The Synthesis and Evaluation of Pendant Oligosaccharide-Lipid Side Chain Copolymer

  • Nam, Hye-Sung (Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Polymer Technology Institute, Sungkyunkwan University) ;
  • Kim, Hyun-Joo (Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Polymer Technology Institute, Sungkyunkwan University) ;
  • Nam, Kwang-Woo (Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Polymer Technology Institute, Sungkyunkwan University) ;
  • Chung, Dong-June (Intellectual Biointerface Engineering Center(IBEC), Seoul National University)
  • Published : 2003.04.01

Abstract

In this research, the in vitro anti-thrombogenecity of artificial materials was evaluated using hydrophilic/hydrophobic copolymers containing oiligosaccharide as hydrophilic moiety and phospholipid as hydrophobic moiety respectively. N-(p-vinylbenzyl)-[O-$\alpha$-D-glucopyranosyl-(1longrightarrow4)]$_{n-1}$-D-glucoamide(VM7A) was (VM7 A) was adopted as hydrophilic oligosaccharide and 2-acryloxybutyl-2-(triethylammonium)ethyl phosphoric acid (HBA-choline) was adopted as hydrophobic phospholipid. Copolymers having various monomer feeding molar ratios were synthesized through radical polymerization. The synthesized copolymers were identified using FT-IR, $^1$H-NMR, XPS, and DSC. The surface energy of the copolymers were evaluated by dynamic contact angle (DCA) method and checked different roles of VM7A as hydrophilic moiety and HBA-choline as hydrophobic moiety on surface. The surface morphological differences between hydrated and unhydrated surfaces of copolymers were observed and evaluated using Am. The platelets were separated from canine whole blood by centrifugation and adopted to the anti-thromobogenecity test of the copolymers. From the results, we find out that as VM7A ratio increases, so did anti-thrombogenecity. Such results show the possibility of using these copolymers as blood compatible materials in living body.y.

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