• Title, Summary, Keyword: antibody response

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Studies on the Enhancing Effect of Polymyxin B on the Antibodies Response of Enterobacterial Antigens (Pomyxin B의 장계세균항원(腸系細菌抗原)에 대(對)한 항체산생(抗體産生) 증강작용(增强作用)에 관(關)한 연구(硏究))

  • Lee, Jae-Koo
    • The Journal of the Korean Society for Microbiology
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    • v.6 no.1
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    • pp.29-40
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    • 1971
  • Various kinds of antibiotics are generally believed to have inhibitory effects on the antibody response. However, as polymyxin B which belongs to the cyclic polypeptide group of antibiotic was found to have some enhancing effects on the antibody response of rabbits to enterobacterial common antigen(CA) under specified conditions, experiments were carried out on this problem with the following results. 1. When mixture of polymyxin B and CA derived from Salmonella typhimurium(STM) was treated 30 minutes at $37^{\circ}C$ and injected three times into rabbits by intravenous route, the antibody response to CA was weaker than rabbits injected CA only. 2. Mixture of polymyxin B and CA showed a marked antibody production when injected into rabbits primed with small amounts of heat-extracted antigen of STM, while the injection of CA alone showed low titers of response. 3. Mixture of polymyxin B and heat-extracted CA-containing antigen of Escherichia coli 014 also showed a increased antibody production than CA alone in rabbits primed with antigen of STM. 4. The effect of polymyxin B appeared in different ways. This antibiotic did not enhance the CA antibody response in rabbits primed with small amounts of E. coli 0111 and 055, but enhance in rabbits primed with Shigella flexneri. 5. No enhancing effect on the antibody response was observed by polymyxin B in rabbits primed with CA. 6. No enhancing effect on the antibody response was also noted in rabbits primed with STM antigen in case polymyxin B and CA were administered simultaneously but in veins of different places. 7. Bacitracin did not enhance the CA antibody response in primed rabbits with STM antigen, but neomycin slightly enhance the response. 8. Lipopolysaccharide showed no priming effect on the CA antibody response, and no enhancement of the CA antibody response in rabbits printed with STM. 9. The priming effect of STM antigen against CA antibody response was very weak as compared with the effect of CA derived from STM antigen.

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Lower Antibody Response in Chickens Homozygous for the Mx Resistant Allele to Avian Influenza

  • Qu, L.J.;Li, X.Y.;Xu, G.Y.;Ning, Z.H.;Yang, N.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.22 no.4
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    • pp.465-470
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    • 2009
  • The chicken Mx gene has been regarded as a candidate gene for resistance to avian influenza virus (AIV). In this study, three groups of chickens with homozygotes (AA, GG) and heterozygotes (AG) of the resistant (A) and susceptible alleles (G) to AIV of the Mx gene were constructed from a line of dwarf egg-type chickens. These chickens were not examined for their resistant activities to AIV because the differential resistance had only been detected in vitro. The birds of the three groups were vaccinated with inactivated H5N2 AIV vaccine and the level of hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody to AIV was detected. The association between disease resistant activity to AIV and antibody response to AIV vaccination in the three groups was analyzed. The chickens with homozygous resistant allele A showed the lowest antibody levels, whereas the heterozygous chickens (AG) presented the highest antibody level after the boosting vaccination, which indicates that the efficiency of artificial selection on the resistant allele of Mx gene will be compromised since the homozygotes of the allele presented the weakest antibody response to the corresponding vaccine.

