• Title, Summary, Keyword: seafood byproducts

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Application of Membrane Bioreactor Technology for the Development of Bioactive Substances from Seafood Processing Byproducts

  • Kim, Se-Kwon;Mendis, Eresha
    • Journal of Marine Bioscience and Biotechnology
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    • v.1 no.1
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    • pp.9-21
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    • 2006
  • Foods and related substances from diverse sources known to have a potential for disease risk reduction are called functional foods, while nutraceuticals are bioactive compounds isolated from food and sold in dosage form. Nutraceutical and functional food industries are rapidly growing in recent years and most of the cases development of these functional materials involves certain biotransformation processes. A number of bioactive compounds has been identified up to date and isolated from seafood related products through enzyme-mediated hydrolysis. The enzymatic bioconversion process require suitable biocatalysts and appropriate bioreactor systems to incubate byproducts with digestive enzymes. Membrane bioreactor technology is recently emerging for the development of bioactive compounds from seafood processing byproducts.

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Improvement on Yield of Extracts from Byproducts of Alaska Pollock Theragra chalcogramma and Sea Tangle Laminaria japonica using Commercial Enzymes and Its Food Component Characterization (상업적 효소를 이용한 명태(Theragra chalcogramma) 두부 및 정형 다시마(Laminaria japonica) 부산물 유래 고압 추출물의 수율개선 및 이의 식품성분 특성)

  • Noh, Yuni;Park, Kwon Hyun;Lee, Ji Sun;Kim, Hyeon Jeong;Kim, Min Ji;Kim, Ki Hyun;Kim, Jeong Gyun;Heu, Min Soo;Kim, Jin-Soo
    • Korean Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
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    • v.46 no.1
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    • pp.37-45
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    • 2013
  • This study was conducted to improve the yield of extracts from Alaska pollock Theragra chalcogramma head and sea tangle Laminaria japonica byproducts using various commercial enzymes, such as Alcalase, Flavourzyme, Neutrase (NH), and Protamex. Among the enzymatic hydrolysates, the yield was highest in hydrolysate incubated with NH for 4 h. NH-treated hydrolysates (NHH) also improved functional properties, such as angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryldrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, as compared to extracts from Alaska pollock head and sea tangle byproducts. Total free amino acid and taste values of NHH were 379.7 mg/100 mL and 24.03, respectively, after digestion for 4 h. These values are 2.2-fold and 1.9-fold higher compared with those of water soluble fractions extracted from Alaska pollock head and non-forming sea tangle, respectively. According to the taste value results, the major taste-active compounds among free amino acids of NHH were glutamic acid and aspartic acid. These results suggest that NHH can be used as an ingredient for natural seasoning preparation.

Preparation of Natural Seasoning using Enzymatic Hydrolysates from Byproducts of Alaska Pollock Theragra chalcogramma and Sea Tangle Laminaria japonica (명태(Theragra chalcogramma) 및 다시마(Laminaria japonica) 부산물 유래 효소 가수분해물을 이용한 천연 풍미 소재의 제조)

  • Kim, Jeong Gyun;Noh, Yuni;Park, Kwon Hyun;Lee, Ji Sun;Kim, Hyeon Jeong;Kim, Min Ji;Yoon, Moo Ho;Kim, Jin-Soo;Heu, Min Soo
    • Korean Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
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    • v.45 no.6
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    • pp.545-552
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    • 2012
  • This study developed a natural seasoning (NS) and characterized its food components. Hydrolysate from Alaska Pollock Theragra chalcogramma heads and sea tangle Laminaria japonica byproduct were obtained by incubating them with Neutrase for 4 h. NS was prepared by mixing sorbitol 2%, salt 2%, ginger powder 0.04%, garlic powder 0.2%, onion powder 0.2% and inosine monophosphate (IMP) 0.1% based on concentrated hydrolysates from Alaska pollock head and sea tangle byproduct before vaccum filtering. The proximate composition of NS was 82.7% moisture, 9.0% crude protein, and 5.1% ash. It had a higher crude protein content than commercial anchovy sauce (CS), it was lower in moisture and ash. The 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity and angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibiting activity of NS were 90.1% and 88.9%, respectively, which were superior to those of CS. The free amino acid content and total taste value of NS were 1,626.0 mg/100 mL and 165.86, respectively, which were higher than those of CS. According to the results of taste value, the major free amino acids were glutamic acid and aspartic acid. In the sensory evaluation, the color and taste of NS were superior to those of CS. No difference in fish odor between NS and CS was found.

