• Title, Summary, Keyword: repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation

Search Result 31, Processing Time 0.057 seconds

Effects of Motor Imagery Practice in Conjunction with Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Stroke Patients

  • Ji, Sang-Goo;Cha, Hyun-Gyu;Kim, Ki-Jong;Kim, Myoung-Kwon
    • Journal of Magnetics
    • /
    • v.19 no.2
    • /
    • pp.181-184
    • /
    • 2014
  • The aim of the present study was to examine whether motor imagery (MI) practice in conjunction with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) applied to stroke patients could improve theirgait ability. This study was conducted with 29 subjects diagnosed with hemiparesis due to stroke.The experimental group consisted of 15 members who were performed MI practice in conjunction with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, while the control group consisted of 14 members who were performed MI practice and sham therapy. Both groups received traditional physical therapy for 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week, for 6 weeks; additionally, they received mental practice for 15 minutes. The experimental group was instructed to perform rTMS and the control group was instructed to apply sham stimulation for 15 minutes. Gait analysis was performed using a three-dimensional motion capture system, which is a real-time tracking device that delivers data via infrared reflective markers using six cameras. Results showed that the velocity, step length, and cadence of both groups were significantly improved after the practice (p<0.05). Significant differences were found between the groups in velocity and cadence (p<0.05) as well as with respect to the change rate (p<0.05) after practice. The results showed that MI practice in conjunction with rTMS is more effective in improving gait ability than MI practice alone.

The Effects of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on the Gait of Acute Stroke Patients

  • Ji, Sang-Goo;Kim, Myoung-Kwon
    • Journal of Magnetics
    • /
    • v.20 no.2
    • /
    • pp.129-132
    • /
    • 2015
  • The aim of the present study was to examine whether repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can improve gait ability of acute stage stroke patients. This study was conducted with 39 subjects who were diagnosed as having a hemiparesis due to stroke. The experimental group included 20 subjects who underwent repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and the control group included 19 subjects who underwent sham therapy. The stroke patients in the experimental group underwent conventional rehabilitation therapy and rTMS was applied daily to the hotspot of the lesional hemisphere. The stroke patients in the control group underwent sham rTMS and conventional rehabilitation therapy. Participants in both groups received therapy five days per week for four weeks. Temporospatial gait characteristics, such as stance phase, swing phase, step length in affected side, velocity, and cadence, were assessed before and after the four week therapy period. A significant difference was observed in post-treatment gains for the step length in the affected side, velocity, and cadence between the experimental group and control group ( p < 0.05). However, no significant differences were observed between the two groups on stance phase and swing phase ( p > 0.05). We conclude that rTMS may be beneficial in improving the effects of acute stage stroke on gait ability.

Effects of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Enhancement of Cognitive Function in Focal Ischemic Stroke Rat Model (국소 허혈성 뇌졸중 모델 흰쥐의 인지기능에 반복경두개자기자극이 미치는 효과)

  • Lee, Jung-In;Kim, Gye-Yeop;Nam, Ki-Won;Lee, Dong-Woo;Kim, Ki-Do;Kim, Kyung-Yoon
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Physical Medicine
    • /
    • v.7 no.1
    • /
    • pp.11-20
    • /
    • 2012
  • Purpose : This study is intended to examine the repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on cognitive function in the focal ischemic stroke rat model. Methods : This study selected 30 Sprague-Dawley rats of 8 weeks. The groups were divided into two groups and assigned 15 rats to each group. Control group: Non-treatment after injured by focal ischemic stroke; Experimental group: application of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation(0.1 Tesla, 25 Hz, 20 min/time, 2 times/day, 5 days/2 week) after injured by focal ischemic stroke. To assess the effect of rTMS, the passive avoidance test, spatial learning and memory ability test were analyzed at the pre, 1 day, $7^{th}$ day, $14^{th}$ day and immunohistochemistric response of BDNF were analyzed in the hippocampal dentate gyrus at $7^{th}$ day, $14^{th}$ day. Results : In passive avoidance test, the outcome of experimental group was different significantly than the control group at the $7^{th}$ day, $14^{th}$ day. In spatial learning and memory ability test, the outcome of experimental group was different significantly than the control group at the $7^{th}$ day, $14^{th}$ day. In immunohistochemistric response of BDNF in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, experimental groups was more increased than control group. Conclusion : These result suggest that improved cognitive function by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation after focal ischemic stroke is associated with dynamically altered expression of BDNF in hippocampal dentate gyrus and that is related with synaptic plasticity.

