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A Study on International Exchange of Traditional Herb Medicine (전통 약물의 국제 교류에 관한 소고(小考))

  • Cho, Sunyoung;Kim, Jiyeon;Kang, Yeonseok
    • The Journal of Korean Medical History
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    • v.26 no.2
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    • pp.123-134
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    • 2013
  • Traditional medicine has been exchanged constantly from prehistoric times up to the present. As the global market trade on traditional medicine increases, people now emphasized the importance of traditional medicine. Previously, knowledge about herbal medicines are taught or learned indirectly. Most of it was learned through medical books. But in these contemporary times, herbal medicine's knowledge is shared through journals, congress and some other events in where traditional medicine's information are shared. In the international congress gathering; traditional medicine's experts from many countries shared some additional knowledge. First, "an attitude to medicine that emphasizes on Naturalism". Second, "respect for experienced in traditional medicine". Third, "respect for locality on traditional medicine". Fourth, "a protection for domestic traditional medicine industry" Fifth, "acceptance of traditional medicine from other countries according to domestic health care system".

A Comparison Study of Factors of Willingness to Use Traditional Medicine between Korean, Chinese and Taiwanese (한국, 중국, 대만인의 전통의학 이용 의향에 미치는 요인 비교 : 대학생 및 대학원생을 중심으로)

  • Nam, Min-Ho;Kim, Yun-Ji;Kim, Ho-Sun;Park, Jun-Hyeong;Yeh, Hsin-Yi;Lee, Ye-Seul;Lee, Soon-Ho;Jung, Won-Mo;Hong, Yun-Ki;Lee, Hye-Jung;Park, Hi-Joon;Chae, Youn-Byoung
    • The Journal of Korean Medicine
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    • v.32 no.1
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    • pp.36-55
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    • 2011
  • Objective: This study was performed to compare knowledge of and expectations for traditional medicine between Korean, Chinese and Taiwanese, to figure out whether these factors influence the intention to use traditional medical treatment in the future. Methods: One-hundred ninety-nine Korean, eighty-five Chinese, and one-hundred seventy-four Taiwanese subjects responded to the survey. A one-way ANOVA was performed to compare experiences of traditional medical treatment, knowledge of both traditional medicine and western medicine, expectations for traditional medicine, and future intention to use traditional medical treatment. Multiple regression analyses were also performed to evaluate a possible correlation between the other factors and the intention to use traditional medical treatment in the future. Results: The experiences of traditional medical treatment were in the order of Taiwanese, Korean, and Chinese, from more frequent to less frequent. Chinese had more knowledge of traditional medicine compared to Taiwanese and Koreans, and the expectations for traditional medicine were in the order of Chinese, Korean and Taiwanese, from higher to lower. The intentions to use traditional medical treatment in the future were in the order of Korean, Chinese and Taiwanese, from more to less. Multiple regression analyses showed that experiences of traditional medical treatment, knowledge of traditional medicine, and expectations for traditional medicine were associated with the intention to use traditional medicine in the future in Korean and Taiwanese, but not in Chinese. Only the expectations for traditional medicine were associated with the future intentions to use traditional medical treatment in Chinese. Conclusions: These findings suggest that Korean and Taiwanese may need to improve their knowledge of traditional medicine whereas Chinese need to link their knowledge of traditional medicine with the intention to use it in the future. Understanding the characteristics of traditional medicine would probably contribute to enhancing the intentions to use it more.

