• Title, Summary, Keyword: sun: photosphere

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COMMENTS ON MAGNETIC RECONNECTION MODELS OF CANCELING MAGNETIC FEATURES ON THE SUN

  • Litvinenko, Yuri E.
    • Journal of The Korean Astronomical Society
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    • v.48 no.3
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    • pp.187-190
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    • 2015
  • Data analysis and theoretical arguments support magnetic reconnection in a chromospheric current sheet as the mechanism of the observed photospheric magnetic flux cancellation on the Sun. Flux pile-up reconnection in a Sweet–Parker current sheet can explain the observed properties of canceling magnetic features, including the speeds of canceling magnetic fragments, the magnetic fluxes in the fragments, and the flux cancellation rates, inferred from the data. It is discussed how more realistic chromospheric reconnection models can be developed by relaxing the assumptions of a negligible current sheet curvature and a constant height of the reconnection site above the photosphere.

The solar cyclic variation of photospheric intensity analyzed from solar images

  • Jeong, Dong-Gwon;Moon, Byeongha;Park, Hyungmin;Oh, Suyeon
    • The Bulletin of The Korean Astronomical Society
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    • v.41 no.2
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    • pp.67.2-67.2
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    • 2016
  • The Sun has diverse variations in solar atmosphere's layers due to solar activity. This solar variations can be recognized easily by sunspots which appear on the solar photosphere. Thus the sunspot on the photosphere is utilized by direct index of the solar activity. The other variation of the photosphere is center-to-limb variation (CLV). In this study, we analyze the relative intensity observed by SOHO, SDO. The data of photospheric intensity are from full disk images of SOHO/MDI intensity ($6768{\AA}$, from May 1994 to March 2011) and of SDO/HMI intensity ($6173-6174{\AA}$, from May 2010 to June 2016). As the result, we found the latitudinal variation of the intensity. The daily photospheric intensity showed the solar cyclic variation with sunspot number. It has a little difference of phase with sunspot number.

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OBSERVATIONAL TESTS OF CHROMOSPHERIC MAGNETIC RECONNECTION

  • CHAE JONGCHUL;MOON YONG-JAE;PARK SO-YOUNG
    • Journal of The Korean Astronomical Society
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    • v.36 no.spc1
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    • pp.13-20
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    • 2003
  • Observations have indicated that magnetic reconnect ion may occur frequently in the photosphere and chromosphere as well as in the solar corona. The observed features include cancelling magnetic features seen in photospheric magnetograms, and different kinds of small-scale activities such as UV explosive events and EUV jets. By integrating the observed parameters of these features with the Sweet-Parker reconnect ion theory, an attempt is made to clarify the nature of chromospheric magnetic reconnection. Our results suggest that magnetic reconnect ion may be occurring at many different levels of the photosphere and chromosphere without a preferred height and at a faster speed than is predicted by the Sweet-Parker reconnect ion model using the classical value of electric conductivity. Introducing an anomalous magnetic diffusivity 10-100 times the classical value is one of the possible ways of explaining the fast reconnect ion as inferred from observations.

WHITE LIGHT FLARE AT THE SOLAR LIMB

  • HIEI E.;YOU JIANQI;LI HUI
    • Journal of The Korean Astronomical Society
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    • v.36 no.spc1
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    • pp.45-47
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    • 2003
  • A white light flare was observed at the limb on 16 August 1989 in He 10830 ${\AA}$ spectra, H$\alpha$ slit jaw photo-grams, and white light filter-grams of ${\lambda}=5600{\AA}{\pm}800{\AA}$. The kernels of the white light flare are not spatially related with Ha brightenings, suggesting that the flare energy would be released at the photosphere.

A METHOD FOR DETERMINING MAGNETIC HELICITY OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS FROM SOHO/MDI MAGNETO GRAMS

  • CHAE JONGCHUL;JEONG HYEWON
    • Journal of The Korean Astronomical Society
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    • v.38 no.2
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    • pp.295-298
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    • 2005
  • Recently a big progress has been made on the measurements of magnetic helicity of solar active regions based on photospheric magnetograms . In this paper, we present the details of Chae's method of determining the rate of helicity transfer using line-of-sight magnetograms such as taken by SORO /MDI. The method is specifically applied to full-disk magnetograms that are routinely taken at 96-minute cadence.

