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Preparation and Properties of the Fast-Curing γ-Ray-Shielding Materials Based on Polyurethane

  • Ni, Minxuan (Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics) ;
  • Tang, Xiaobin (Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics) ;
  • Chai, Hao (Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics) ;
  • Zhang, Yun (Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics) ;
  • Chen, Tuo (Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics) ;
  • Chen, Da (Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics)
  • Received : 2016.01.27
  • Accepted : 2016.06.03
  • Published : 2016.12.25

Abstract

In this study, fast-curing shielding materials were prepared with a two-component polyurethane matrix and a filler material of PbO through a one-step, laboratory-scale method. With an increase in the filler content, viscosity increased. However, the two components showed a small difference. Curing time decreased as the filler content increased. The minimum tack-free time of 27 s was obtained at a filler content of 70 wt%. Tensile strength and compressive strength initially increased and then decreased as the filler content increased. Even when the filler content reached 60 wt%, mechanical properties were still greater than those of the matrix. Cohesional strength decreased as the filler content increased. However, cohesional strength was still greater than 100 kPa at a filler content of 60 wt%. The ${\gamma}$-ray-shielding properties increased with the increase in the filler content, and composite thickness could be increased to improve the shielding performance when the energy of ${\gamma}$-rays was high. When the filler content was 60 wt%, the composite showed excellent comprehensive properties.

Acknowledgement

Supported by : Cooperative Innovation Fund of Jiangsu Province, NUAA

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