The Comparative Study of Oriental Medicine in Korea, Japan and China (한국(韓國)과 일본(日本) 및 중국(中國)의 동양의학(東洋醫學)에 대한 비교연구(比較硏究))

  • Cho, Ki-Ho
    • The Journal of Korean Medicine
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    • v.19 no.1
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    • pp.271-298
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    • 1998
  • During these days of new understanding, western medicine has developed remarkably and a revaluation of traditional medicine has been achieved. This appears to have resulted from the sound criticisms of what western medicine has achieved up to now; excessive subdivisions of clinical medicine, severe toxicity of chemical drugs, lack of understanding about patients complaints which cannot be understood objectively, and etc. It is thought that the role of traditional medicine will be more important in the future than it is now. Someone said that the research methods of traditional medicine depends on the way of experimental science too much. That there was no consideration of a system for traditional medicine and the critic also went so far as to assert that in some cases the characteristics of eastern ideas is to permit irrationalism itself. In view of this thinking, the term traditional medicine seems to have been used somewhat too vaguely. However, traditional medicine is a medical treatment which has existed since before the appearance of modern medicine and it was formed from a traditional culture with a long history. One form of traditional medicine, oriental medicine based upon ancient Chinese medicine, was received in such countries as Korea, Japan, Thailand, Vietnam, Tibet, and Mongolia. Oriental medicine then developed in accordance with its own environment, race, national characteristics, and history. Although there are some simultaneous differences between them, three nations in Eastern Asia; Korea, Japan, and China, have especially similar features in their clinical prescriptions and medical literature. These three nations are trying to understand each others unique traditional medicines through numerous exchanges. Even though many differences in their ways of studying have developed over history exist, recent academic discussions have been made to explore new ways into oriental medicine. Therefore a comparative study of oriental medicine has gradually been thought to be more important. In Korea the formation of a new future-oriented paradigm for oriental medicine is being demanded. The purpose of the new paradigm is to create a new recognition of traditional culture which creates an understanding of oriental medicine to replace the diminished understanding of oriental medicine that was brought about by the self-denial of traditional culture in modem history and cultural collisions between oriental and occidental points of view. Therefore, to make a new paradigm for oriental medicine which is suitable for these days, and fortifies the merit of oriental medicine while compensating its defects, the author has compared the characteristics of oriental medicines in Korea, Japan, and China. The conclusions of this research are as follows: 1. The fundamental differences of the traditional medicines of these three nations are caused by the differences in the systems of Naekyung and Sanghannon. 2. The pattern-identification of illnesses is generally divided into two categories; the pattern identification of Zang-Fu and the pattern identification of prescription. 3. There are many differences in the definition of terms, such as Yin and Yang, Deficiency and Excess, and etc. 4. Chinese traditional medicine has some new concepts about pattern identification and epidemic febrile disease. 5. Japanese traditional medicine has some characteristics about pattern identification of the whole bodys condition and signs of abdominal palpation. 6. In terms of the effects of herbal drugs, Chinese traditional medicine attaches great importance to the experiential efficacy of the herb, and Japanese traditional medicine is taking a serious view of the effects of experimental medical actions.

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A Study of the Development Model of Chinese Traditional Medicin - Centering on the Process of the Professionalization - (중의학의 발전모형에 대한 연구 -전문화과정을 중심으로-)

  • Lee Hyun Ji
    • Journal of Physiology & Pathology in Korean Medicine
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    • v.17 no.3
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    • pp.611-616
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    • 2003
  • Through the whole period of the twentieth century, Chinese Traditional Medicine has been affected by the political and cultural changes of Chinese society. Before the 1949 Communist Revolution, Chinese Traditional Medicine was regarded as a dark past which should be cleared off. But Chinese Traditional Medicine has been reevaluated as a national medicine and spreaded quickly since the 1949 Communist Revolution. Moreover, 'the bare foot doctor' who received short term training appeared during the Cultural Revolution. It enhanced the status of Chinese Traditional Medicine. At the same time, it was estimated as a model of the self-reliant development of Third World countries. But the direction of development of Chinese Traditional Medicine was changed again recently. Chinese government has adapted the open-economy policy since the late 1970s. Accordingly Chinese Traditional Medicine also has been changed. Nowadays it pursues the professional development strategy. This paper inquired the following research questions. First, what kind of historical changes in the development strategy of Chinese Traditional Medicine has happened? Second, how much Chinese Traditional Medicine has accomplished the professionalization? Third, what kind of problems Chinese Traditional Medicine has met in the process of professionalization? Finally, why Chinese Traditional Medicine has adapted the professional development strategy?