NON-GREY RADIATIVE TRANSFER IN THE PHOTOSPHERIC CONVECTION : VALIDITY OF THE EDDINGTON APPROXIMATION

  • BACH, KIEHUNN
    • Journal of The Korean Astronomical Society
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    • v.49 no.1
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    • pp.1-8
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    • 2016
  • The aim of this study is to describe the physical processes taking place in the solar photosphere. Based on 3D hydrodynamic simulations including a detailed radiation transfer scheme, we investigate thermodynamic structures and radiation fields in solar surface convection. As a starting model, the initial stratification in the outer envelope calculated using the solar calibrations in the context of the standard stellar theory. When the numerical fluid becomes thermally relaxed, the thermodynamic structure of the steady-state turbulent flow was explicitly collected. Particularly, a non-grey radiative transfer incorporating the opacity distribution function was considered in our calculations. In addition, we evaluate the classical approximations that are usually adopted in the onedimensional stellar structure models. We numerically reconfirm that radiation fields are well represented by the asymptotic characteristics of the Eddington approximation (the diffusion limit and the streaming limit). However, this classical approximation underestimates radiation energy in the shallow layers near the surface, which implies that a reliable treatment of the non-grey line opacities is crucial for the accurate description of the photospheric convection phenomenon.

THE CYCLIC VARIATION OF SOLAR PHOTOSPHERIC INTENSITY FROM SOHO IMAGES

  • Jeong, Dong-Gwon;Park, Hyungmin;Moon, Byeongha;Oh, Suyeon
    • Journal of The Korean Astronomical Society
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    • v.50 no.4
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    • pp.105-109
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    • 2017
  • The well-known solar cycle controls almost the entire appearance of the solar photosphere. We therefore presume that the continuous emission of visible light from the solar surface follows the solar cyclic variation. In this study, we examine the solar cyclic variation of photospheric brightness in the visible range using solar images taken by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI). The photospheric brightness in the visible range is quantified via the relative intensity acquired from in the raw solar images. In contrast to total solar irradiance, the relative intensity is out of phase with the solar cycle. During the solar minimum of solar cycles 23-24, the relative intensity shows enhanced heliolatitudinal asymmetry due to a positive asymmetry of the sunspot number. This result can be explained by the strength of the solar magnetic field that controls the strength of convection, implying that the emission in the visible range is controlled by the strength of convection. This agrees with the photospheric brightness increasing during a period of long spotless days.

MAGNETIC HELICITY PUMPING BY TWISTED FLUX TUBE EXPANSION

  • CHAE JONGCHUL;MOON Y.-J.;RUST D. M.;WANG HAIMIN;GOODE PHILIP R.
    • Journal of The Korean Astronomical Society
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    • v.36 no.1
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    • pp.33-41
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    • 2003
  • Recent observations have shown that coronal magnetic fields in the northern (southern) hemisphere tend to have negative (positive) magnetic helicity. There has been controversy as to whether this hemispheric pattern is of surface or sub-surface origin. A number of studies have focused on clarifying the effect of the surface differential rotation on the change of magnetic helicity in the corona. Meanwhile, recent observational studies reported the existence of transient shear flows in active regions that can feed magnetic helicity to the corona at a much higher rate than the differential rotation does. Here we propose that such transient shear flows may be driven by the torque produced by either the axial or radial expansion of the coronal segment of a twisted flux tube that is rooted deeply below the surface. We have derived a simple relation between the coronal expansion parameter and the amount of helicity transferred via shear flows. To demonstrate our proposition, we have inspected Yohkoh soft X-ray images of NOAA 8668 in which strong shear flows were observed. As a result, we found that the expansion of magnetic fields really took place in the corona while transient shear flows were observed in the photosphere, and the amount of magnetic helicity change due to the transient shear flows is quantitatively consistent with the observed expansion of coronal magnetic fields. The transient shear flows hence may be understood as an observable manifestation of the pumping of magnetic helicity out of the interior portions of the field lines driven by the expansion of coronal parts as was originally proposed by Parker (1974).

THE SOLAR-B MISSION

  • ICHIMOTO KIYOSHI;TEAM THE SOLAR-B
    • Journal of The Korean Astronomical Society
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    • v.38 no.2
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    • pp.307-310
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    • 2005
  • The Solar-B is the third Japanese spacecraft dedicated for solar physics to be launched in summer of 2006. The spacecraft carries a coordinated set of optical, EUV and X-ray instruments that will allow a systematic study of the interaction between the Sun's magnetic field and its high temperature, ionized atmosphere. The Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) consists of a 50cm aperture diffraction limited Gregorian telescope and a focal plane package, and provides quantitative measurements of full vector magnetic fields at the photosphere with spatial resolution of 0.2-0.3 arcsec in a condition free from terrestrial atmospheric seeing. The X-ray telescope (XRT) images the high temperature (0.5 to 10 MK) corona with improved spatial resolution of approximately 1 arcsec. The Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) aims to determine velocity fields and other plasma parameters in the corona and the transition region. The Solar-B telescopes, as a whole, will enable us to explore the origins of the outer solar atmosphere, the corona, and the coupling between the fine magnetic structure at the photosphere and the dynamic processes occurring in the corona. The mission instruments (SOT/EIS/XRT) are joint effort of Japan (JAXA/NAO), the United States (NASA), and the United Kingdom (PPARC). An overview of the spacecraft and its mission instruments are presented.