• Title, Summary, Keyword: Spinal Cage

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A Research on the Reliability Assessment and Improvement of Spinal Cage using by the Failure Mechanism by the Impulse (충격량에 의한 고장메커니즘을 활용한 추간체유합보형재의 신뢰성 평가 방법 및 개선에 관한 연구)

  • Yu, Woo-Jin;Lee, Yong-Yoon;Heo, Sung-Yong;Ham, Jung-Koel
    • Journal of Applied Reliability
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    • v.14 no.4
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    • pp.243-247
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    • 2014
  • The Spinal cage is the cage-shaped implantable medical device used to treat structural abnormalities caused by degenerative intervertebral disks. In order to secure enough space to provide the mechanical stability and the intervertebral fusion, after removing the intervertebral disc, the Spinal cage is transplanted between the intervertebral space. A hammer is used to push the spinal cage into a narrow space during the spinal cage transplant surgery. Due to the impact and pressure, damage occurs frequently on the spinal cage. In this study, a test model is constructed to measure the value of impulse generally applied on the Spinal cage. The figures of internal impulse before and after the improvement of the Spinal cage are then compared to suggest direction to improve the reliability of the spinal cage.

Design and testing of a minimally invasive intervertebral cage for spinal fusion surgery

  • Anderson, Walter;Chapman, Cory;Karbaschi, Zohreh;Elahinia, Mohammad;Goel, Vijay
    • Smart Structures and Systems
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    • v.11 no.3
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    • pp.283-297
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    • 2013
  • An innovative cage for spinal fusion surgery is presented within this work. The cage utilizes shape memory alloy for its hinge actuation. Because of the use of SMA, a smaller incision is needed which makes the cage deployment minimally invasive. In the development of the cage, a model for predicting the torsional behavior of SMAs was developed and verified experimentally. The prototype design of the cage was developed and manufactured. The prototype was subjected to static tests per ASTM specifications. The cage survived all of the tests, alluding to its safety within the body.

The Effect of Thoracic Cage Mobilization and Breathing Exercise of Respiratory Function, Spinal Curve and Spinal Mobility in Elderly with Restrictive Lung Disease

  • Wang, Joong San
    • Journal of International Academy of Physical Therapy Research
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    • v.9 no.1
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    • pp.1393-1397
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    • 2018
  • The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of combined respiratory physical therapy on respiratory function, spinal curve and spinal mobility for community-dwelling elderlies with restrictive lung diseases. In total, 10 patients participated in an 8-week intervention program of thoracic cage mobilization and breathing exercise in combination. The results of the study are as follows: for respiratory function, the forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), forced vital capacity(FVC), and FEV1/FVC were significantly improved to $.30{\pm}0.31{\ell}$, $.46{\pm}.42{\ell}$, and $18.10{\pm}11.39%$, respectively (p<.05). For spinal curve, the thoracic curve and the lumbar curve were improved significantly to $-2.20{\pm}1.40^{\circ}$ and $-1.20{\pm}1.14^{\circ}$, respectively (p<.01). For spinal mobility, the thoracic flexion ($3.40{\pm}2.99^{\circ}$), thoracic extension ($3.50{\pm}1.43^{\circ}$), lumbar flexion ($4.50{\pm}4.74^{\circ}$), and lumbar extension($-1.50{\pm}1.84^{\circ}$) were all significantly improved (p<.05). These findings indicate that thoracic cage mobilization and breathing exercise in combination improve the respiratory function, spinal alignment, and spinal mobility in elderly people with restrictive lung diseases.

A study on the placing cage stability using FEM (FEM을 이용한 Cage 삽입 시 안정성에 관한 연구)

  • Park, Ki-Hoon;Park, Jeong-Ho;Cho, Woo-Seok;Kim, Hyun-Soo
    • Proceedings of the KSME Conference
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    • pp.1364-1367
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    • 2003
  • These days, spinal interbody arthrodesis using fusion cage is very popular. The cage used for the spinal interbody arthrodesis is mainly inserted from the posterior of the spine. Accordingly, there could possibly occur damages at posterior and results in instability of structure. Moreover, one or two cages are inserted depending on the patients. In this study, it is attempted to evaluate the stability quantitatively by comparing two cases where one and two cages are inserted. For this purpose, a very fine 3-dimensional finite element model of vertebra is generated from the MRI data. From this vertebra model, two models are made: one with one cage and the other with two cages. Finally, finite element analys is performed for these two models and both of the mechanical behaviors are examined In addition, the effect on the stability is evaluated and compared quantitatively.