Response of Rabbit Appendix Cells to Specific Antigen and Mitogen (가토충양돌기세포(家兎蟲樣突起細胞)의 특이항원(特異抗原) 및 Mitogen에 대(對)한 반응(反應))

  • Ha, Tai-You
    • The Journal of the Korean Society for Microbiology
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    • v.10 no.1
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    • pp.1-8
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    • 1975
  • Despite a number of recent studies on appendix its function appears to remain unknown. The present studies were undertaken in order to extend and confirm the previous studies concerning the role of appendix in immune response. An early hemagglutinin response of mercaptoethanol sensitive antibody(IgM antibody) in rabbit injected intravenously(i.v.) with 200mcg of bovine gamma globulin(BGG) was abolished by lethal whole body irradiation(900 r), but preserved in animals whose appendix and bone marrow were shielded during irradiation. Late formation of mercaptoethanol resistant antibody(IgG antibody) and the development of memory in bone marrow shielded animals were not affected by irradiation of the appendix. Formation of either IgM or IgG antibody to sheep red blood cells(SRBC) injected i.v. as determined by direct plaque forming cell(DPFC) technique in spleen were effectively abolished by appendectomy, thymectomy, or both followed by irradiation. When bone marrow was shielded in combination with autologous appendix reconstitution, DPFC response was about 5 times greater than the sum of two. Lysed appendix cells failed to restore the response. Lethally irradiated rabbits restored with combination of autologous appendix and thymus cells showed DPFC responses which were essentially normal. Three pools of appendix were obtained by manual separation technique and were stimulated with soluble concanavalin A(Con A), phytohemagglutinin-P(PHA) and pokeweed mitogen(PWM). Rabbit appendix cells responded to Con A, PHA and PWM. Cells of thymus dependent area(TDA) of the appendix were relatively enriched in their response to T cell mitogens compared to dome and follicle cells. The PHA/Con A responsive ratio of appenix TDA subpopulation was high, indicating that Con A responsive cells have a wider distribution among appendix. This finding showed that interfollicular area of the appendix is thymus-dependent. The present studies confirmed other evidence that the rabbit appendix cells itself are unable to form antibody and T lymphocytes in appendix TDA may be heterogenous, and that the appendix cells are synergistic with either bone marrow or thymus cells in the early hemagglutinin on splenic antibody response to BGG or SRBC.

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Effect of 65 kDa Buffalo Placental Protein on B-Cell Proliferation and Antibody Response

  • Deepthi, K.;Rajput, Y.S.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.15 no.3
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    • pp.432-437
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    • 2002
  • Immunosuppressive potential of 65 kDa buffalo placental protein (bPP65) on B-cell proliferation in vitro and antibody response in vivo was evaluated. B-cell proliferation was estimated by measuring incorporation of tritiated thymidine in buffalo lymphocytes while primary antibody responses against phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) or keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH) were evaluated in mice. bPP65 suppressed proliferation of lipopolysaccharide (a B-cell specific mitogen)-stimulated buffalo lymphocytes in vitro indicating suppression of B-cells. This suppression was dose dependent over the protein concentration range $25-100 {\mu}g/ml$. Primary antibody responses in mice against PHA and KLH in presence of bPP65 were lower as compared to in its absence but these were not statistically significant. Amino acid composition data of bPP65 and BSA suggested that bPP65 is different from BSA.

Immunosuppressive Effects of Safrole in BALB/c Mice

  • Kim, Byung-Sam;Jeong, Tae-Cheon;Choe, Suck-Young;Yang, Kyu-Hwan
    • Toxicological Research
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    • v.8 no.2
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    • pp.191-203
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    • 1992
  • The immunosuppressive effects of safrole were studied in female BALB/c mouse. Mice were given 100,200and 400mg safrole/kg daily for 14days and evaluated on day 15. The day 4 immunogloblin-M antibody response to T-dependent antigen, sheep red blood cells (SRBC) was inhibited dose-dependently in all doses studied. In vitro antibody response to polyclonal antigen, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by spleen cell suspensions from safrole-treated mice were also significantly inhibited. When safrole was treated for 14days to mice, and mitogen-induced proliferation of splenocytes were assayed on day 15, there were significant suppression of responses to B-cell mitogen, LPS and T-cell mitogen concanavalin A(Con A) at a dose of 400mg safrole/kg. Direct addition of safrole on the splenocyte culture also produced a dose dependent suppression on in vitro antibody response to LPS, and mitogen-induced lymphoproliferatin at doses of 100,200,400 and 800${\mu}M$ safrole. The role of metabolic activation in safrole-induced suppression of in vitro antibody response was studied using splenocyte-hepatocyte coculture system. The suppression of in vitro antibody respose to LPS by safrole was not altered when safrole were incubated in the splenocyte-hepatocyte system for 4hr as compared with direct addition of safrole in splenocytes culture. Neither the addition of salicylamide, sulfotransferase inhibitor, nor the addation of inorganic sulfate, sulfation cofactor to the splenocyte-hepatocyte coculture, altered the suppression of antibody response by safrole. These results suggest that the immunosuppression by safrole may not by produced by the reactive metabolites which are mediated in carcinogenesis of safrole.

