Joo;Lee, Kyong-Haeng;Kim, Yeung-Ji;Byun, Myung-Woo
    • Preventive Nutrition and Food Science
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    • v.9 no.4
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    • pp.312-316
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    • 2004
  • Sterilized raw ground pork was inoculated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) and Lactobacillus casei (LC) to investigate the relationship between microbial growth and 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) values. The analyses including microbial growth, pH, and TBARS values were performed during 3 weeks of storage at room temperature $(20^{\circ}C)$. The radiation-sterilized control sample did not show any microbial growth, but the samples inoculated at different levels (diluted twice vs non-diluted) exhibited differences until 1 week. However, the difference disappeared at weeks 2 and 3. The pH of raw ground pork inoculated with PA increased, but that of LC decreased. The pH of non-inoculated samples increased slightly after storage. The TBARS values in non-inoculated and LC inoculated with pork increased, but TBARS remained unchanged in samples inoculated with PA after 1 week. Results indicated that the microbial growth level and strains can influence the TBARS value of raw ground pork. Thus, it is important to use samples exposed to the same microbial conditions to compare the oxidation of lipids in meat samples.

Effects of Chemical Compounds on Vase Life and Microbial Growth of Cut Calla Flowers

  • Lee, Seon-Ha;Kim, Jung-Ho
    • Plant Resources
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    • v.3 no.1
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    • pp.59-65
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    • 2000
  • The opening process of cut calla flower was faster at 30 t than at lower temperatures as it could be expected from its tropical origin. Gibberellin enhanced the flower opening, however, it also speeded up senescent. Silver thiosulfate was effective in prolonging the vase life of the cut calla flower. Silver thiosulfate reduced ethylene generation by the flower and inhibited microbial growth in the flower stalk. Reduction in ethylene generation and inhibition of microbial growth is thought to be responsible for the extension of the vase life of cut calla flowers by silver thiosulfate.

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Effects of Soil Microbial Agent with Red Ginseng Marc on Growth of Watermelon -A Field Study- (홍삼박을 활용한 토양미생물제제가 수박의 생육에 미치는 영향 -현장연구를 중심으로-)

  • Ryu, Hyo-Seung;Lee, Jong-Wha;Kim, Chang-Man;Choi, In-Hag
    • Journal of Environmental Science International
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    • v.24 no.12
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    • pp.1705-1710
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    • 2015
  • The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of soil microbial agent with red ginseng marc on growth of watermelon during 5 months. The three treatments were distributed in a completely randomized design with four replicates per plot. After 1 week in planting dates, the growth of watermelon (full length, stem thichness, leaf length and lead width) showed no significant difference in all treatments. During elongation stage (20 days), soil microbial agent with red ginseng marc was increased by 5% in leaf thickness (May 23) and 7~14% in leaf length (May 16 and 23) when compared to other treatments. For changes in fruit bearing thickness, there were no differences among treatments. Characteristics of watermelon in harvest season have an effect on harvest and length, stalk length, naval length, weight, sugar content and yield, except for harvest and width. In particular, yields increased with treatments with two soil microbial agent (7~12%), indicating that soil microbial agent with red ginseng marc showed higher yield than the other treatments. In conclusion, red ginseng marc-treated soil microbial agents have a positive effect on the harvest season of watermelon and can provide useful information for the selection of the functional microbial properties and the registration of microbial fertilizer.

Analysis of Temperature Effects on Microbial Growth Parameters and Estimation of Food Shelf Life with Confidence Band

  • Park, Jin-Pyo;Lee, Dong-Sun
    • Preventive Nutrition and Food Science
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    • v.13 no.2
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    • pp.104-111
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    • 2008
  • As a way to account for the variability of the primary model parameters in the secondary modeling of microbial growth, three different regression approaches were compared in determining the confidence interval of the temperature-dependent primary model parameters and the estimated microbial growth during storage: bootstrapped regression with all the individual primary model parameter values; bootstrapped regression with average values at each temperature; and simple regression with regression lines of 2.5% and 97.5% percentile values. Temperature dependences of converted parameters (log $q_o$, ${\mu}_{max}^{1/2}$, log $N_{max}$) of hypothetical initial physiological state, maximum specific growth rate, and maximum cell density in Baranyi's model were subjected to the regression by quadratic, linear, and linear function, respectively. With an advantage of extracting the primary model parameters instantaneously at any temperature by using mathematical functions, regression lines of 2.5% and 97.5% percentile values were capable of accounting for variation in experimental data of microbial growth under constant and fluctuating temperature conditions.

