• Title, Summary, Keyword: nuclear energy policy

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Study on the Change of Nuclear Energy Policy: Before and After Fukushima Nuclear Accident (원자력 정책 변동에 관한 연구: 후쿠시마 원전 사고 전후를 중심으로)

  • Park, Soo-Kyung;Jang, Dong-Hyun
    • The Journal of the Korea Contents Association
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    • v.19 no.6
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    • pp.222-235
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    • 2019
  • Since Fukushima nuclear disaster occurred in 2011, the nuclear energy policy of the international society has been in recession. However, In Korea, the nuclear-friendly policy had remained and even expanded over the last 60 years until the Park Geun-hye government. In other words, there was the path dependence of nuclear energy policy. Since the Moon Jae-in government that pledged to perform nuclear phase-out policy in 2017 was inaugurated, the nuclear-friendly policy began to swerve from the course of path dependence. Based on the mai logic of historical institutionalism, this study looked into the change of Korean nuclear policy by before and after the Fukushima nuclear accident. As the result of this research, the external situation of Fukushima Nuclear Accident became a critical turning point and led to a change in the government's policy on nuclear power. From an institutional perspective, it influenced the paradigm of nuclear power policy, policy decision structure, and laws of nuclear power. From a doer's perspective, it influenced political idea and social acceptability. Since Moon Jae-in government was inaugurated in 2017, nuclear phase-out policy has secured its institutional foundation and nuclear power policy has basically changed from nuclear-friendly policy to nuclear phase-out policy. Therefore, the energy policy of Moon Jae-in government gets out of the nuclear power based path dependency that previous governments pursued, keeps punctuated equilibrium, and changes to renewable energy oriented policy.

The Impact of the Great East Japan Earthquake and Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident on People's Perception of Disaster Risks and Attitudes Toward Nuclear Energy Policy

  • Iwai, Noriko;Shishido, Kuniaki
    • Asian Journal for Public Opinion Research
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    • v.2 no.3
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    • pp.172-195
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    • 2015
  • Multiple nationwide opinion surveys, carried out by the government (cabinet office), major media (national newspapers and NHK), the National Institute for Environmental Studies, and the Atomic Energy Society of Japan, have revealed that the Fukushima nuclear accident has heightened people's perception of disaster risks, fear of nuclear accidents, and increased recognition of pollution issues, and has changed public opinion on nuclear energy policy. The opinion gap on nuclear energy policy between specialists and lay people has widened since the disaster. The results of the Japanese General Social Survey data show that objections to the promotion of nuclear energy are strong among females, and weaker among young males and the supporters of the LDP. These findings are similar to the data collected after the Chernobyl accident. People who live in a 70km radius of nuclear plants tend to evaluate nuclear disaster risks higher. Distance from nuclear plants and the perception of earthquake risk interactively correlate with opinions on nuclear issues. Among people whose evaluation of earthquake risk is low, those who live nearer to the plants are more likely to object to the abolishment of nuclear plants. It was also found that the nuclear disaster has changed people's behavior; they now try to save electricity. The level of commitment to energy saving is found to relate to opinions on nuclear issues.

Strengthening the Sustainability of the Nuclear Energy Policy System in Korea (원자력행정체제의 지속가능성 강화방안)

  • Choi, Young-Chool
    • Korean System Dynamics Review
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    • v.10 no.1
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    • pp.109-129
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    • 2009
  • This paper explores the ways by which the authority concerned with nuclear energy policy-making in Korea can strengthen its organisational sustainability from long-term perspective. In doing so, it applies the system dynamics approach to predict what would happen to the organisational sustainability of the nuclear energy authority in the future. In the process of analysis, it also draws causal loop map of components contained in the simulation model and constructs user-interface simulation model. It shows different predicted future values regarding organisational sustainability of the nuclear energy authority in Korea and puts forward some policy implications for practitioners and academics involved in nuclear energy policy.

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Policymakers and stakeholders' perceptions of science-driven nuclear energy policy

  • Li, Nan;Brossard, Dominique;Scheufele, Dietram A.;Wilson, Paul P.H.
    • Nuclear Engineering and Technology
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    • v.50 no.5
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    • pp.773-779
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    • 2018
  • This study surveyed 137 policymakers and key stakeholders (e.g., employees of government agencies, academic institutions, nonprofit organizations, industry, and advocacy groups) involved in making decisions on nuclear energy policy, investigating how they differentially perceived the importance of scientific evidence in driving nuclear policy. We also identified the policy areas that each group of decision-makers are mostly concerned about and showed how such concerns might contextualize and ultimately shape their perceptions of science-driven policy.

A policy analysis of nuclear safety culture and security culture in East Asia: Examining best practices and challenges

  • Trajano, Julius Cesar Imperial
    • Nuclear Engineering and Technology
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    • v.51 no.6
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    • pp.1696-1707
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    • 2019
  • This paper conducts a qualitative policy analysis of current challenges to safety culture and security culture in Southeast Asia and emerging best practices in Northeast Asia that are aimed at strengthening both cultures. It analyses lessons, including strengths and limitations, that can be derived from Northeast Asian states, given the long history of nuclear energy in South Korea, China and Japan. It identifies and examines best practices from Northeast Asia's Nuclear Security Centres of Excellence in terms of boosting nuclear security culture and their relevance for Southeast Asia. The paper accentuates the important role of the State in adopting policy and regulatory frameworks and in institutionalising nuclear education and training programmes to deepen the safety-security cultures. Best practices in and challenges to developing a nuclear safety culture and a security culture in East Asia are examined using three frameworks of analysis (i) a comprehensive nuclear policy framework; (ii) a proactive and independent regulatory body; and (iii) holistic nuclear education and training programmes. The paper argues that Southeast Asian states interested in harnessing nuclear energy and/or utilising radioactive sources for non-power applications must develop a comprehensive policy framework on developing safety and security cultures, a proactive regulatory body, and holistic nuclear training programmes that cover both technical and human factors. Such measures are crucial in order to mitigate human errors that may lead to radiological accidents and nuclear security crises. Key lessons from Japan, South Korea and China such as best practices and challenges can inform policy recommendations for Southeast Asia in enhancing safety-security cultures.