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A Study about Cervical Cage Structural Analysis Using Finite Element Method (FEM 을 이용한 경추용 Cage 의 구조해석)

  • 정우철;최진화;최길운;김성민;조명우
    • Proceedings of the Korean Society of Precision Engineering Conference
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    • pp.137-140
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    • 2004
  • Intervertebral cages in the cervical spine have been advantage in spinal fusion to relieve low back pain. In this study the effects of an intervertebral cage insertion on a cervical spine functional spinal unit investigate and cage structural analysis using finite element method. Three-Dimensional finite element models to create computed tomography (CT) scan C3-C4, obtain healthy young male which 1-mm slice section.

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Using the PNF Approach to Improve Respiratory Function in Patients with Cervical Spinal Cord Injuries (고유수용성촉진법을 이용한 호흡운동이 경수 손상환자의 호흡기능에 미치는 영향 : 증례보고)

  • Song, Gui-Bin;Kim, Jung-Bin
    • PNF and Movement
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    • v.12 no.2
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    • pp.115-121
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    • 2014
  • Purpose: The study aimed to examine the influence of PNF direct and indirect breathing treatments for patients with cervical spinal cord injuries who had breathing problems. Methods: For each cervical spinal cord patient, force vital capacity (FVC), peak expiratory flow, maximum phonation time (MPT), rib cage width, and VAS were measured pre-intervention and four weeks after post-intervention. The indirect method and the direct method were used for interventions. We treated patients with the indirect method using scapular anterior depression pattern, bilateral extensor pattern with rhythmic initiation, and a combination of isotonic. We treated patients with the direct method, applying pressure on the sternum and using rhythmic initiation (hold relax and stretch reflex) for the rib cage. Training occurred for 50 minutes a day and three days per week for four weeks. Results: FVC, MPT, peak expiratory flow, and rib cage width were increased and decreased at the VAS point for rolling after treatment. Conclusion: Patients with cervical spinal cord injuries who had breathing problems felt uncomfortable when they had conversations on a couch. We found that PNF direct and indirect treatments improved rib cage width and breathing functions of patients with cervical spinal cord injuries.

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Effect of thoracic cage mobilization on respiratory function, spinal curve and spinal movement in patients with restrictive lung disease

  • Wang, Joong San
    • Journal of International Academy of Physical Therapy Research
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    • v.7 no.2
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    • pp.1006-1010
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    • 2016
  • This study aimed to examine the effects of thoracic cage mobilization on the respiratory function, spinal curve and spinal movement in patients with restrictive lung diseases. The subjects were ten community-dwelling elderly with a restrictive lung diseases when measured using a spirometer($FEV1/FVC{\leq}65%$, FVC<80%). They received an intervention over an eight-week period: three times a week and for 30 minutes a day. SPSS for Windows(ver. 19.0) was used to analyze all the collected data. Independent t-tests were used to examine changes before and after the intervention. The study's results showed statistically significant improvement(p<.05) in forced expiratory volume in 1 second(chage rate: .$24{\pm}.25$), thoracic curve(chage rate: $-2.50{\pm}2.76$), lumbar curve(chage rate: $-.80{\pm}1.32$), thoracic flexion(chage rate: $2.10{\pm}1.52$), thoracic extension(chage rate: $-2.00{\pm}1.25$), lumbar flexion(chage rate: $2.40{\pm}3.13$) and lumbar extension(chage rate: $-1.30{\pm}1.42$). The results of this study suggest that the thoracic cage mobilization contribute to improve pulmonary function in patients with restrictive lung disease.

The Mechanical Sensitivity at Interfaces between Bone and Interbody Cage of Lumbar Spine Segments (Lumbar spine 의 뼈와 Interbody cage의 접촉면에서 기계공학적 민감성 고찰)

  • Kim Y.
    • Journal of Biomedical Engineering Research
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    • v.21 no.3
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    • pp.295-301
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    • 2000
  • It is known that among many factors, relative micromotion at bone/implant interfaces can hinder bone ingrowth into surface pores of an implant. Loading conditions, mechanical properties of spinal materials, friction coefficients at the interfaces and geometry of spinal segments would affect the relative micromotion and spinal stability. A finite clement model of the human lumbar spine segments (L4-L5) was constructed to investigate the mechanical sensitivity at the interfaces between bone and cage. Relative micromotion. Posterior axial displacement. bone stress, cage stress and friction force were predicted in changes of friction coefficients, loading conditions. bone density and age-related material/geometric properties of the spinal segments. Relative micromotion (slip distance in a static loading means relative micromotion in routine activity) at the interfaces increased significantly as the mechanical properties of cancellous bone, annulus fibers or/and ligaments decrease or/and as the friction coefficient at the interfaces decreases. The contact normal force at the interfaces decreased as cancellous bone density decreases or/and as the friction coefficient increases A significant increase of slip distance at anterior annulus occurred with an addition of torsion to compressive preload. Relative micromotion decreased with an increase of disc area. In conclusion. relative micromotion, stress response. Posterior axial displacement and contact normal force are sensitive to the friction coefficient of the interfaces, bone density, loading conditions and age-related geometric/material changes.