Quality Characteristics of Accelerated Salt-fermented Anchovy Sauce Added with Shrimp Pandalus borealis, Byproducts (새우가공부산물을 이용한 속성 멸치액젓의 품질특성)

  • Kim, Jin-Soo;Kim, Hye-Suk;Yang, Soo-Kyeong;Park, Chan-Ho;Oh, Hyeon-Seok;Kang, Kyung-Tae;Ji, Seung-Gil;Heu, Min-Soo
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Food Science and Nutrition
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    • v.35 no.1
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    • pp.87-95
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    • 2006
  • Nutritional quality of accelerated salt-fermented anchovy sauce using shrimp processing byproduct as fermenting aids was characterized and compared with commercial anchovy sauce. Four types of sauces were fermented with 0 and $10\%$ addition of shrimp byproducts ($24{\pm}2^{\circ}C$, for 270 days), and 20 and $30\%$ addition of those ($24{\pm}2^{\circ}C$, for 180 days), respectively. Extractive nitrogen content (1,431 to 1,569 mg/100g) of anchovy sauces increased as additional ratios of shrimp byproduct increased. According to the results of ommission test, the taste of all anchovy sauces was influenced by the content of free amino acids, such as mainly glutamic acid and aspartic acid. Regardless of additional ratios of shrimp byproducts, all sauces were similar in total amino acid content ($9,848\~10,324$ mg/100 g), which were 2 times higher compared to that of the commercial sauce. Proline, valine and histidine contents of sauces tend to decrease as the additional ratios of shrimp byproducts increased, whereas methionine, isoleucine, leucine, phenylalanine and lysine contents increased. Increase of some amino acids and mineral content of sauces by increasing of additional ratios was due to release from shrimp byproducts. Sensory evaluation showed that scores of color, flavor and taste of the sauce added with $20\%$ shrimp byproducts_were significantly higher than those of other sauces (p<0.05). In the useful utilization aspects of seafood processing byproducts, shrimp byproducts were good resource for accelerated fermentation and nutritional improvement in preparation of fish sauce.

Preparation and Characteristics of Functional Sauce from Shrimp Byproducts (새우 부산물을 이용한 기능성 소스의 제조)

  • Heu, Min-Soo;Kang, Kyung-Tae;Kim, Hye-Suk;Yeum, Dong-Min;Lee, Tae-Gee;Park, Tae-Bong;Kim, Jin-Soo
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Food Science and Nutrition
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    • v.36 no.2
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    • pp.209-215
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    • 2007
  • The functional sauce from shrimp byproducts (heads, shells and tails) was prepared and examined for its characterization. The results of volatile basic nitrogen (VBN) suggested that shrimp byproducts were suitable materials for preparing functional sauce. The shrimp hydrolysate, which was incubated with Alcalase for 30 min, showed excellent yield and ACE inhibitory activity. The concentrated sauce from shrimp byproduct was high in crude protein, while low in VBN content and salinity when compared to commercial shrimp sauce. The total amino acid content (23,095.2 mg/100 mL) of concentrated sauce from shrimp byproduct was higher than that (4,582.5 mg/100 smL) of commercial shrimp sauce; also, the major amino acids were glutamic acid, aspartic acid, arginine and lysine. The free amino acid content and taste value of concentrated sauce from shrimp byproduct were 2,705.5 mg/100 mL and 81.0, respectively. The results on the taste value of concentrated sauce from shrimp byproducts suggested that the major taste active compounds among free amino acids were glutamic acid and aspartic acid.

Improvement on the Quality and Functionality of Skipjack Tuna Cooking Drip Using Commercial Enzymes (효소분해에 의한 참치 자숙액의 품질 및 기능성 개선)

  • Oh, Hyeun-Seok;Kim, Jin-Soo;Kim, Hye-Suk;Jee, Seung-Joon;Lee, Jae-Hyoung;Chung, In-Kwon;Kang, Kyung-Tae;Heu, Min-Soo
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Food Science and Nutrition
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    • v.36 no.7
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    • pp.881-888
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    • 2007
  • For the use of skipjack tuna cooking drip (STC) as a source of functional seasoning, the STC was hydrolyzed with various commercial enzymes, such as Alcalase, Flavourzyme, Neutrase and Protamex, and its hydrolysate was also investigated on the food component characteristics. The hydrolysate incubated with Alcalase for 30 min (HA30) showed 56.8% for angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and 1.18 for antioxidative activity, which were high or similar compared to the other enzymatic hydrolysates. There were no differences in ACE inhibitory activity and antioxidative activity among HA30, two-step enzymatic hydrolysates, and ultrafilterates (molecular weight cut off, 10 kDa). The HA30 was very stable on the digestive enzymes, such as chymotrypsin, pepsin, trypsin according to the TCA (trichloroacetic acid) soluble index. The results suggested that skipjack tuna cooking drip could be used as a source for preparing functional seasoning sauce.

