• Title, Summary, Keyword: tuna protein

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Partial Replacement of Fish Meal by Fermented Skipjack Tuna Viscera in Juvenile Olive Flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) Diets

  • Lee, Sang-Min;Pham, Minh Anh;Shin, Il-Shik
    • Fisheries and aquatic sciences
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    • v.12 no.4
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    • pp.305-310
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    • 2009
  • This study was carried out to evaluate the use of fermented skipjack tuna viscera (FSTV) as an alternative for fish meal in juvenile olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) diets. Lactobacillus bulgaricus was used as a starter for fermentation of skipjack tuna viscera. Four isonitrogenous (49% crude protein) and isocaloric (4 kcal/g DM) diets were formulated to contain graded levels (0, 5, 10, and 15%) of FSTV. Each experimental diet was fed three replicate groups (40 fish per tank) of juvenile flounder (average weight, $3.3\pm0.2$ g) for 5 weeks. At the end of feeding experiment, inclusion of FSTV up to 15% in diets did not affect survival rate (%) and weight gain of fish. Feed efficiency, protein efficiency ratio, protein and lipid retentions of fish fed the diet containing 10% FSTV were higher than those of fish fed the control diet (P<0.05). The values of fish fed the diet containing 15% FSTV were not different from those of fish fed other diets. Whole body lipid content of fish fed the diet containing 10% FSTV was higher than that of fish fed the diet containing 15% FSTV and control diet. The present results indicate that fermented skipjack tuna viscera could partially replace fish meal in juvenile flounder feed, and the inclusion of 10% FSTV may be efficient in improving the feed utilization of fish.

Effects of Extraction Methods on Histidine-containing Low-molecular Weight Peptides and Pro-oxidants Contents in Tuna Thunnus Extracts (다랑어(Thunnus) 추출물 중의 Histidine 함유 저분자 펩타이드 및 산화촉진물질 함량에 미치는 추출방법의 영향)

  • Kim, Hong-Kil;Song, Ho-Su
    • Korean Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
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    • v.50 no.6
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    • pp.684-693
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    • 2017
  • We investigated methods for extracting histidine-containing low-molecular-weight (LMW) peptides such as anserine, carnosine and histidine from the edible meat of tuna byproducts. Extracts were treated by several methods including heat treatment ($80^{\circ}C$, 10 min), DOWEX ion exchange (IEC), ultrafiltration (UF), and carboxymethyl (CM)-cellulose column chromatography (IEC+CMC); then the levels of protein, total iron, histidine, carnosine, and anserine were measured. Extracts treated with IEC+CMC using CM-cellulose were analyzed for total iron, protein, histidine, and anserine content, which were $6.27{\pm}0.26mg/mL$, $5.20{\pm}0.21{\mu}g/mL$, 0.80 mg/mL, 0.208 mg/mL, and 4.40 mg/mL, respectively, in yellowfin tuna; and $9.05{\pm}0.82mg/mL$, $4.06{\pm}0.20{\mu}g/mL$, 1.62 mg/mL, 0.012 mg/mL, and 7.28 mg/mL in bigeye tuna. By comparison in IEC-UF treated extracts, protein, total iron, and histidine content decreased by 43%, 73%, and 27% in yellowfin and 0.4%, 54%, and 23% in bigeye tuna, wheres carnosine and anserine content increased by 22% and 17%, respectively. Freeze-dried (FD) extracts exhibited similar trends as non-dried extracts, i.e., dipeptide content increased with purification steps, whereas pro-oxidant (total iron and protein) content decreased. IEC+CMC treated FD extracts had the highest anserine, content, and the greatest reductuion in pro-oxidants.

Separation of Protein and Fatty Acids from Tuna Viscera Using Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

  • Kang Kil-Yoon;Ahn Dong-Hyun;Jung Sun-Mi;Kim Dong-Hun;Chun Byung-Soo
    • Biotechnology and Bioprocess Engineering:BBE
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    • v.10 no.4
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    • pp.315-321
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    • 2005
  • Supercritical carbon dioxide extraction was investigated as a method for removing lipids and bad flavor from tuna viscera. To find the optimum conditions, different experimental variables, such as pressure, temperature, flow rate of solvent and sample size, were evaluated for the effective removal of lipids and the undesirable smell. Ethanol was used as the entrainer, with a $3\%$ by vol $CO_2$ flow rate. By increasing the pressure at constant temperature, the efficiency of the lipid removal was improved and the protein was concentrated without denaturalization. The main fatty acids extracted from the tuna viscera were palmitic acid (16:0), heptadecanoic acid (17:1), oleic acid (18:1) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6). The major amino acids in the tuna viscera treated by supercritical carbon dioxide were glutamic acid, leucine and lysine, and the free amino acids were L-proline, taurine and L-$\alpha$-aminoadipic acid.