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Expandable Cage for Cervical Spine Reconstruction

  • Zhang, Ho-Yeol;Thongtrangan, Issada;Le, Hoang;Park, Jon;Kim, Daniel H.
    • Journal of Korean Neurosurgical Society
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    • v.38 no.6
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    • pp.435-441
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    • 2005
  • Objective : Expandable cage used for spinal reconstruction after corpectomy has several advantages over nonexpendable cages. Here we present our clinical experience with the use of this cage after anterior column corpectomy with an average of one year follow up. Methods : Ten patients underwent expandable cage reconstruction of the anterior column after single-level or multilevel corpectomy for various cervical spinal disorders. Anterior plating with or without additional posterior instrumentation were performed in all patients. Functional outcomes, complications, and radiographic outcomes were determined. Results : There was no cage-related complication. Functionally, neurological examination revealed improvement in 7 of 10 patients and no patient had neurological deterioration after the surgery. Immediate stability was achieved and maintained throughout the period of follow-up. There was minimal subsidence [<2mm] noticeable in three of the cases that underwent a two-level corpectomy. Subsidence was noted in osteoporotic patients and patients undergoing multi-level corpectomies. Average pre-operative kyphotic angle was 9 degrees. This was corrected to an average of 5.4 degrees in lordosis postoperatively. Conclusion : In conclusion, expandable cages are safe and effective devices for vertebral body replacement after cervical corpectomy when used in combination with anterior plating with or without additional posterior stabilization. The advantages of using expandable cages include its ability to easily accommodate itself into the corpectomy defect, its ability to tightly purchase into the end plates after expansion and thus minimizing the potential for migration, and finally, its ability to correct kyphosis deformity via its in vivo expansion properties.

The Safety and Efficacy of Cadaveric Allografts and Titanium Cage as a Fusion Substitutes in Pyogenic Osteomyelitis

  • Kim, Hyun-Woo;Ryu, Je-Il;Bak, Koang-Hum
    • Journal of Korean Neurosurgical Society
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    • v.50 no.4
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    • pp.348-356
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    • 2011
  • Objective : The safety and efficacy of various fusion substitutes in pyogenic osteomyelitis has not been investigated. We evaluated and compared the cadaveric allograft and titanium cages used to reconstruct, maintain alignment and achieve fusion in the management of pyogenic spinal infection. Methods : There were 33 patients with pyogenic osteomyelitis underwent fusion in this study. Fifteen of the 33 patients were operated on by fusion with allografts (cadaveric patella bones) and 18 of those were operated with titanium mesh cages filled with autologous cancellous iliac bone. After the affected disc and vertebral body resection with pus drainage, cadaveric allograft or titanium cages were inserted into the resected space. Posterior transpedicular screw fixation and rod compression in resected space, where cadaveric allograft or titanium cages were inserted, was performed to prevent the malposition in all patients except in 1 case. Recurrent infection was identified by serial erythrocyte sedimentation rate and cross reactive protein follow-up. Osseous union and recurred infection available at a minimum of 2 years following operation was identified. The amount of kyphosis correction and the subsidence were measured radiographically. Results : Spinal fusion was achieved in 29 of 33 patients. In the cadaveric allograft group, 93.3% of patient (14 of 15) showed the osseous union while 83.3% of patient (15 of 18) in the titanium cage group showed union. Subsidence was noted in 12 of the patients. Twelve patients (36.3%) showed unsettling amounts of subsidence postoperatively whereas 46.6% of patients in the cadaveric allograft group and 37.7% of patients in the titanium cage group showed similar subsidence, respectively. There were statistical difference in the fusion rate (p=0.397) and subsidence rate (p=0.276) between the two groups. There was significant statistical difference in the postoperative improvement of segmental kyphosis between the two groups (p=0.022), that is the improvement in sagittal alignment was greater in the titanium cage group than in the cadaveric allograft group. There was no case of recurred infection. Conclusion : The cadaveric allograft and titanium cages are effective and safe in restoring and maintaining sagittal plane alignment without increased incidence in infection recurrence in pyogenic osteomyelitis. The postoperative improvement of segmental kyphosis was better in the cage group.