Study of the Professionalization of Education for Traditional Chinese Medicine (중의학 교육의 전문화에 대한 연구)

  • Kwon, Young-Kyu;Lee, Hyun-Ji
    • Journal of Physiology & Pathology in Korean Medicine
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    • v.19 no.4
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    • pp.860-864
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    • 2005
  • Nowadays most of scholarship is based on the western model. Traditional Chinese Medical education system also follows the western medical education. In the views of medical sociology, it shows very interesting phenomenon that the modernization of traditional area follows the western model of modernization. Moreover, it provides a good chance to discuss whether modernization and westernization of tradition is real development or not. Traditional Chinese Medicine had been the only institutional medicine in China for a long time. But the status of Traditional Chinese Medicine has been changed very rapidly since modern era. Shanghai Traditional Chinese Medical School was established in 1916. But National Party government tried to abolish Traditional Chinese Medicine and it met a crisis of maintenance. But the situation has been dramatically changed when Communist Party got the power in 1949. The Communist Government needed a chief medical service. And Traditional Chinese Medicine could meet the condition. Traditional Chinese Medicine could provide also the ideology of national superiority. Therefore, Traditional Chinese Medicine has been protected and developed by the assistance of the Communist Party. In the process, Traditional Chinese Medical education has been professionalized.

Treatment of chemotherapy-related peripheral neuropathy with traditional Chinese medicine from the perspective of blood-arthralgia Zheng

  • Cao, Peng;Yang, Jie;Cai, Xueting;Wang, Xiaoning;Huo, Jiege
    • CELLMED
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    • v.2 no.4
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    • pp.30.1-30.4
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    • 2012
  • Traditional Chinese medicine classifies peripheral nerve impairment as paralysis and arthromyodynia, and considers that it is the result of defects of meridians and vessels, QI and blood, bones and muscles. Huangqi (Astragalus) Guizhi (Cassia Twig) Wuwu Tang, as a Qi invigorating formula, is usually used to improve peripheral nerve impairment. In recent years, some scholars have conducted research into Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) treatment with Huangqi Guizhi Wuwu Tang and certain values of this treatment approach have been identified. CIPN is a type of blood-arthralgia Zheng in traditional Chinese medicine theory. In this review, we will discuss the treatment of CIPN with Huangqi Guizhi Wuwu Tang according to blood-arthtalgia Zheng.

The Current Situation of Mongolian Traditional Medicine and It's Historical Development (몽골 전통의료의 현황 및 역사적 발달과정)

  • Yoo, Wang Keun
    • Journal of Society of Preventive Korean Medicine
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    • v.18 no.2
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    • pp.125-132
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    • 2014
  • Objective : The aim of this study is to review the historical development and current situation of Mongolian traditional medicine. Method : Systematic literature review for books, journals, governments statistics, reports on mongolian traditional medicine was carried out. Results : The theory of Mongolian traditional medicine is influenced by the philosophy and medical theories of the ancient orient such as India, Tibet and China-theories of hot and cold, principle of yin and yang and five elements. There are very unique treatments like brain tram concussion, fermented horse milk treatment as well as moxibustion, acupuncture, and blood letting. It appears that they are very closed to nomadic life. Training program of each institutes need to be standardized. Mongolian traditional medicine had been almost destroyed by the influence of communist idea from 1930s until the end of the 1980s. Since 1990, Mongolian government put much emphasis on the development of traditional medicine. And now about 3.7% of total beds is traditional medicine one and that there are six TM schools and the total number of traditional medicine in 2012 is 1696. However, there are still the lack of manpower, facilities, standardized training program and scientific research for traditional medicine. Conclusion : Mongolian traditional medicine has been developed over centuries in response to Mongolia's unique geographical and climate conditions and the lifestyles of its people and that made contribution to the health of mongolian people. However, it needs to be strengthened because there are poor infrastructure and training program.