Food Component Characteristics of Tuna Livers

  • Kang, Kyung-Tae;Heu, Min-Soo;Jee, Seung-Joon;Lee, Jae-Hyoung;Kim, Hye-Suk;Kim, Jin-Soo
    • Food Science and Biotechnology
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    • v.16 no.3
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    • pp.367-373
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    • 2007
  • Livers of skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) and yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) were investigated on the food compositional characteristics and also compared to that of Alaska pollack (Theragra chalcogramma). The proximate compositions of skipjack tuna and yellowfin tuna livers were high in crude protein, carbohydrate, and crude ash, while were low in crude lipid when compared to that of Alaska pollack liver. The results of heavy metal suggested that tuna livers appeared safe as a food resource. The total amino acid contents of skipjack tuna and yellowfin tuna livers were 17.7 and 17.1 g/100 g, respectively, and the major amino acids in both livers were aspartic acid, glutamic acid, alanine, valine, leucine, and lysine. Tuna livers were good sources of iron and zinc, while have low lipid content. The extractive nitrogen contents of skipjack tuna and yellowfin tuna livers were 526.5 and 468.2 mg/100 g, respectively, and their major free amino acids were taurine, glutamic acid, and alanine. From the results of taste value, the major taste active compounds among free amino acids were glutamic acid and aspartic acid.

Chemical composition of protein concentrate prepared from Yellowfin tuna Thunnus albacares roe by cook-dried process

  • Lee, Hyun Ji;Park, Sung Hwan;Yoon, In Seong;Lee, Gyoon-Woo;Kim, Yong Jung;Kim, Jin-Soo;Heu, Min Soo
    • Fisheries and aquatic sciences
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    • v.19 no.3
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    • pp.12.1-12.8
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    • 2016
  • Roe is the term used to describe fish eggs (oocytes) gathered in skeins and is one of the most valuable food products from fishery sources. Thus, means of processing are required to convert the underutilized yellowfin tuna roes (YTR) into more marketable and acceptable forms as protein concentrate. Roe protein concentrates (RPCs) were prepared by cooking condition (boil-dried concentrate, BDC and steam-dried concentrate, SDC, respectively) and un-cooking condition (freeze-dried concentrate, FDC) from yellowfin tuna roe. The yield of RPCs was in the range from 22.2 to 25.3 g/100 g of roe. RPCs contained protein (72.3-77.3 %), moisture (4.3-5.6 %), lipid (10.6-11.3 %) and ash (4.3-5.7 %) as the major constituents. The prominent amino acids of RPCs were aspartic acid, 8.7-9.2, glutamic acid, 13.1-13.2, and leucine, 8.5-8.6 g/100 g of protein. Major differences were not observed in each of the amino acid. K, S, Na, and P as minerals were the major elements in RPCs. No difference noted in sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis protein band (15-100 K) possibly representing partial hydrolysis of myosin. Therefore, RPCs from YTR could be use potential protein ingredient for human food and animal feeds.

Effects of Extraction Method on the Histidine Containing Low Molecular Weight Peptide and Pro-oxidants Contents of Tuna Boiled Extracts (참치자숙액 추출물 중의 히스티딘계 저분자 펩타이드 및 산화촉진물질 함량에 미치는 추출방법의 영향)

