• Title/Summary/Keyword: 착수주의직령포

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A Study on the Ritual Dress used by the Religious Groups of Dankun Followers (檀君系 敎團 儀禮服飾에 關한 硏究)

  • Kim, Hyun-Gyung;Im Sang-Im
    • Korean Journal of Human Ecology
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    • v.5 no.1
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    • pp.14-27
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    • 2002
  • The purpose of this study is to identify the ritual dress used by the 12 religious bodies of Dankun followers to help understand the teachings of these currently operating religious groups in Korea. The findings from the survey and related literatures are used to analyze the characteristics of these ritual dresses in terms of their items, construction, form, and color. The results of the study are as follows: first, most of the religious groups of Dankun followers have established the code for ritual dresses and they are named as 'chaebok'(제복, sacrificial robes), 'yebok'(예복, ceremonial dress), 'chungbok'(정복, formal attire), 'pubbok'(법복, Buddhist formal dress), or 'tobok'(도복, Taoist garments). The official headgear is usually named as 'chaemo'(제모), 'soogun'(수건), 'moja'(모자), or 'yoogun'(유건, 儒巾). Though, there are some groups which do not use any specific names for headgear. Second, the ritual dresses of most groups are composed of the 'hanbok'(한복,韓服) or usual Western-style dress, a traditional outer wear, 'po'(포,袍), and a headgear, as a basic attire. Third, the traditional 'hanbok' is worn as a base garment and an outer wear is worn above. The different types of outer wear are used: mostly 'chaksu jueui jikyoun po'(착수주의직령포, 窄袖周衣直領袍) for men and 'kwangsu jikyoung po'(광수직령포, 廣袖直領袍) and other various styles for women. The headgear from the ancient times are worn by both men and women. Fourth, the most frequently-used color for ritual dress is white for both men and women's dress. The colors from the Yin and Yang ideology are also used in the ritual dresses. Finally, the kinds of materials are not considered as an important element for the ritual dresses.

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A Study on the Structural Characteristics of Ceremonial Costumes in New Aboriginal Religious Groups in Korea (한국(韓國) 개창(開創) 신흥종교(新興宗敎) 의예복식(儀禮服飾)의 구조적(構造的)인 특징(特徵)에 관(關)한 연구(硏究))

  • Kim, Hyun-Gyung;Im, Sang-Im
    • Korean Journal of Human Ecology
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    • v.13 no.1
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    • pp.185-194
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    • 2004
  • This study examined the characteristics of 45 sects of seven new aboriginal religious groups in Korea including Jeungsan sect, Tangun sect, Soowoon sect, Won Buddhism, Bongnam sect, Gahksedo sect, Shamanism sect that had given a considerable influence on the modem Korean society since the end of 19th century through the field study and the review of documents. The purpose of the study was to elucidate how their religious ideas were reflected in their ceremonial costumes and what characteristics these costumes had. The results were as follows: 1. The new religious groups in Korea modified or mixed the designs or the names of existing outfits to convey their ideas or beliefs through their costumes. 2. The costumes of new religious groups had common characteristics of the times, Korean tradition and ancestor worship. 3. All the ceremonial costumes symbolized the creeds and ideas of each religion in their names, designs, and colors. The names of the costumes such as Way-Robe, Law-Robe, and Ceremony-Robe, and of the headpieces such as Sky-Crown, Lotus-Crown, Ceremony-Crown, and Sevenfold-Crown, for instance, were related with Buddhism, Taoism, and Confucianism. The most common design of costume was consisted of traditional hanbok and some type of headpiece and robe for men, and hanbok modified to Western-style for women. Most sects adopted hanbok as their ceremonial costume, but they tend to simplify its design. The color scheme of the costumes reflected the influence of the Yul-Yang and Five Elements idea but the colors varied depending on seasons and occasions to suit their creeds and philosophy. 4. These religious costumes were worn at various ceremonies, ritual, and various anniversary services for the master and other dignitaries of the sect to render greater piety to those gatherings, to distinguish the sect from other religious groups, to clarify the meaning of the ceremony, and to heighten the devout feelings of the participants. Thus, the structure (the symbol, names, and types of the outfit, and their color scheme) and religious background of the costumes of the new aboriginal religious groups in Korea turned out to have inherited and mixed various elements of traditional Korean outfits and those of existing religions to symbolize their religious ideas.

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