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Intraoperative Neurophysiologic Testing of the Perigastric Vagus Nerve Branches to Evaluate Viability and Signals along Nerve Pathways during Gastrectomy

  • Kong, Seong-Ho (Department of Surgery, Seoul National University Hospital) ;
  • Kim, Sung Min (Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Hospital) ;
  • Kim, Dong-Gun (Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Hospital) ;
  • Park, Kee Hong (Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Hospital) ;
  • Suh, Yun-Suhk (Department of Surgery, Seoul National University Hospital) ;
  • Kim, Tae-Han (Department of Surgery, Seoul National University Hospital) ;
  • Kim, Il Jung (Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Hospital) ;
  • Seo, Jeong-Hwa (Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital) ;
  • Lim, Young Jin (Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital) ;
  • Lee, Hyuk-Joon (Department of Surgery, Seoul National University Hospital) ;
  • Yang, Han-Kwang (Department of Surgery, Seoul National University Hospital)
  • Received : 2018.11.07
  • Accepted : 2019.01.03
  • Published : 2019.03.31

Abstract

Purpose: The perigastric vagus nerve may play an important role in preserving function after gastrectomy, and intraoperative neurophysiologic tests might represent a feasible method of evaluating the vagus nerve. The purpose of this study is to assess the feasibility of neurophysiologic evaluations of the function and viability of perigastric vagus nerve branches during gastrectomy. Materials and Methods: Thirteen patients (1 open total gastrectomy, 1 laparoscopic total gastrectomy, and 11 laparoscopic distal gastrectomy) were prospectively enrolled. The hepatic and celiac branches of the vagus nerve were exposed, and grabbing type stimulation electrodes were applied as follows: 10-30 mA intensity, 4 trains, $1,000{\mu}s/train$, and $5{\times}$frequency. Visible myocontractile movement and electrical signals were monitored via needle probes before and after gastrectomy. Gastrointestinal symptoms were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively at 3 weeks and 3 months, respectively. Results: Responses were observed after stimulating the celiac branch in 10, 9, 10, and 6 patients in the antrum, pylorus, duodenum, and proximal jejunum, respectively. Ten patients responded to hepatic branch stimulation at the duodenum. After vagus-preserving distal gastrectomy, 2 patients lost responses to the celiac branch at the duodenum and jejunum (1 each), and 1 patient lost response to the hepatic branch at the duodenum. Significant procedure-related complications and meaningful postoperative diarrhea were not observed. Conclusions: Intraoperative neurophysiologic testing seems to be a feasible methodology for monitoring the perigastric vagus nerves. Innervation of the duodenum via the celiac branch and postoperative preservation of the function of the vagus nerves were confirmed in most patients.

Acknowledgement

Supported by : Seoul National University Hospital

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