• Title/Summary/Keyword: westerly waves

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The Generation of Westerly Waves by Sobaek Mountains (소백산맥에 의한 서풍 파동 발생)

  • Kim, Jin wook;Youn, Daeok
    • Journal of the Korean earth science society
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    • v.38 no.1
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    • pp.24-34
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    • 2017
  • The westerly waves generation is described in the advanced earth science textbook used at high school as follows: as westerly wind approaches and blows over large mountains, the air flow shows wave motions in downwind side, which can be explained by the conservation of potential vorticity. However, there has been no case study showing the phenomena of the mesoscale westerly waves with observational data in the area of small mountains in Korea. And thus the wind speed and time persistency of westerly winds along with the width and length of mountains have never been studied to explain the generation of the westerly waves. As a first step, we assured the westerly waves generated in the downwind side of Sobaek mountains based on surface station wind data nearby. Furthermore, the critical or minimum wind velocity of the westerly wind over Sobaek mountains to generate the downwind wave were derived and calcuated tobe about $0.6m\;s^{-1}$ for Sobaek mountains, which means that the westerly waves could be generated in most cases of westerly blowing over the mountains. Using surface station data and 4-dimensional assimilation data of RDAPS (Regional Data Assimilation and Prediction System) provided by Korea Meteorological Agency, we also analyzed cases of westerly waves occurrence and life cycle in the downwind side of Sobaek mountains for a year of 2014. The westerly waves occurred in meso-${\beta}$ or -${\gamma}$ scales. The westerly waves generated by the mountains disappeared gradually with wind speed decreasing. The occurrence frequency of the vorticity with meso-${\beta}$ scale got to be higher when the stronger westerly wind blew. When we extended the spatial range of the analysis, phenomena of westerly waves were also observed in the downwind side of Yensan mountains in Northeastern China. Our current work will be a study material to help students understand the atmospheric phenomena perturbed by mountains.

A Study on the Development of the Sustained Changma in 2007

  • Lee, Sang-Min;Byun, Hi-Ryong
    • Journal of the Korean earth science society
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    • v.30 no.5
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    • pp.529-549
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    • 2009
  • In 2007, just after the recession of the Changma, anomalously long rainy period (from July 30 to August 15) occurred in Korea. To identify the cause of the sustained rainy period, we performed synoptic analysis and the associated air motions. The behavior of each air parcel trajectory associated with atmospheric motion was then investigated. As a result, three particular phenomena occurring at latitudes lower than $40^{\circ}N$ were discovered. First, a mass of relatively cold air, referred to as E, made a deep intrusion from $20^{\circ}N$ to $60^{\circ}N$. Second, this intrusion was accompanied by another mass of air called dE. It was colder and drier than E and originated from the mid-troposphere over the tropical ocean. Third, dE and E rotated clockwise three times over a period of 17 days over the Northwestern Pacific and blocked the westerly waves imbedded in the zonal flow from propagating. Two additional phenomena were observed at latitudes higher than $40^{\circ}N$. First, the cold core system, while approaching from the west with low geopotential values at its center, was stagnated over Shanxi China. It enhanced the northward intrusion of dE and E, and then diminished. The subsequent low system showed similar evolution as the first one. Second, a warm core anticyclone was formed over Lake Baikal, blocking the westerlies for 13 days and contributed to the persistent northward incursion of warm moist air. Moreover, a horizontally extended intrusion of upper level clouds from the tropics to $50^{\circ}N$, which may be interpreted as a tropical plume, was found around the end of the period (from August 12 to 15, 2007) with successive tropical nights over Korea.