Food Component Characteristics of Seafood Cooking Drips (수산 자숙액의 식품성분 특성)

  • Oh, Hyeun-Seok;Kang, Kyung-Tae;Kim, Hye-Suk;Lee, Jae-Hyoung;Jee, Seung-Joon;Ha, Jin-Hwan;Kim, Jin-Soo;Heu, Min-Soo
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Food Science and Nutrition
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    • v.36 no.5
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    • pp.595-602
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    • 2007
  • This study was conducted to investigate on food component characteristics of seafood cooking drips (skipjack tuna cooking drip, octopus cooking drip and oyster cooking drip) as a source of functional seasoning. Heavy metal contents of seafood cooking drips were below food safety level. Among seafood cooking drips concentrated to 5 folds, the crude protein content was the highest (18.1%) in skipjack tuna cooking drip (SCD). The free amino acid content and taste value were higher in SCD than in other seafood cooking drips, and the major free amino acids were glutamic acid and aspartic acid. Total amino acid content of SCD was 16.2 g/100 mL and the major amino acids were glutamic acid (11.9%), proline (9.2%), glycine (9.1%) and histidine (11.5%). SCD in comparison with other seafood cooking drips showed the highest angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity at $IC_{50}$ of 14.1 mg/mL. These results suggested that SCD could be used as a source of functional seasoning.

Genotoxicological Safety of the Ethanol Extract from Seafood Cooking Drips by Gamma Irradiation (감마선 조사한 수산 자숙액 에탄올 추출물의 유전독성학적 안전성 평가)

  • Kim, Hyun-Joo;Choi, Jong-il;Lee, Hee-Sub;Kim, Jae-Hun;Byun, Myung-Woo;Chun, Byung-Soo;Ahn, Dong-Hyun;Yook, Hong-Sun;Kim, Keehyuk;Lee, Ju-Woon
    • Journal of Radiation Industry
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    • v.2 no.1
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    • pp.21-26
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    • 2008
  • Although seafood cooking drips were the byproducts from the fishery industry it was known that the cooking drips had many nutrients and could be used as functional materials. Previously, the physiological properties of cooking drips were shown to be increased by a gamma irradiation. But, there was no report on the safe for the genotoxicity on the irradiation. In this study, the genotoxicity of the cooking drips from Hizikia fusiformis, Enteroctopus dofleni and Thunnus thynnus was evaluated by the Ames test (Salmonella typhimurium reversion assay) and the SOS chromotest. The results from all samples were negative in the bacterial reversion assay with S. typhimurium TA98, TA100. No mutagenicity was detected in the assay, both with and without metabolic activation. The SOS chromotest also indicated that the gamma-irradiated seafood cooking drips did not show any mutagenicity. Therefore, this study indicated that gamma irradiation could be used for the hygiene, functional properties and processibility of seafood cooking drips.

Distribution of Protease Inhibitors from Fish Eggs as Seafood Processing Byproducts (어류 알의 Protease Inhibitor 활성 분포)

  • Ji, Seong-Jun;Lee, Ji-Sun;Shin, Joon-Ho;Park, Kwon-Hyun;Kim, Jin-Soo;Kim, Kyoung-Sub;Heu, Min-Soo
    • Korean Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
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    • v.44 no.1
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    • pp.8-17
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    • 2011
  • To identify and examine the distribution of proteolytic inhibitory activity in crude extracts from fish eggs, and to determine the applicability of these protease inhibitors as anti-degradation agents in surimi-based products and fish meat, we compared the inhibitory activities of various extracts from fish eggs to those of commercial proteases, such as trypsin and papain. We used the optimal conditions for the screening of trypsin activity: 30 ug/uL of 0.1% trypsin and 0.6 mM Na-benzoyl-L-arginine-p-nitroanilide (BAPNA) with a pH of 8.0 at $40^{\circ}C$ for 60 min. The activities of papain and four commercial proteases were investigated after mixing with 100 ug/uL enzymes and 0.3% casein with a pH of 8.0 at $40^{\circ}C$ for 60 min. We performed a screening assay to detect the inhibitory activity (%) of crude extracts from eight species of fish eggs against the target proteases trypsin and papain. The assay revealed a wide distribution of trypsin and papain inhibitors in fish eggs. The specific inhibitory activities (11.6.28.6 U/mg) of crude extracts from fish eggs against trypsin and BAPNA substrate were higher than that (0.64 U/mg) of egg whites, used as a commercial inhibitor. The inhibitory activities of crude extracts from fish eggs against trypsin, and of egg whites against casein substrate (1.94.4.51 U/mg), were higher than those of papain (0.24.1.57 U/mg) and commercial protease (0.04.0.32 U/mg). The extracts from fish eggs were rich in protease inhibitors that exhibited strong inhibitory activity against trypsin, a serine protease, and papain, a cysteine protease.