The Application of Brain Stimulation in Psychiatric Disorders : An Overview (정신질환에서 뇌자극술의 적용)

  • Roh, Daeyoung;Kang, Lee Young;Kim, Do Hoon
    • Korean Journal of Biological Psychiatry
    • /
    • v.24 no.4
    • /
    • pp.167-174
    • /
    • 2017
  • Based on advances in biotechnology and neuroscience, neuromodulation is poised to gain clinical importance as a treatment modality for psychiatric disorders. In addition to old-established electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), clinicians are expected to understand newer forms of neurostimulation, such as deep brain stimulation (DBS), vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS). Given the growing interest in non-invasive neuromodulation technologies, clinicians may seek sufficient information about neuromodulation to inform their clinical practice. A growing literature suggests that applications of non-invasive neuromodulation have evidence particularly for indications where treatments are currently insufficient, such as drug-resistant depression. However, positive neuromodulation studies require replication, and the precise interactions among stimulation, antidepressant medication, and psychotherapy are unknown. Further studies of long-term safety and the impact on the developing brain are needed. Non-invasive neuromodulatory devices could enable more individualized treatment. However, do-it-yourself (DIY) stimulation kits require a better understanding of the effects of more frequent patterns of stimulation and raise concerns about clinical supervision, regulation, and reimbursement. Wide spread enthusiasm for therapeutic potential of neuromodulation in clinical practice settings should be mitigated by the fact that there are still research gaps and challenges associated with non-invasive neuromodulatory devices.

Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Combined with Task Oriented Training to Improve Upper Extremity Function After Stroke

  • Kim, Myoung-Kwon
    • Journal of Magnetics
    • /
    • v.19 no.2
    • /
    • pp.170-173
    • /
    • 2014
  • The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in conjunction with task oriented training, on cortical excitability and upper extremity function recovery in stroke patients. This study was conducted with 31 subjects who were diagnosed as a hemiparesis by stroke. Participants in the experimental (16 members) and control groups (15 members) received rTMS and sham rTMS, respectively, during a 10 minutes session, five days per week for four weeks, followed by task oriented training during a 30 minutes session, five days per week for four weeks. Motor cortex excitability was performed by motor evoked potential and upper limb function was evaluated by motor function test. Both groups showed a significant increment in motor function test and amplitude, latency in motor evoked potential compared to pre-intervention (p < 0.05). A significant difference in post-training gains for the motor function test, amplitude in motor evoked potential was observed between the experimental group and the control group (p < 0.05). The findings of the current study demonstrated that incorporating rTMS in task oriented training may be beneficial in improving the effects of stroke on upper extremity function recovery.

Effects of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Motor Recovery in Lower Extremities of Subacute Stage Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial

  • Ji, Sang-Goo;Cha, Hyun-Gyu;Kim, Myoung-Kwon
    • Journal of Magnetics
    • /
    • v.20 no.4
    • /
    • pp.427-431
    • /
    • 2015
  • The aim of this study was to investigate whether repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can improve motor recovery in the lower extremities of the patients with subacute stage spinal cord injury (SCI). This study was conducted with 19 subjects diagnosed with paraplegia because of SCI. The experimental group included 10 subjects who underwent active rTMS, and the control group included 9 subjects who underwent sham rTMS. The SCI patients in the experimental group underwent conventional rehabilitation therapy, and active rTMS was applied daily to the hotspot of the lesional hemisphere. The SCI patients in the control group underwent sham rTMS and conventional rehabilitation therapy. The participants in both the groups received therapy five days per week for six weeks. Latency, amplitude, and velocity were assessed before and after the six-week therapy period. A significant difference in post-treatment gains for the latency and velocity was observed between the experimental and control groups (p < 0.05). However, no significant differences in the amplitude were observed between the two groups (p > 0.05). The results of this study indicate that rTMS may be beneficial in improving motor recovery in the lower extremities of subacute stage SCI patients.