Phytochemical Constituents from the Rhizomes of Osmunda japonica Thunb and Their Anti-oxidant Activity

  • Woo, Kyeong wan;Jung, Ja Kyun;Lee, Hyun Joo;Kim, Tae Muk;Kim, Min Suk;Jung, Ho Kyung;An, Byeongkwan;Ham, Seong Ho;Jeon, Byung Hun;Cho, Hyun Woo
    • Natural Product Sciences
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    • v.23 no.3
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    • pp.217-221
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    • 2017
  • Eleven compounds (1-11) were isolated from the rhizomes of Osmunda japonica, and their structures were elucidated based on $^1H$, $^{13}C-NMR$ and LC-IT-TOF MS data. Of these compounds, all compounds (1 - 11) have been previously reported, although five (6 - 9, 11) have not previously been isolated from this plant. The antioxidant activities of isolated compounds (1 - 11) were measured by DPPH and ABTS assays, and compound 10 showed the high antioxidant activity.

Proposed Mechanisms and Further study for Korean Traditional medicines-Drug Interaction in a view of Toxicology (한약의 약물상호작용 기전과 연구방향 - 독성학적인 측면을 중심으로 -)

  • Park, Yeong-Chul;Kim, Myung-Dong;Lee, Sun-Dong
    • Journal of Society of Preventive Korean Medicine
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    • v.15 no.1
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    • pp.1-16
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    • 2011
  • Objectives : The mechanisms for korean traditional medicine-drug interaction has not been well reviewed in spite that the chance for co-administration with western drugs or diet supplements has been increased. Especially, it is well known that various cytochrome P450s play a major role in drug-drug interaction. Of course, Korean traditional medicines is not excluded in a view of metabolism or biotransformation by cytochrome P450. This article was focused on reviewing the possible roles of cytochrome P450 in Korean traditional medicine-drug interaction, Also, the directions for further studies were suggested in terms of Korean traditional medicine-drug interaction. Methods : New studies for korean traditional medicine-drug interaction were reviewed and summarized in terms of cytochrome P450 activities by various Korean traditional medicines and western drugs. Results and Conclusions : Even if a few studies related to Korean traditional medicine-drug interactions was carried out, almost no studies for Korean traditional medicine-drug interactions has been found in a view of cytochrome P450. It was suggested that Korean traditional medicines and their decoction should be analyzed that how they effects on cytochrome P450, expecially CYP 1, 2, 3 families and how they interact with western drugs.

A Survey on the Status of Employees of Traditional Korean Medicine Hospitals

  • Bak, Yo-Han;Huang, Dae-Sun;Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo
    • The Journal of Korean Medicine
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    • v.33 no.2
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    • pp.56-63
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    • 2012
  • Objectives: To undertake manpower-related improvements based on a comparison between specialists in the traditional Korean medicine hospitals(TKMH) and their counterparts in Western medicine Methods: A survey of the TKMH based on questionnaire sheets dispatched to them by mail(57 of 142 responded) in the June December, 2008 period, and on almanac statistics provided by the Ministry for Health, Welfare and Family Affairs of Korean Government. Results: Overall, the workforce engaged in the traditional Korean medicine hospitals comprises traditional Korean medical doctors(28%), nurses(23%), administrative staffs(19%), assistant nurses(9%), medical record keepers(2%), nutritionists(2%), herbal pharmacists(1%), and others(16%). Each hospital has 16.5 traditional Korean medical doctors on average, which can be broken down into 6.2 specialists, 1.3 generalists, and 9.3 residents/interns. Only 10.7% of whole of traditional Korean medical doctors work in the hospitals, compared to 54.5% of Western medicine doctors. The ratio of traditional Korean medical doctors to the entirety of employees in the TKMH is 2.5 times higher than their Western medicine counterparts, while the ratio of medical technicians to the entire employees in the TKMH is 20 times lower than in the Western medicine counterparts. Conclusions: To provide more qualified medical service in the TKMH, they will be required to increase the proportion of non medical doctor employees, like Western medicine counterparts.