  • Kang, Ok-Ju
    • Korean journal of food and cookery science
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    • v.24 no.3
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    • pp.349-357
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    • 2008
  • In an effort to augment extractability of carnosine and anserine at the levels of pro-oxidants such as iron and protein in Tuna boiled extracts(Skipjack, Yellowfin and Bigeye), we assessed the effects of heated and ion exchange chromatography(IEC) and ultrafiltration(UF) using a MW 500 cut-off(500 MWCO). We also evaluated the antioxidant activity of these extracts processed as free radical scavengers and reducing agents. Tuna boiled extracts of dark and ordinary muscle protein and total iron were reduced, whereas carnosine and anserine concentrations and antioxidant activity were increased. The carnosine and anserine concentrations of the ion exchange and permeate UF(IEC-UF) extracts were higher than those observed in the heated and permeate UF(heat-UF), whereas the protein and total iron contents were lower than that observed in the heat-UF. The quantity of carnosine and anserine in ordinary muscle was higher than that detected in dark muscle. HPLC analysis and SDS-PAGE were shown to removes the effect of UF on high molecular weight impurities in the tuna boiled extracts. The major free amino acids(FFAs) from Skipjack, Yellowfin and Bigeye tuna IEC-UF extracts were anserine, histidine and carnosine. These three peptides constituted more than 80~85%. of the detected amino acid. The IEC-UF treated ordinary muscle extracts evidenced the highest levels of DPPH radical scavenging activity and the highest levels of reducing power among the various extracts. The IEC-UF extracts evidenced a DPPH radical scavenging effect equal to that of 1mM ascorbic acid.

Effects on Quality Characteristics of Extruded Meat Analog by Addition of Tuna Sawdust (참치 톱밥의 첨가가 압출성형 인조육의 품질 특성에 미치는 영향)

  • Cho, Sung Young;Ryu, Gi-Hyung
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Food Science and Nutrition
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    • v.46 no.4
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    • pp.465-472
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    • 2017
  • In this study, tuna sawdust was added to extruded meat analog in order to develop a meat analog with high quality. Addition of tuna sawdust has merit for utilizing a byproduct from poultry processing. Physicochemical characteristics were examined through the extrusion cooking process. The basic mixture of sample mixed with 65% deffated soy flour 25% isolated soy protein, and 10% corn starch was setup as the raw material. Three kinds of samples were made in total by addition of 15% and 30% tuna sawdust to this mixture. The extrusion process had a screw speed of 250 rpm, die temperature of $140^{\circ}C$, and moisture content of 50%. As addition of tuna sawdust increased, breaking strength and density decreased, specific length increased, and integrity and water holding capacity decreased. Likewise, nitrogen solubility index and protein digestibility decreased as addition of tuna sawdust increased. DPPH radical scavenging activity increased as addition of tuna sawdust addition, whereas it decreased as storage period increased to 30 or 60 days. The value of rancidity decreased as addition of tuna sawdust increased. However, 60 days later, radical scavenging activity increased more or less, and a significant difference was detected 150 days later. In conclusion, addition of tuna sawdust increased soft texture, and nutrition of the basic mixture sample. The process promoting functionality such as improvement of antioxidant function was confirmed through this study.

Preparation and characterization of protein isolate from Yellowfin tuna Thunnus albacares roe by isoelectric solubilization/precipitation process

  • Lee, Hyun Ji;Lee, Gyoon-Woo;Yoon, In Seong;Park, Sung Hwan;Park, Sun Young;Kim, Jin-Soo;Heu, Min Soo
    • Fisheries and aquatic sciences
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    • v.19 no.3
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    • pp.14.1-14.10
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    • 2016
  • Isoelectric solubilization/precipitation (ISP) processing allows selective, pH-induced water solubility of proteins with concurrent separation of lipids and removal of materials not intended for human consumption such as bone, scales, skin, etc. Recovered proteins retain functional properties and nutritional value. Four roe protein isolates (RPIs) from yellowfin tuna roe were prepared under different solubilization and precipitation condition (pH 11/4.5, pH 11/5.5, pH 12/4.5 and pH 12/5.5). RPIs contained 2.3-5.0 % moisture, 79.1-87.8 % protein, 5.6-7. 4 % lipid and 3.0-3.8 % ash. Protein content of RPI-1 and RPI-2 precipitated at pH 4.5 and 5.5 after alkaline solubilization at pH 11, was higher than those of RPI-3 and RPI-4 after alkaline solubilization at pH 12 (P < 0.05). Lipid content (5.6-7.4 %) of RPIs was lower than that of freeze-dried concentrate (10.6 %). And leucine and lysine of RPIs were the most abundant amino acids (8.8-9.4 and 8.5-8.9 g/100 g protein, respectively). S, Na, P, K as minerals were the major elements in RPIs. SDS-PAGE of RPIs showed bands at 100, 45, 25 and 15 K. Moisture and protein contents of process water as a 2'nd byproduct were 98.9-99.0 and 1.3-1.8 %, respectively. Therefore, yellowfin tuna roe isolate could be a promising source of valuable nutrients for human food and animal feeds.

