• Title, Summary, Keyword: Aqua-walking

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Gait Pattern of Hemiplegic Patients with Swimming Aqua-noodles

  • Kim, Suk-Bum;O'Sullivan, David
    • Korean Journal of Sport Biomechanics
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    • v.29 no.1
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    • pp.15-21
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    • 2019
  • Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of aqua-noodles on the practice of underwater walking in patients with hemiplegia. Method: After an oral explanation and signing an IRB approved consent form 10 participants ($66.8{\pm}10.75yr$, $165.3{\pm}8.79cm$, $73.6{\pm}46kg$) agreed to participate in this study. Each of the participants was required to walk with the aqua noodles and without the aqua-noodles in a swimming pool. Each participant was asked to walk a distance of 5 m a total of 10 times, 5 with and 5 without the aqua-noodles. The depth of the swimming pool was at 1.3 m, approximately chest height. The following variables were calculated for analysis; height of the knee (m), knee joint ROM ($^{\circ}$), ankle joint ROM ($^{\circ}$), knee joint maximum angular velocity ($^{\circ}/sec$), and ankle joint maximum angular velocity ($^{\circ}/sec$). Results: First, there was a significant increase in time (s) for the maximum knee height to reach as well as the maximum knee height (m) increased when the participant used the aqua-noodles. Second, there was a statistically significant decrease in stride length when the aqua-noodles were used. Conclusion: This study helps to verify that the effect of underwater walking exercise can provide a suitable walking exercise environment. The results of this study provide systematic scientific information about how walking in water can be used for the rehabilitation of patients and the elderly.

Effect of Wearing Ankle Weights on Underwater Treadmill Walking

  • Park, Que Tae;Kim, Suk Bum;O'Sullivan, David
    • Korean Journal of Sport Biomechanics
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    • v.29 no.2
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    • pp.105-112
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    • 2019
  • Objective: The main purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of wearing an ankle weight belt while performing gait in water by focusing on the effect of using ankle weights have on the gait kinematics and the muscle activities for developing optimum training strategies. Method: A total of 10 healthy male university students were recruited for the study. Each participant was instructed to perform 3 gait conditions; normal walking over ground, walking in water chest height, and walking in water chest height while using ankle weights. All walking conditions were set at control speed of $4km/h{\pm}0.05km/h$. The depth of the swimming pool was at 1.3 m, approximately chest height. The motion capture data was recorded using 6 digital cameras and the EMG was recorded using waterproof Mini Wave. From the motion capture data, the following variables were calculated for analysis; double and single support phase (s), swing phase (s), step length (%height), step rate (m/s), ankle, knee, and hip joint angles ($^{\circ}$). From the electromyography the %RVC of the lower limb muscles medial gastrocnemius, rectus femoris, erector spinae, semitendinosus, tibialis anterior, vastus lateralis oblique was calculated. Results: The results show significant differences between the gait time, and step length between the right and left leg. Additionally, the joint angular velocities and gait velocity were significantly affected by the water resistance. As expected, the use of the ankle weights increased all of the lower leg maximum muscle activities except for the lower back muscle. Conclusion: In conclusion, the ankle weights can be shown to stimulate more muscle activity during walking in chest height water and therefore, may be useful for rehabilitation purposes.

An Analysis of Exercise Intervention Studies Published in Major Korean Nursing Journals (국내 주요 간호학회지에 발표된 운동 중재연구의 분석)

  • Choe, Myong-Ae;Jeon, Mi-Yang;Lee, Kyong-Sook;Chae, Young-Ran;Choo, Jin-A
    • Journal of Korean Biological Nursing Science
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    • v.8 no.1
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    • pp.61-81
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    • 2006
  • Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine exercise program and outcome variables of exercise intervention studies from 1985 to 2004 in 9 major nursing journals in Korea. Method: From 81 articles, publishing year, research design, subjects, exercise program and outcome variables were analyzed. Results: The 57 papers(70.4%) were experimental research among 81 papers. Subjects of exercise intervention studies were demonstrated that patients were 55.6% while healthy person was 44.4%. Exercise type by the subjects which demonstrated the highest proportion was dance movement for the elderly, walking for the middle aged women and aqua exercise for the arthritis. The 40 papers(49.4%) included exercise duration, frequency and time for the exercise program which demonstrated the highest proportion. Outcome variables to determine the effect of exercise intervention were demonstrated to be physical function, physiological index, psychological and emotional variables, cardiopulmonary function, body composition, physical symptoms, variables related to exercise and behavior in order. Conclusion: Half of the exercise intervention papers included exercise duration, frequency, time and intensity for the exercise program. Frequently used outcome variables to determine the effect of exercise intervention were demonstrated to be physical function, physiological index and psychological emotional variables.

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The Effect of Aquatic Task Training on Gait and Balance Ability in Stroke Patients

  • Lee, Ji-Yeun;Park, Jung-Seo;Kim, Kyoung
    • The Journal of Korean Physical Therapy
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    • v.23 no.3
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    • pp.29-35
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    • 2011
  • Purpose: The purpose of study was to measure stroke patients' ability to balance and their degrees of clinical function and to examine the effect of the aquatic exercise method using tasks related to these features. Methods: Twenty stroke patients were randomly assigned to an aquatic task exercise group and a land task exercise group. Both groups used the same exercise method for 60 minutes each session, three times a week for 12 weeks at the same time point and with the same amount of exercise. Results: Before and after the exercise, static balance was measured using balance measuring instruments locomotive faculties, muscular strength, and dynamic balance were assessed through the Berg balance and 10 m gait tests. Finally, gait abilities were measured, and the data obtained were analyzed to generate the results. Conclusion: Both groups showed significant improvement, but the aquatic exercise group showed slightly more significant results in static balance, Berg balance, and upright walking tests. It is thought that the improvement of stroke patients' balance and gait ability can be triggered through the application of aquatic exercise programs in the future.