The Effects of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Balance Ability in Acute Stroke Patients

  • Ji, Sang-Goo;Shin, Young-Jun;Kim, Myoung-Kwon
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Physical Medicine
    • /
    • v.11 no.3
    • /
    • pp.11-17
    • /
    • 2016
  • PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to determine whether high frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can improve balance ability in acute stage stroke patients. METHODS: The study was conducted on 30 subjects diagnosed with hemiparesis caused by stroke. The experimental group consisted of 15 patients that underwent rTMS for 15 mins and the control group consisted of 15 patients that underwent sham rTMS (for 15 minutes). A 70-mm figure 8 coil and a Magstim Rapid stimulator was used in both groups. Patients in the experimental group received 10 Hz rTMS applied to the hotspot in the lesioned hemisphere in 10-second trains with 50-second intervals between trains, for 15 minutes (total 2,000 pulses). Both groups received conventional physical therapy for 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week, for 4 weeks. Static balance ability analysis was performed using the Gaitview system to measure pressure rate, postural sway, and total pressure, and dynamic balance ability analysis was performed to measure pressure variables using a balance system. RESULTS: A significant difference was observed in post-training gains for pressure rate, total pressure in static balance, and overall stability index in dynamic balance between the experimental group and the control group (p<.05). CONCLUSION: The results of this study indicate that high frequency rTMS may be beneficial for improving static and dynamic balance recovery in acute stroke patients.

Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation to Treat Depression and Insomnia with Chronic Low Back Pain

  • Park, Eun Jung;Lee, Se Jin;Koh, Do Yle;Han, Yoo Mi
    • The Korean Journal of Pain
    • /
    • v.27 no.3
    • /
    • pp.285-289
    • /
    • 2014
  • Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a noninvasive and safe technique for motor cortex stimulation. TMS is used to treat neurological and psychiatric disorders, including mood and movement disorders. TMS can also treat several types of chronic neuropathic pain. The pain relief mechanism of cortical stimulation is caused by modifications in neuronal excitability. Depression is a common co-morbidity with chronic pain. Pain and depression should be treated concurrently to achieve a positive outcome. Insomnia also frequently occurs with chronic lower back pain. Several studies have proposed hypotheses for TMS pain management. Herein, we report two cases with positive results for the treatment of depression and insomnia with chronic low back pain by TMS.

Neurophysiological Evaluation of the Motor System Using Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (뇌자기자극을 이용한 운동신경계의 신경생리학적 평가)

  • Shin, Hae-Won;Sohn, Young-H.
    • Annals of Clinical Neurophysiology
    • /
    • v.13 no.1
    • /
    • pp.1-12
    • /
    • 2011
  • Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive tool used to study aspects of human brain physiology, including motor function and the pathophysiology of various brain disorders. A brief electric current passed through a magnetic coil produces a high-intensity magnetic field, which can excite or inhibit the cerebral cortex. Although various brain regions can be evaluated by TMS, most studies have focused on the motor cortex where motor evoked potentials (MEPs) are produced. Single-pulse and paired-pulse TMS can be used to measure the excitability of the motor cortex via various parameters, while repetitive TMS induces cortical plasticity via long-term potentiation or long-term depression-like mechanisms. Therefore, TMS is useful in the evaluation of physiological mechanisms of various neurological diseases, including movement disorders and epilepsy. In addition, it has diagnostic utility in spinal cord diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and demyelinating diseases. The therapeutic effects of repetitive TMS on stroke, Parkinson disease and focal hand dystonia are limited since the duration and clinical benefits seem to be temporary. New TMS techniques, which may improve clinical utility, are being developed to enhance clinical utilities in various neurological diseases.

Effects of Mental Practice in Conjunction with Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on the Upper Limbs of Sub-acute Stroke Patients

  • Ji, Sang-Goo;Kim, Myoung-Kwon;Cha, Hyun-Gyu
    • Journal of Magnetics
    • /
    • v.19 no.4
    • /
    • pp.353-356
    • /
    • 2014
  • The aim of the present study was to examine whether mental practice (MP) in conjunction with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can improve the upper limb function of sub-acute stroke patients. This study was conducted with 32 subjects who were diagnosed with hemiparesis by stroke. The experimental group consisted of 16 members upon each of whom was performed MP in conjunction with rTMS, whreas the control group consisted of 16 members upon each of whom was performed MP and sham rTMS. Both groups received traditional physical therapy for 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week, for 6 weeks; additionally, they received mental practice for 15 minutes a day. The experimental group was instructed to perform rTMS, and the control group was instructed to apply sham rTMS for 15 minutes. A motor cortex excitability analysis was performed by motor evoked potentials (MEPs), and upper limb function was evaluated by Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) and the Box and Block test (BBT). Results showed that the amplitude, latency, FMA, and BBT of the experimental group and the latency, FMA, and BBT of the control group were significantly improved after the experiment (p<0.05). Significant differences were found between the groups in amplitude and latency after the experiment (p<0.05). The results showed that MP in conjunction with rTMS is more effective in improving upper limb function than MP alone.