Food Component Characteristics of Skipjack (Katsuwonus pelamis) and Yellowfin Tuna (Thunnus albacares) Roes (가다랑어 및 황다랑어 알의 식품성분 특성)

  • Heu, Min-Soo;Kim, Hye-Suk;Jung, Soon-Cheol;Park, Chan-Ho;Park, Hea-Jin;Yeum, Dong-Min;Park, Ho-Sang;Kim, Chun-Gon;Kim, Jin-Soo
    • Korean Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
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    • v.39 no.1
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    • pp.1-8
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    • 2006
  • For the effective utilization of tuna processing byproducts such as roes of skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) and yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacores) as a food resource, the roes of skipjack and yellowfin tuna were examined on food component characteristics and also compared to those of Alaska pollack (Theragra chalcogramma). The concentrations of heavy metal in both roe of the skipjack and yellowfin tuna were below the reported safety limits, therefore, these roes appeared to be safe as a raw material for food resource. The contents of crude protein were 21.4% in the skipjack tuna roe and 21.5% in the yellow fin tuna roe, which showed to be the major component in tuna roes. The prominent amino acids of total amino acids were aspartic acid, glutamic acid, leucine and lysine, and these amino acids were comprise to be 38.4-41.2% of total amino acid in both tuna roes. The total lipid content were 2.1 % in the skipjack tuna roe and 2.0% in the yellofin tuna roe. The major component of total lipid was found to be triglyceride in both tuna roes (skipjack tuna roe, 93.3%; yellow fin tuna roe, 92.0%), which was high in the compositions of 16:0, l8:1n-9, and 22:6n-3. The content of DHA in total lipid of the tuna roes (skipjack tuna roe, 29.9%; yellowfin tuna roe, 36.3%) were higher than that of Alaska pollack roe (18.1%). Based on the results of the proximate composition, mineral, amino acid and lipid characteristic, roes of skipjack tuna and yellowfin tuna showed potential as a raw material for food.

Tuna by-product meal as a dietary protein source replacing fishmeal in juvenile Korean rockfish Sebastes schlegeli

  • Kim, Kyoung-Duck;Jang, Ji Won;Kim, Kang-Woong;Lee, Bong-Joo;Hur, Sang Woo;Han, Hyon-Sob
    • Fisheries and aquatic sciences
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    • v.21 no.8
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    • pp.29.1-29.8
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    • 2018
  • This study was conducted to evaluate the use of tuna by-product meal (TBM) as a substitute for fishmeal in juvenile Korean rockfish (Sebastes schlegeli) diets. Five isonitrogenous (52% crude protein) and isocaloric (4.9 kcal/g) diets were prepared. Control diet (Con) was formulated to contain brown fishmeal, whereas 25, 50, 75, and 100% of fishmeal was substituted with the same percentage of TBM in the TBM25, TBM50, TBM75, and TBM100 diets, respectively. Three replicate groups of fish (initial weight, $29.5{\pm}0.6g$) were fed one of the five diets for 12 weeks. The mean weight gain of fish fed the Con and TBM25 diets was significantly higher than that of fish fed the TBM100 diet (P < 0.05), but it was not significantly different from the weight gain of fish fed the TBM50 and TBM75 diets. The feed efficiency and protein efficiency ratios of fish fed the Con diet were significantly higher than those of fish fed the TBM100 diet (P < 0.05), but were not significantly different from those fed the TBM25, TBM50, and TBM75 diets. The TBM25, TBM50, TBM75, and TBM100 diets had significantly (P < 0.05) lower incidence cost and higher profit index than the Con diet. These results suggest that the tuna by-product meal used in this study could replace up to 75% of fishmeal protein in the diet without reducing growth and feed utilization in juvenile Korean rockfish weighing 29-53 g. By considering feed cost, the TBM 75 diet is recommendable for Korean rockfish farming.