• Title, Summary, Keyword: public opinion survey

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The Infrastructure of Public Opinion Research in Japan

  • Kubota, Yuichi
    • Asian Journal for Public Opinion Research
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    • v.1 no.1
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    • pp.42-60
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    • 2013
  • This article introduces the infrastructure of public opinion research in Japan by reviewing the development of polling organizations and the current situation of social surveys. In Japan, the polling infrastructure developed through the direction and encouragement of the U.S. occupation authorities. In the early 1969s, however, survey researchers began to conduct their own original polls in not only domestic but also cross-national contexts. An exploration of recent survey trends reveals that polling organizations tended to conduct more surveys during summer, in the mid-range of sample size (1,000-2,999), based on random sampling (response rates of 40-50%), and through the mail between April 2011 and March 2012. The media was the most active polling sector.

Testing the Representativeness of a Multimode Survey in South Korea: Results from KAMOS

  • Cho, Sung Kyum;LoCascio, Sarah Prusoff;Lee, Kay-O;Jang, Deok-Hyun;Lee, Jong Min
    • Asian Journal for Public Opinion Research
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    • v.4 no.2
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    • pp.73-87
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    • 2017
  • The Korean Academic Multimode Open Survey (KAMOS) is a national survey first conducted in 2016. Stratified cluster random sampling was used in an initial face-to-face survey during which panel members were recruited. The second survey allowed invited panel members to answer online or by phone. KAMOS includes both longitudinal items and omnibus items, i.e., researchers can propose questions to include on KAMOS. This paper seeks to establish that KAMOS is representative of the South Korean adult population. The demographic variables from the first survey were comparable to demographic variables from two well-respected surveys in South Korea: the KOSTAT Social Survey and the Gallup Korea Omnibus Survey. To ensure that there was no substantial difference between those who answered the first survey and those who answered the second survey, we compared the results of 22 items from the first survey. The 2,000 panel members who were invited to participate in the second survey had similar responses to the 1,008 of those who responded to the second survey. Based on our findings, KAMOS can be considered a representative sample.

The Impact of the Great East Japan Earthquake and Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident on People's Perception of Disaster Risks and Attitudes Toward Nuclear Energy Policy

  • Iwai, Noriko;Shishido, Kuniaki
    • Asian Journal for Public Opinion Research
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    • v.2 no.3
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    • pp.172-195
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    • 2015
  • Multiple nationwide opinion surveys, carried out by the government (cabinet office), major media (national newspapers and NHK), the National Institute for Environmental Studies, and the Atomic Energy Society of Japan, have revealed that the Fukushima nuclear accident has heightened people's perception of disaster risks, fear of nuclear accidents, and increased recognition of pollution issues, and has changed public opinion on nuclear energy policy. The opinion gap on nuclear energy policy between specialists and lay people has widened since the disaster. The results of the Japanese General Social Survey data show that objections to the promotion of nuclear energy are strong among females, and weaker among young males and the supporters of the LDP. These findings are similar to the data collected after the Chernobyl accident. People who live in a 70km radius of nuclear plants tend to evaluate nuclear disaster risks higher. Distance from nuclear plants and the perception of earthquake risk interactively correlate with opinions on nuclear issues. Among people whose evaluation of earthquake risk is low, those who live nearer to the plants are more likely to object to the abolishment of nuclear plants. It was also found that the nuclear disaster has changed people's behavior; they now try to save electricity. The level of commitment to energy saving is found to relate to opinions on nuclear issues.

Perceptions of the Public on Women's Education and Employment: Evidence from the World Values Survey, 2016

  • Dom, Vannak;Yi, Gihong
    • Asian Journal for Public Opinion Research
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    • v.5 no.4
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    • pp.302-318
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    • 2018
  • This study is an attempt to explore the perceptions of the public on women in higher education and employment, using data from the World Value Survey, had 90,350 respondents, of which 48.03% are male (N=43,391) and 51.87% are female (N=46,878). This study indicated that women, younger people, upper class people, religious people, and married people are more likely to have strong views against women's education and employment.