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Effects of Florfenicol and Chromium (III) on Humoral Immune Response in Chicks

  • Cao, Jiyue;Li, Kui;Lu, Xiaocong;Zhao, Yaxin
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.17 no.3
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    • pp.366-370
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    • 2004
  • One hundred and sixty day-old Hainan chicks were randomly allotted into eight pens to investigate the effect of different dietary concentrations of chromium (Cr) in the form of chromium chloride, and different dosages of florfenicol on humoral immune responses by determining antibody titers to Newcastle disease (ND) vaccines using the hemagglutination inhibition test. The results indicated that ND antibody titers were significantly higher in chicks receiving Cr at low (5 mg/kg feed) and middle (10 mg/kg feed) dose compared with the control (p<0.01). However, ND antibody titers were significantly decreased in chicks receiving Cr at a high dosage of 500 mg/kg feed (p<0.01), though the ND antibody titers of the early days (d 21 and d 28 of age) were higher than that of the control group. It is suggested that excessive Cr intake has detrimental effects on ND antibody production in chicks. No significantly lower response was measured in chicks that received florfenicol at a low dosage of 50 mg/kg feed (p>0.05), but the ND antibody titers were significantly decreased in chicks receiving 200 and 400 mg/kg feed of the drug (p<0.01). The ND antibody titers of group receiving 200 mg/kg feed of florfenicol plus 10 mg/kg Cr were slightly higher than that of the group receiving single florfenicol of 200 mg/kg although, no significant differences were observed between these two treatments. It is suggested that the humoral immune response impaired by florfenicol (200 mg/kg feed) could not be significantly reversed by Cr (10 mg/kg feed).

Influence of Temperature Shifts on Antibody Synthesis in the Oliver Flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) Immunised with Formalin Killed Edwardsiella tarda Antigen

  • Jeong, Hyun-Do;Yoon, So-Hye;Jeong, Jun-Gi;Jun, Lyn-Jin;Jeong, Joon-Bum;Lee, June-Woo
    • Journal of fish pathology
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    • v.19 no.3
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    • pp.235-241
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    • 2006
  • The effects of various temperature shifts on the kinetics of the humoral antibody response in oliver flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus, immunised with formalin-killed Edwardsiella tarda, were determined by measuring the antibody production in vivo and in vitro. When fish acclimated to a high temperature and immunised at that temperature were transferred to a lower temperature (22℃ to 12℃) at a various times after immunisation, the fish showed a weaker immune response than that achieved when the fish were kept at a high environmental temperature. However, in the converse experiment (12℃ to 22℃), the magnitude of the humoral immune response was recovered independent of the time of the transfer after immunisation at low temperature, even though the peak levels of each transferred group did not reach the level found in the positive control group that was maintained and immunised at a high environmental temperature. Hence, these studies provide some evidence that the potential for antibody production in B cells of oliver flounder immunized at high temperature is not impaired by subsequent exposure to low temperature.