Policy implication of nuclear energy's potential for energy optimization and CO2 mitigation: A case study of Fujian, China

  • Peng, Lihong;Zhang, Yi;Li, Feng;Wang, Qian;Chen, Xiaochou;Yu, Ang
    • Nuclear Engineering and Technology
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    • v.51 no.4
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    • pp.1154-1162
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    • 2019
  • China is undertaking an energy reform from fossil fuels to clean energy to accomplish $CO_2$ intensity (CI) reduction commitments. After hydropower, nuclear energy is potential based on breadthwise comparison with the world and analysis of government energy consumption (EC) plan. This paper establishes a CI energy policy response forecasting model based on national and provincial EC plans. This model is then applied in Fujian Province to predict its CI from 2016 to 2020. The result shows that CI declines at a range of 43%-53% compared to that in 2005 considering five conditions of economic growth in 2020. Furthermore, Fujian will achieve the national goals in advance because EC is controlled and nuclear energy ratio increased to 16.4% (the proportion of non-fossil in primary energy is 26.7%). Finally, the development of nuclear energy in China and the world are analyzed, and several policies for energy optimization and CI reduction are proposed.

The role of tolerance and self-sufficiency in a nation's adoption of nuclear power generation: A search for a quick and simple indicator

  • Roh, Seungkook
    • Nuclear Engineering and Technology
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    • v.51 no.3
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    • pp.904-907
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    • 2019
  • Nuclear energy remains one of the world's major energy sources, making up over 10% of global electricity generation in 2017. Public acceptance of nuclear energy is essential for its adoption. From a practical perspective, it is beneficial to have a simple indicator that can predict the actual adoption of nuclear energy. Based on practical experience, the authors suggest tolerance and self-sufficiency as potential indicators that may predict the adoption of nuclear energy. By evaluating the cross-sectional data of 18 countries in 2013, this research assesses the actual impact of tolerance and self-sufficiency on public acceptance in order to identify the validity of the two variables. The results indicate that the two variables are statistically significant, while public acceptance is insignificant in explaining national adoption of nuclear energy. This may be because tolerance reflects national willingness to accept potential risk, while self-sufficiency explains a government's likelihood of developing non-carbon energy sources.

Nuclear Safety: A Longitudinal Case Study from the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster (후쿠시마 원전사고 종적사례연구를 통한 원전에너지 안전성 고찰)

  • Lee, Joon-Hyuk;Jin, Young-Min;Jo, Young-Hyuk;Lee, Soon-Hong
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Safety
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    • v.31 no.1
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    • pp.139-147
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    • 2016
  • Nuclear energy is considerably cheap and clean compared to other fossil fuels. Yet, there are rising safety concerns of nuclear power plants including the possibility of radiation releasing nuclear accidents. In light of the Fukushima nuclear crisis in 2011, Japan has been re-evaluating their existing energy policies and increasing the share of alternative energy. This paper first tracks the major historical changes of energy policy in Japan by time period. Next, energy security, reignited concerns and alternative energy are covered to examine Japan's energy security situation and its transition after the Fukushima disaster. Lastly, a short survey based on thematic analysis was conducted in South Korea and Japan to understand the public awareness of nuclear. This paper postulates that the case of Fukushima will contribute to establish and operate a safe-future nuclear program in South Korea, given that the country is not only geographically neighbouring Japan but also the world's fourth largest producer of nuclear energy.

Challenges in Green Innovation Policy after the Fukushima Nuclear Accident

  • Wada, Tomoaki
    • STI Policy Review
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    • v.4 no.1
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    • pp.135-161
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    • 2013
  • This paper examines Japan's Science and Technology (S&T) Basic Plans in accordance with its S&T Basic Law. The Basic Plans promote two major innovation (Green Innovation and Life Innovation) towards the creation of new markets and jobs, specifically under the Fourth S&T Basic Plan enacted on August 2011. Successful smart community demonstration projects at four urban localities were launched under plans to promote Green Innovation research and development of renewable energy technologies. However, the expectation that renewable energy such as solar or wind power can replace nuclear power is not backed by sufficient evidence. Furthermore, the electricity produced by these sources is expensive and unstable owing to its reliance on weather conditions. The Fukushima nuclear power plant accident on March 2011 has also seriously affected Japan's future energy plans. According to a government estimate, electricity charges would double if nuclear power generation were abandoned, imposing a heavy burden on the Japanese economy. Japan is in need of energy policies designed on the basis of more far-sighted initiatives.

An Analysis on Korean Nuclear Power's Contribution to the GHG Emission Reduction and the Economic Effect (한국 원자력발전의 온실가스 저감 기여도 및 경제적 효과 분석)

  • Cho, Byung-Oke;Kim, Shin-Jong;Kim, Jum-Su
    • Journal of Energy Engineering
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    • v.19 no.4
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    • pp.203-214
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    • 2010
  • This study is to assess the reduction of greenhouse gas emission and economic contribution by operating nuclear power plants in Korea. According to the results of applying greenhouse gas emission coefficients to the current nuclear power generation and the estimated nuclear power generation of national energy master plan, it is confirmed quantitatively that nuclear power contributes to reducing greenhouse gas emission, controlling inflation, and substituting import of fossil energies. For the reliable and cost-effective supply of energy and the active respondency to climate change, a continuous expansion of nuclear power is implied to be necessary.