Population changes and growth modeling of Salmonella enterica during alfalfa seed germination and early sprout development

  • Kim, Won-Il;Ryu, Sang Don;Kim, Se-Ri;Kim, Hyun-Ju;Lee, Seungdon;Kim, Jinwoo
    • Food Science and Biotechnology
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    • v.27 no.6
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    • pp.1865-1869
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    • 2018
  • This study examined the effects of alfalfa seed germination on growth of Salmonella enterica. We investigated the population changes of S. enterica during early sprout development. We found that the population density of S. enterica, which was inoculated on alfalfa seeds was increased during sprout development under all experimental temperatures, whereas a significant reduction was observed when S. enterica was inoculated on fully germinated sprouts. To establish a model for predicting S. enterica growth during alfalfa sprout development, the kinetic growth data under isothermal conditions were collected and evaluated based on Baranyi model as a primary model for growth data. To elucidate the influence of temperature on S. enterica growth rates, three secondary models were compared and found that the Arrhenius-type model was more suitable than others. We believe that our model can be utilized to predict S. enterica behavior in alfalfa sprout and to conduct microbial risk assessments.

A Comparison of Ammonia and Preformed Protein as a Source of Nitrogen for Microbial Growth in the Rumen of Sheep Given Oaten Chaff

  • Kanjanapruthipong, J.;Leng, R.A.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.11 no.4
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    • pp.351-362
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    • 1998
  • Microbial growth efficiency in the rumen was studied in sheep given hourly, 31.25 g oaten chaff with either 0.31 and 0.88 g urea or 1.88 and 5.63 g casein (exp. 1) and 33.33 g oaten chaff with 1.04 casein or 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9 g urea or the mixture of the casein and urea (exp. 2). Concentrations of ruminal fluid ammonia increased with increasing nitrogenous supplements. Organic matter digestibility in sacco in the rumen was not different irrespective of N sources. Isoacids and valeric acid increased with increasing ingested casein but decreased with increasing urea intake. Peptide and amino acid pools in ruminal fluid increased with increasing ammonia concentrations (exp. 2) suggesting that proteolytic activity and transportation of peptides and amino acids across microbial membrane of rumen microbes may be regulated by the metabolite mechanism (intracellular amino acids and $NH_4{^+}$, respectively). Densities of total viable and cellulolytic bacteria in ruminal fluid increased with increasing ammonia levels but that of small Entodinia decreased. The density of fungal sporangia growth on oat leaf blades decreased with increasing ammonia concentrations but appeared to remain constant in the presence of casein. Efficiency of net microbial cell synthesis was 15-28% higher when ammonia concentrations increased from 100 to above 200 mg N/l regardless of N sources. In conclusion, supplementation of preformed protein had no effect on rumen digestion and microbial growth efficiency. This could not be accounted for its effect on ruminal fluid ammonia. Increased microbial growth efficiency with increasing ammonia levels may be due to a reduction in the turnover of microbial cells within the rumen.

Model for Estimating CO2 Concentration in Package Headspace of Microbiologically Perishable Food

  • Lee, Dong-Sun;Kim, Hwan-Ki;An, Duck-Soon;Yam, Kit L.
    • Preventive Nutrition and Food Science
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    • v.16 no.4
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    • pp.364-369
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    • 2011
  • Levels of carbon dioxide gas, a metabolite of microbial growth, have been reported to parallel the onset of microbial spoilage and may be used as a convenient index for a packaged food's shelf life. This study aimed to establish a kinetic model of $CO_2$ production from perishable food for the potential use for shelf life control in the food supply chain. Aerobic bacterial count and package $CO_2$ concentration were measured during the storage of seasoned pork meat at four temperatures (0, 5, 10 and $15^{\circ}C$), and their interrelationship was investigated to establish a mathematical model. The microbial growth at constant temperature was described by using model of Baranyi and Roberts. $CO_2$ production from the stored food could be explained by taking care of its yield and maintenance factors linked to the microbial growth. By establishing the temperature dependence of the microbial growth and $CO_2$ yield factor, $CO_2$ partial pressure or concentration in package headspace could be estimated to a limited extent, which is helpful for controlling the shelf life under constant and dynamic temperature conditions. Application and efficacy of the model needs to be improved with further refinement in the model.

Determination of Microbial Growth by Protein Assay in an Air-Cathode Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell

  • Li, Na;Kakarla, Ramesh;Moon, Jung Mi;Min, Booki
    • Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology
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    • v.25 no.7
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    • pp.1114-1118
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    • 2015
  • Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have gathered attention as a novel bioenergy technology to simultaneously treat wastewater with less sludge production than the conventional activated sludge system. In two different operations of the MFC and aerobic process, microbial growth was determined by the protein assay method and their biomass yields using real wastewater were compared. The biomass yield on the anode electrode of the MFC was 0.02 g-COD-cell/gCOD-substrate and the anolyte planktonic biomass was 0.14 g-COD-cell/g-COD-substrate. An MFC without anode electrode resulted in the biomass yield of 0.07 ± 0.03 g-COD-cell/g-CODsubstrate, suggesting that oxygen diffusion from the cathode possibly supported the microbial growth. In a comparative test, the biomass yield under aerobic environment was 0.46 ± 0.07 g-COD-cell/g-COD-substrate, which was about 3 times higher than the total biomass value in the MFC operation.