A Trend Review of Public Opinion Quarterly in the 1990s ($\ll$계간여론조사$\gg$에 실린 논문들의 성격과 경향)

  • 구자숙;김은미;이현희
    • Survey Research
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    • v.2 no.2
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    • pp.1-16
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    • 2001
  • This paper intends to provide some guidelines for the articles to be published in Survey Research. For that purpose, we review the research articles published in Public Opinion Quarterly in 1991, 1995, and 2000. and identify the characteristics and the analytical methods and data used in these researches. Articles in Public Opinion Quarterly have some implications to the Korean survey research community in such a way that the types of researches to improve survey qualities and meta analyses of previously conducted survey researches seem to be the most useful and necessary at present.

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Is Simple Random Sampling Better than Quota Sampling? An Analysis Based on the Sampling Methods of Three Surveys in South Korea

  • Cho, Sung Kyum;Jang, Deok-Hyun;LoCascio, Sarah Prusoff
    • Asian Journal for Public Opinion Research
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    • v.3 no.4
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    • pp.156-175
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    • 2016
  • This paper considers whether random sampling always produces more accurate survey results in the case of South Korea. We compare information from the 2010 census to the demographic variables of three public opinion surveys from South Korea: Gallup Korea's Omnibus Survey (Survey A) is conducted every two months by Gallup Korea; the annual Social Survey (Survey B) is conducted by Statistics Korea (KOSTAT); the Korean General Social Survey (KGSS or Survey C) is conducted annually by the Survey Research Center (SRC) at Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU). Survey A uses quota sampling after randomly selecting the neighborhood and initial addresses; Survey B uses random sampling, but allows replacements in some situations; Survey C uses simple random sampling. Data from more than one year was used for each survey. Our analysis suggests that Survey B is the most representative in most respects, and, in some respects, Survey A may be more representative than Survey C. Data from Survey C was the least stable in terms of representativeness by geographical area and age. Single-person households were underrepresented in both Surveys A and C, but the problem was more severe in Survey A. Four-person households and married persons were both over-represented in Survey A. Less educated people were under-represented in both Survey A and Survey C. There were differences in income level between Survey A and Survey C, but income data was not available for Survey B or the census, so it is difficult to ascertain which survey was more representative in this case.

Content Analysis on Newspaper Public Opinion Survey - The 17th Presidential Election of Korea -

  • Choi, Kyung-Ho
    • Journal of the Korean Data and Information Science Society
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    • v.19 no.2
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    • pp.431-441
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    • 2008
  • A public opinion poll's importance is at this time increasing now. Especially, a news report with a fair and objective execution and investigative reporting Moral Code is very important. But a research on the basis of investigative reporting Moral Code is not yet carried out. In this paper, with the center of a public opinion poll involved in the 17th Presidential Election of Korea, investigative reporting Moral Code has been analyzed measurably how well observed in the Press. Furthermore, it has been compared with findings carried out in the year 2002. Finally, through comparing response rate with actual results acquired in a survey of public opinion, I proposed a response rate acquisition.

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The Fukushima Nuclear Accident and Environmental Risk: A Survey of Fukushima Residents

  • Miyawaki, Takeshi;Sasaoka, Shinya
    • Asian Journal for Public Opinion Research
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    • v.5 no.1
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    • pp.1-14
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    • 2017
  • The Fukushima nuclear accident caused by an earthquake and a subsequent tsunami on March 11, 2011 has seriously impacted the environment surrounding the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. While all the residents near the plant were evacuated from the area deemed uninhabitable after the accident, residents of the neighboring area outside of the evacuation zone still seem to live in fear of invisible radiation. To understand Fukushima residents' thinking about the environmental risks that accompany a nuclear disaster, we utilize a poll of the residents of Fukushima conducted in 2013. Based on the survey data, we reveal factors that seem to strongly affect their knowledge and concerns about nuclear power plants. The results of the multivariate analysis show the importance of the following two factors: (1) confidence in mass media, and (2) trust in institutions in charge of administering the accident, especially the central government, the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency, and Tokyo Electric Power Company. We conclude that the more people trust mass media and particular institutions, the more likely it is that they are have an elevated sense of anxiety and fear of the presence of nuclear plants.