Effect of Sound Stress on Immune Response (소음 스트레스가 면역반응에 미치는 영향에 관한 실험적 연구)

  • 김금재
    • Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing
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    • v.19 no.2
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    • pp.135-146
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    • 1989
  • This study was undertaken to assess the effect of sound stress on humoral and cellular immune responses to thymus-dependent and independent antigens in mice. After mice were exposed to 4 hr daily sound stessors(83㏈) for 4 days before or after immunization, the primary and / or secondary immune response to sheep red blood cells(SRBC), polyvinylpyrroridone(PVP) or picry1 chloride(TNCB) were assayed. When mice were exposed to sound stressor before or after immunization, delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction and contact sensitivity to TNCB was remarkably depressed compared with those of the unstressed control mice. However, the primary and secondary hemagglutinin response of the stresed mice to SRBC showed a pronounced increase compared with that of the unstressed mice, In contrast to antibody response to SRBC, the primary antibody response of the stressed mic to PVP was almost not detected. surprisingly, the secondary antibody response to PVP of the mice receiving the secondary sound stress was markedly increased when the immune-depressed mice received the secondary immunization with PVP at 46 days after the primary immunization. The susceptibility of mice to intraven-oulsy infected Candida albicans was not changed by the sound stress.

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Ginsan Enhances Humoral Antibody Response to Orally Delivered Antigen

  • Na, Hee Sam;Lim, You Jin;Yun, Yeon-Sook;Kweon, Mi Na;Lee, Hyun-Chul
    • IMMUNE NETWORK
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    • v.10 no.1
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    • pp.5-14
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    • 2010
  • Background: There have been several reports describing the capability of ginseng extracts as an adjuvant. In this study, we tested if ginsan, a polysaccharide extracted from Panax ginseng, was effective in enhancing antibody response to orally delivered Salmonella antigen. Methods: Ginsan was treated before oral salmonella antigen administration. Salmonella specific antibody was determined by ELISA. mRNA expression was determined by RT-PCR. Cell migration was determined by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. COX expression was detected by western blot. Results: Ginsan treatment before oral Salmonella antigen delivery significantly increased both secretory and serum antibody production. Ginsan increased the expression of COX in the Peyer's patches. Various genes were screened and we found that CCL3 mRNA expression was increased in the Peyer's patch. Ginsan increased dendritic cells in the Peyer's patch and newly migrated dendritic cells were mostly found in the subepithelial dome region. When COX inhibitors were treated, the expression of CCL3 was reduced. COX inhibitor also antagonized both the migration of dendritic cells and the humoral immune response against oral Salmonella antigen. Conclusion: Ginsan effectively enhances the humoral immune response to orally delivered antigen, mediated by CCL3 via COX. Ginsan may serve as a potent vaccine suppliment for oral immunization.

Immunosignature: Serum Antibody Profiling for Cancer Diagnostics

  • Chapoval, Andrei I;Legutki, J Bart;Stafford, Philip;Trebukhov, Andrey V;Johnston, Stephen A;Shoikhet, Yakov N;Lazarev, Alexander F
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.16 no.12
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    • pp.4833-4837
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    • 2015
  • Biomarkers for preclinical diagnosis of cancer are valuable tools for detection of malignant tumors at early stages in groups at risk and screening healthy people, as well as monitoring disease recurrence after treatment of cancer. However the complexity of the body's response to the pathological processes makes it virtually impossible to evaluate this response to the development of the disease using a single biomarker that is present in the serum at low concentrations. An alternative approach to standard biomarker analysis is called immunosignature. Instead of going after biomarkers themselves this approach rely on the analysis of the humoral immune response to molecular changes associated with the development of pathological processes. It is known that antibodies are produced in response to proteins expressed during cancer development. Accordingly, the changes in antibody repertoire associated with tumor growth can serve as biomarkers of cancer. Immunosignature is a highly sensitive method for antibody repertoire analysis utilizing high density peptide microarrays. In the present review we discuss modern methods for antibody detection, as well as describe the principles and applications of immunosignature in research and clinical practice.