• Title, Summary, Keyword: negative facial emotion processing

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Effects of Working Memory Load on Negative Facial Emotion Processing: an ERP study (작업기억 부담이 부적 얼굴정서 처리에 미치는 영향: ERP 연구)

  • Park, Taejin;Kim, Junghee
    • Korean Journal of Cognitive Science
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    • v.29 no.1
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    • pp.39-59
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    • 2018
  • To elucidate the effect of working memory (WM) load on negative facial emotion processing, we examined ERP components (P1 and N170) elicited by fearful and neutral expressions each of which was presented during 0-back (low-WM load) or 2-back (high-WM load) tasks. During N-back tasks, visual objects were presented one by one as targets and each of facial expressions was presented as a passively observed stimulus during intervals between targets. Behavioral results showed more accurate and fast responses at low-WM load condition compared to high-WM load condition. Analysis of mean amplitudes of P1 on the occipital region showed significant WM load effect (high-WM load > low-WM load) but showed nonsignificant facial emotion effect. Analysis of mean amplitudes of N170 on the posterior occipito-temporal region showed significant overall facial emotion effect (fearful > neutral), but, in detail, significant facial emotion effect was observed only at low-WM load condition on the left hemisphere, but was observed at high-WM load condition as well as low-WM load condition on the right hemisphere. To summarize, facial emotion effect observed by N170 amplitudes was modulated by WM load only on the left hemisphere. These results show that early emotional processing of negative facial expression could be eliminated or reduced by high load of WM on the left hemisphere, but could not be eliminated by high load on the right hemisphere, and suggest right hemispheric lateralization of negative facial emotion processing.

Difficulty in Facial Emotion Recognition in Children with ADHD (주의력결핍 과잉행동장애의 이환 여부에 따른 얼굴표정 정서 인식의 차이)

  • An, Na Young;Lee, Ju Young;Cho, Sun Mi;Chung, Young Ki;Shin, Yun Mi
    • Journal of the Korean Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
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    • v.24 no.2
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    • pp.83-89
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    • 2013
  • Objectives : It is known that children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) experience significant difficulty in recognizing facial emotion, which involves processing of emotional facial expressions rather than speech, compared to children without ADHD. This objective of this study is to investigate the differences in facial emotion recognition between children with ADHD and normal children used as control. Methods : The children for our study were recruited from the Suwon Project, a cohort comprising a non-random convenience sample of 117 nine-year-old ethnic Koreans. The parents of the study participants completed study questionnaires such as the Korean version of Child Behavior Checklist, ADHD Rating Scale, Kiddie-Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia-Present and Lifetime Version. Facial Expression Recognition Test of the Emotion Recognition Test was used for the evaluation of facial emotion recognition and ADHD Rating Scale was used for the assessment of ADHD. Results : ADHD children (N=10) were found to have impaired recognition when it comes to Emotional Differentiation and Contextual Understanding compared with normal controls (N=24). We found no statistically significant difference in the recognition of positive facial emotions (happy and surprise) and negative facial emotions (anger, sadness, disgust and fear) between the children with ADHD and normal children. Conclusion : The results of our study suggested that facial emotion recognition may be closely associated with ADHD, after controlling for covariates, although more research is needed.

P3 Elicited by the Positive and Negative Emotional Stimuli (긍정적, 부정적 정서 자극에 의해 유발된 P3)

  • An, Suk-Kyoon;Lee, Soo-Jung;NamKoong, Kee;Lee, Chang-Il;Lee, Eun;Kim, The-Hoon;Roh, Kyo-Sik;Choi, Hye-Won;Park, Jun-Mo
    • Korean Journal of Psychosomatic Medicine
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    • v.9 no.2
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    • pp.143-152
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    • 2001
  • Objects : The aim of this study was to determine whether the P3 elicited by the negative emotional stimuli is different to that by positive stimuli. Methods : We measured the event-related potentials, especially P3 elicited by the facial photographs in 12 healthy subjects. Subjects were instructed to feel and respond to the rare target facial photographs imbedded in frequent non-target checkerboards. Results : We found that amplitude of P3 elicited by negative emotional photographs was significantly larger than that by the positive stimuli in healthy subjects. Conclusion : These findings suggest that P3 elicited by facial stimuli may be used as a psychophy-siological variable of the emotional processing.

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Different mechanism of visual attention in anxious and non-anxious population (부정자극 지각에 관련된 불안인과 정상인의 공간주의 비교연구)

  • Choi, Moon-Gee;Koo, Min-Mo;Park, Kun-Woo;Nam, Ki-Chun
    • Korean Journal of Cognitive Science
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    • v.20 no.1
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    • pp.51-77
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    • 2009
  • Using a modified Posner's cue-target paradigm, we investigated whether negative cues attract more attention than neutral cues in anxious people. Previous studies used commonly an unbalanced proportion of valid and invalid trials(75% vs. 25% respectively). But in the present study, an equivalent proportion of valid and invalids trials was used for measuring detection speed of cues without participant's expectancy caused by the unbalanced proportion. Emotional words(Experiment 1) and facial expressions(Experiment 2) were used as cues for target locations. The result of Experiment 1 and 2 showed that threatening cues facilitated target detection in valid trials and interfered with it in invalid trials in anxious participants and a, reverse response patterns were found in non-anxious participants. This indicates that threatening cues attract more attention to the cued location in anxious people and in contrast, non-anxious people avoid threatening stimuli. In Experiment 3, we investigated the difference of validity effect across anxiety levels. The results showed that anxious participants gave less attention to cued location when the cues were non-informative whereas non-anxious participants gave more attention to cued locations in the same condition. We discussed two kinds of cognitive bias caused by anxiety levels: attentional bias and proportion related bias.

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