Muscle Activities in the Lower Limbs for the Different Movement Patterns on an Unstable Platform

  • Piao, Yong-Jun (Department of Biomedical Engineering, Graduate school, Chonbuk National University) ;
  • Choi, Youn-Jung (Department of Healthcare Engineering, Graduate school, Chonbuk National University) ;
  • Kwon, Tae-Kyu (Division of Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering, Chonbuk National University) ;
  • Hwang, Ji-Hye (Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Samsung Medical Center) ;
  • Kim, Jung-Ja (Division of Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering, Chonbuk National University) ;
  • Kim, Dong-Wook (Division of Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering, Chonbuk National University) ;
  • Kim, Nam-Gyun (Division of Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering, Chonbuk National University)
  • Published : 2007.10.31

Abstract

We performed experimental studies on the muscle activities in the lower limbs for the different movement patterns on an unstable platform. A training system for postural control using an unstable platform that we previously developed was applied for the experiments. This unstable platform provides 360 degrees of movement allowing for training of posture in various directions and provides simultaneous excitations to visual sensory, somatic sensation and vestibular organs. Compare with the stable platform, keeping body balance on the unstable platform requests more effective sensation from vision, vestibular sense and somatic sense. Especially, the somatosensory inputs from the muscle proprioceptors and muscle force are crucial. To study the muscle activities for the different movement patterns and find the best training method for improving the ability of postural control through training and improving the lower extremity muscular strength, fifteen young healthy participants went through trainings and experiments. The participants were instructed to move the center of pressure following the appointed movement pattern while standing on the unstable platform. The electromyographies of the muscles in the lower limbs were recorded and analyzed in the time and the frequency domain. Our experimental results showed the significant differences in muscle activities for the different movement patterns. Especially, the spectral energy of electromyography signals in muscle for the movement pattern in anterior-posterior direction was significantly higher than those occurred in the other patterns. The muscles in the lower leg, especially tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius were more activated compared to the others for controlling the balance of body on the unstable platform. The experimental results suggest that, through the choice of different movement pattern, the training for lower extremity strength could be performed on specific muscles in different intensity. And, the ability of postural control could be improved by the training for lower extremity strength.

References

  1. F. B. Horak, C. L. Shupert, and A. Mirka, 'Components of posturaldyscontrol in the elderly: a review,' Neurobiology of Aging, vol. 10, no. 10, pp. 727-738, 1989 https://doi.org/10.1016/0197-4580(89)90010-9
  2. C. A. Laughton, M. Slavin, K. Katdare, L. Nolan, J.F. Bean, D.C. Kerrigan, E. Philips, L.A. Lipsite, and J.J. Collins, 'Aging, muscle activity and balance control: physiologic changes associated with balance impairment,' Gait and Posture, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 101-108, 2003 https://doi.org/10.1016/S0966-6362(02)00200-X
  3. S. R. Lord, J. A. Ward, P. Williams, and K. J. Anstey, 'Physiological factors associated with falls in order community-dwelling women,' J. Am. Geriatr. Soc., vol. 42, pp. 1110-1117, 1994
  4. R. H. Whipple, L. I. Wolfson, and P. M. Amerman, 'The relationship of knee and ankle weakness to falls in nursing home residents,' J. Am. Geriatr. Soc., vol. 35, no. 1, pp. 329-332, 1987
  5. D. M. Buchner, M. E. Cress, B. J. de Lateur, P. C. Esselman, A. J. Margherita, and R. Price, 'The effect of strength and endurance training on gait, balance, fall risk, and health services use in community-living older adults,' J. Gerontol. Biol. Sci. Med. Sci., vol. 52, no. 4, pp. M218-224, 1997
  6. M. E. Cress, D. M. Buchner, K. A. Questad, P.C. Esselman, B. J. de Lateur, and R. S. Schwartz, 'Exercise: effects on physical functional performance in independent older adults,' J. Gerontol. Biol. Sci. Med. Sci., vol. 54, no. 5, pp. M242-248, 1999 https://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/54.5.M242
  7. R. G. Hamman, I. Mekjavic, A. I. Mallinson, and N. S. Longride, 'Training effects during repeated therapy sessions of blance training using visual feedback,' Arch. Phys. Med. Rehabil., vol. 73, no. 8, pp. 738-744, 1992
  8. J. Wakeling, R. Delancy, and I. Dudkiewicz, 'A method for quantifying dynamic muscle dysfunction in children and young adults with celebral palsy,' Gaint and Postural, vol. 25, no. 5, pp. 580-589, 2007
  9. C. B. Ahn, E. J. Woo, Y. R. Yoon, and K. J. Lee, 'Recent development tendency and future of biosignal processing,' J. Biomed. Eng. Res., vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 119-138, 1999
  10. D. L. Beoit, M. Lamontagne, G. Cerulli, and A. Liti, 'The clinical significance of electromyography normalisation techniques in subjects with anterior cruciate ligament injury during treadmill walking,' Gait and Postural, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 56-63, 2003 https://doi.org/10.1016/S0966-6362(02)00194-7